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U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks at the AARP Presidential Forum at the Waterfront Convention Center in Bettendorf, Iowa on Tuesday, July 16, 2019.  (Olivia Sun/The Des Moines Register via AP) ** FILE **

Time to take a closer look at AARP

For years, progressive politicians and groups have tried to prove the more effective conservative groups are just fronts for monied interests and corporate America. They've alleged time and again, without proof that the National Rifle Association the nation's largest mass membership civil rights group is merely a tool of the firearms industry. Or that certain research and advocacy groups that question climate change at any level are beholden to the oil companies and are doing their bidding in exchange for contributions.

Ginsburg didn't belong on court

The announcement that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died was very unfortunate news. However, I do not ascribe to the theory that she was a stalwart defender of U.S. constitutional law and a "judicial icon." In fact, I believe there is ample evidence she was an enemy of the U.S. Constitution who never should have accepted her appointment to the court, and who thereafter should have been impeached.

Poor management to blame

Mayors and governors are blaming climate change for the massive wild fires throughout the West. It is insulting and clueless to propose new climate laws and regulations while fires are raging, thousands have been evacuated, hundreds have lost their homes and businesses, and too many souls have lost their lives.

Fill vacancy with conservative

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid famously said, after being questioned regarding having lied about Mitt Romney paying taxes, "Romney didn't win, did he?" Now President Trump has a chance to fill another Supreme Court seat and the Democrats are calling foul.

Bryson DeChambeau, of the United States, reacts after sinking a putt for par on the 18th hole to win the US Open Golf Championship, Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020, in Mamaroneck, N.Y. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)  **FILE**

DeChambeau's big drives reignite golf's distance debate

- Associated Press

If the future of golf was on display Sunday at Winged Foot, it's one a lot of people in the game can do without. A beefed-up DeChambeau overwhelmed a venerable golf course in a way that was once as unimaginable as playing a U.S. Open with no spectators.

A structure is destroyed by an advancing wildfire, Monday, July 30, 2018, in Finley, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

If Americans don't spruce up their forests, Mother Nature will

Forests afire as far as the eye can see have become a common, heartbreaking occurrence in the American West when summer fades into autumn. The devastation hits hardest those residents who must breathe in smoke for months on end and, sometimes, face fleeing the infernos. Some are quick to blame the flames on human-caused climate change, but the destruction will persist without recognition of human-caused failure to manage the wilderness environment.

Parliament, not George, taxed us

I was impressed by Judge Napolitano's piece on James Madison and the Constitution ("Governor's authoritarian orders during pandemic ruled unconstitutional," Web, Sept. 16). In this case, however, Mr. Napolitano makes a serious error. He writes that the American Revolution was about "the British king because he taxed without representation " This is simply inaccurate and I would guess that Mr. Napolitano, upon reflection, would agree.

Election should focus on pandemic

As always, the rhetorical ability to set the agenda in the waning days of the presidential campaign will determine the outcome of the 2020 election. Yes, whether the president and Republicans try to replace Ruth Bader Ginsberg before January is a serious issue, full of intrigue and speculation by political pundits and the media. Former President Clinton and others perceive this move as a power grab. It also exposes the hypocrisy of Republicans who set a clear precedent in 2016 by insisting that a Supreme Court selection should wait until the next president was selected by voters.

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