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Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX





Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy



FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate


A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers







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Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

Trump's comment not racist

A lot of people are taking President Trump's "sh—hole countries" comment out of context and cashing in on it for their own glory ("Hillary Clinton condemns Trump's 'ignorant,' 'racist' 'sh—hole' comment," Web, Jan. 12). I am an African, and I can tell you, Mr. Trump is not a racist. Those calling him one are the racists. For instance, will all those whites calling him a racist allow their children to marry black people? Or will they welcome black sons- and daughters-in-law in their houses? How many black people occupy significant positions in their employ? These are questions for thought.

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the National Governors Association special session called "Collaborating to Create Tomorrow's Global Economy" in Providence, R.I., July 14, 2017. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE **

A lesson from Canada

Talking the talk is easy. Walking the walk is not so easy. Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, thought he could take a shot at the Americans, and Donald Trump in particular, for its determination to get out-of-control immigration under something resembling control. Lesson apparently learned.

Left needs new election message

I have a suggestion for the National Democratic Party's 2018- and 2020-election message. Back in 1987, I heard Bill Clinton give a speech in which he said something I really agreed with. He said people have rights and responsibilities. Yet Democrats, he said, seem to focus too heavily on their own "rights" and seem to believe that they shouldn't (and don't) have any "responsibilities." By contrast, he said, Republicans seem to focus too heavily on their "responsibilities" and seem to believe that they shouldn't and don't have any "rights."

When terrorists kidnap, and the options for redress

Since the 1960s, Israel has been extorted by Palestinian terrorist organizations holding Israeli soldiers and civilians hostage, with Lebanese terrorist groups joining in the kidnapping-for-ransom epidemic of Israelis, including Westerners and other nationals in the early 1980s.

In this image made from video released by KRT on Jan. 1, 2018,  North Korean leader Kim Jong-un speaks in his annual address in undisclosed location, North Korea. (KRT via AP Video)  ** FILE **

Democratic dopiness: Lawmaker blames U.S. for North Korea nukes

- The Washington Times

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, a Hawaii Democrat, took to "This Week" on ABC to say that it's America's fault North Korea has nuclear designs. This is typical Democrat logic -- defending chaos and evil at all costs and pointing fingers at any source that detracts from leftist, progressive culpability.

In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, protesters vandalize a police vehicle outside of Ferguson city hall in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Blacks can be racist, too

- The Washington Times

Charles M. Blow, a black New York Times columnist, just wrote a piece for his newspaper that's bluntly titled, "Trump Is a Racist. Period." He arrives at that conclusion by simply saying it -- as if saying something conclusively makes it so.

CORRECTS SPELLING TO DIGGS NOT RIGGS Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) celebrates in the end zone after a game winning touchdown against the New Orleans Saints during the second half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

LOVERRO: Stefon Diggs, NFL give us a game for history

And now the world will wake up Monday morning to the greatness of Stefon Diggs, who pulled down a dramatic game-winning catch with the clock running down to zero and led the Vikings to a 29-24 come-from-behind victory over the New Orleans Saints that they will talk about for years in the land of 10,000 lakes.

Illustration on the penumbra of Constitutional interpretation and abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The deceitful road to abortion

After Roe v. Wade plaintiff Norma McCorvey became a Christian and revealed that she had not been gang raped as her legal team had claimed, many Americans came to understand that this landmark ruling that legalized abortion was based on a lie.

Unfair Trade Practices in Commercial Air Travel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trade cheating in the Middle East

Last month, President Trump laid out his foreign policy doctrine in a speech that emphasized economic security as a key piece of America's national security policy. He called for "trade based on the principles of fairness and reciprocity" and "firm action against unfair trade practices."

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day "progressives," is that taxes don't have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google "Taxes don't matter" and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

In this Oct. 18, 2017 photo, Collinsville High School Latin teacher James Stark speaks to students in his classroom in Collinsville, Ill. Stark views his students' well being as his top priority. Teaching Latin is somewhere down the list. Stark has been a teacher for three years. At 24 years old, he was named the 2017 Illinois Latin Teacher of the Year by the Illinois Classical Conference. His students say they think of Room 225, the Latin classroom, as a sanctuary. (Derik Holtmann /Belleville News-Democrat, via AP)

When student teachers are shunned

The Oklahoma Council for Public Affairs reports that a collective bargaining group representing public schools in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is calling for a boycott of student teachers from the local Christian university. The reason for the proposed shunning? Oklahoma Wesleyan University's president (yours truly) dared to suggest that the bad ideas presently being taught in our nation's schools might, at least in part, be responsible for the bad behavior we are seeing in our national news.

Illustration on New York's climate lawsuit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New York's silly climate suit

On January 10, the city of New York filed suit against BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell. The suit accuses oil companies of causing dangerous climate change and damage to New York City, seeking monetary compensation. But history will rank this action high in the annals of human superstition.

'Refugee funds' don't go to Palestinians

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has exacerbated rather than helped the problems of refugees who still languish in squalid camps after 70 years ("The faded Palestinian issue," Web, Jan. 10).

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