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Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform



In this July 12, 2017 photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. The normally sleepy Senate Ethics Committee hasn't had a major case since 2011, but it could be deciding next year on the fate of three senators _ including two facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation of moral geldings




Why Trump should arm Ukraine



Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow








Related Articles

Illustration on the deadly history of socialism/communism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Socialism's predictable outcomes

- The Washington Times

Despite several horrifying current examples of nations in the grip of socialism, many of America's millennials are happily skipping down the socialist Yellow Brick Road toward an Oz that could never be.

FILE - In this May 14, 2012 file photo, King Salman, left, speaks with his son, now Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, (MBS), as they wait for Gulf Arab leaders ahead of the opening of Gulf Cooperation Council, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The surprise dismissal and arrest of dozens of ministers, royals, officials and senior military officers by MBS late Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017, is unprecedented in the secretive, 85-year-old kingdom. But so is the by-now virtually certain rise to the throne of a 30-something royal who, in another first, is succeeding his father. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)

Interesting times in Arabia

If hard times can make a monkey eat red pepper, as the ancient saying goes, tough times might require Arab and Jew to join forces to bring home the bacon. (Metaphorically speaking, of course.) The reformation of Islam, which stalled in Spain in the 16th century, might be struggling for renewed purchase in Saudi Arabia.

In this April 4, 2012 photo made available by the University of Goteborg in Sweden, the Swedish research team practices before the operations to transplant wombs at the Sahlgrenska Hospital in Goteborg, Sweden. Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives and will soon try to become pregnant, the doctor in charge of the pioneering project has revealed. “This is a new kind of surgery,” Dr. Mats Brannstrom told The Associated Press. Brannstrom is leading the initiative at the University of Goteborg and will run workshops for other doctors on how to perform womb transplants later this year. “We have no textbook to look at,” he said.  (AP Photo/University of Goteborg, Johan Wingborg)

When two heads are better than one

China is thinking big. The Middle Kingdom has already built a small chain of islands in the South China Sea, fortifying them and bids to make them armed fortresses astride the sea lanes connecting Asia to the world. Leaders have to think big, and China obviously wants to replace the United States as the world's superpower.

Players should thank Trump

What were the UCLA basketball players thinking as they were shoplifting merchandise from Louis Vuitton stores in Hangzhou, China? These three could have each gotten a 10-year sentence in a not-so-nice Chinese prison for their moronic stunt. They should thank their lucky stars President Trump was able to work with Chinese president Xi Jinping to secure custody release.

GOP has chance to reform taxes

Too many Republicans excel at joining with Democrats on killing legislation and other critical issues. The Republicans, with a House and Senate majority, have an unprecedented opportunity to pass good, much-needed tax-reform legislation, with a transition period and provision for prompt revision if significant problems occur.

A Chinese danger that must not be taken lightly

Intelligence analysts and media pundits alike are puzzling whether Xi Jinping, president of China, deserves the recent Economist cover calling him the world's most powerful man.

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., pauses during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on nominations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Al Franken's astonishing pardon -- from a feminist, no less

- The Washington Times

Kate Harding, a feminist writer who's penned the book "Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance and Revolution in Trump's America," said that Sen. Al Franken should do penance for his sexual assault -- you know, the one captured in part on camera -- but not resign from political office. Harding's logic? He's a Democrat and his political voice is needed in Washington, D.C., she said. Astonishing.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who said President Clinton should have resigned over his sexual affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky 20 years ago, later defended him. "Things have changed today, and I think under those circumstances there should be a very different reaction," she said. (Associated Press/File)

Democrats' depravity laid bare by Bill Clinton

- The Washington Times

With profiles in courage like Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand in powerful positions of authority around here, is it any wonder that men and women of America are living in such respectful bliss and harmony with one another?

In this Nov. 16, 2017, photo, former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a news conference in Birmingham, Ala., with his wife Kayla Moore, right. A sex scandal has relegated Moore's hard-line positions on LGBT issues to the background in Alabama's turbulent Senate race even as religious activists blame the "LGBT mafia" and "homosexualist gay terrorism" for his precarious political plight. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Brian Kilmeade, Fox Radio, on latest Roy Moore allegations: 'I would kick his head in'

- The Washington Times

Here's a bit that's bound to ratchet all the fiery commentary surrounding Roy Moore even more. During discussion with Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma about a woman who alleged Alabama's Moore called her high school to ask her for a date -- at a time when Moore was in his 30s -- Brian Kilmeade, on his Fox News Radio show, went this side of blunt and said: If that were my daughter, I'd kick Moore in the head.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Al Franken's days are numbered

- The Washington Times

Sen. Al Franken, who was just outed on a photograph wearing a big smile and groping the chest of a journalist while she slept, is now facing growing calls -- many, from within his own liberal-minded ranks -- to resign. This, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles Schumer both agreed to put Franken before the ethics committee fires for review. His days are numbered.

Erika Harold

When a Miss America runs for office

- The Washington Times

It was 2014 and the first time attendees at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference or CPAC got a load of former Miss America Erika Harold who was invited to address the attendees as of one of the most promising young conservatives in the country. She is a black female lawyer from Illinois who had in 2003 been chosen Miss America. She had entered the Miss America pageant hoping to win enough money to go to Harvard Law School and did just that.

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