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Colorado Rockies' Trevor Story fields a ground out hit by Oakland Athletics' Jed Lowrie during the second inning of a spring training baseball game, Tuesday, March 23, 2021, in Mesa, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York) **FILE**

Rule changes to make baseball more watchable can't come soon enough

- Associated Press

That baseball is in serious need of change isn't really in dispute. Even the most rabid fans grumble that the game is stagnant and one dimensional, sorely missing the strategies and nuances that in days past made it America's favorite pastime.

More gun-control laws not the answer

President Biden has jumped on another mass killing as an opportunity to push gun-control laws ("Biden eyes executive action to impose new gun control measures," Web, March 23). Mr. Biden's partner in crime, Barack Obama, has called those who oppose the laws they want "cowardly." In my experience, those who call others names have no rational response.

Miller-Meeks won, fair and square

Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks was elected to Congress by a six-vote margin. Her opponent lost every election challenge she mounted. Mrs. Miller-Meeks was seated and has served in the House since Jan. 3 — yet Democrats in the House seek to remove her pursuant to the power of the House to judge the "election" of its members under Article I, Section 5 of the U.S. Constitution. The House Democrats are not judging Mrs. Miller-Meeks under the election clause; they are trying to expel her from Congress.

China has noted Biden weakness

The Communist government of China has no second thoughts about the efficacy of its form of governance, nor does it sense that its approach to international affairs will stumble against the Biden administration ("'No way to strangle China': Fiery rhetoric, clashes besiege U.S., Beijing at Alaska meeting," Web, March 18). It must feel that Barack Obama's policy of leading from behind is regnant once again now that the in-your-face Trump unpleasantness has passed.

FILE - In this March 18, 2021, file photo, a student listens to a presentation in Health class at Windsor Locks High School in Windsor Locks, Conn. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention relaxed its social distancing guidelines for schools Friday, March 19, saying students can now sit 3 feet apart in classrooms. The new guidelines also remove recommendations for plastic shields or other barriers between desks. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

Freeing education from housing

Virginia Walden Ford and her twin sister, Harrietta, were among the first 130 students to desegregate the high schools in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Bikers ride up and down Main Street in Daytona, Fla., during the start of Bike Week on Friday, March 5, 2021. (Sam Thomas /Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The media is the real 'Super Spreader' ... of fear

This past weekend the news was filled with stories of thousands of spring breakers failing to adhere to a Miami Beach COVID-19 induced 8 p.m. curfew. These maskless college kids were bound and determined to enjoy their spring break after spending a year in some sort of restriction or outright isolation.

President Joe Biden talks to members of the press before boarding Air Force One on departure from John Glenn Columbus International Airport, Tuesday, March 23, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Press conference questions Biden should be asked (but likely won't be)

- The Washington Times

President Joseph R. Biden will conduct his first press conference Thursday - after 64 days being in office and continually ducking the media's questions. The press should hold Mr. Biden accountable and dive into his policy decisions in order to extract details and new information for the public, without fear or favor.

The Case for Afghanistan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The fall of Bala Murghab and Afghanistan's future

The Afghan government recently announced that its forces had withdrawn from the Bala Murghab district center in the remote Afghan province of Badghis and ceded it to the Taliban.

In this Oct. 2, 2018, file photo, semi-automatic rifles fill a wall at a gun shop in Lynnwood, Wash. Mass shootings in Georgia and Colorado in March 2021, that left several people dead, have reignited calls from gun control advocates for tighter restrictions on buying firearms and ammunition. But with Democrats in control of the federal government, gun rights advocates have been persuading Republican-run state legislatures to go the other way, making it easier to obtain and carry guns. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

Democrats and their 'double standards' on guns

- The Washington Times

Republican Sen. John Kennedy blasted Democrats for having a "double standard" on guns that goes like this: "If a bad guy shoots a cop, it's the gun's problem; if a cop shoots a bad guy, it's the cop's fault," he said. Great point. The "double standard" goes even deeper, though.

Compassion is for the law-abiding

Compassion does not remedy lawless behavior ("Biden's illegal immigration agenda creates another child smuggling crisis," Web, March 15). Illegal immigration is lawlessness. The word illegal means contrary or forbidden by law.

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