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Biden Can't Win Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Biden can’t win




In this Feb. 20, 2019, photo a worker carries interior doors to install in a just completed new home in north Dallas. On Wednesday, March 13, the Commerce Department reports on U.S. construction spending in January.  (AP Photo/LM Otero) **FILE**

Give manual labor a chance

- The Washington Times




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Illustration on the attitude of gratitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Grateful for spring and other things

The warm winds of spring have begun, at least in the Mid-Atlantic region. Migrating birds and butterflies are fluttering into newly leafy trees and bushes before heading farther North.

Total Factor Productivity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Edging closer to a trade deal

The United States and China are edging closer to finalizing a trade deal that should end the tariff penalties that are at the heart of a year-old trade war.

Illustration on President Trump's auto tariffs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The tariffs nobody wants

In almost every case, whenever a tariff or quota is imposed on imports that tax is strongly supported by the domestic industry getting the protective shield from lower-priced foreign competition. The sugar industry supports sugar tariffs; textile mills lobby for tariffs on foreign clothing. The steel industry and the aluminum makers are getting rich off of the high taxes on imported metals.

Illustration on ending the war in Afghanistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the endless war in Afghanistan

When President Donald Trump addressed a joint session of Congress last month for his second State of the Union address, he made a poignant observation that triggered rousing applause from many in the chamber: "Great nations do not fight endless wars."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers remarks at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Thursday, March 7, 2019. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press via AP)

Canada stands tall

Despite enormous contrary pressure, including the taking of Canadian hostages in China, Canada is demonstrating once more reason why it is regarded as one of America's most reliable allies.

Mourning senseless murders

The case of Christopher Watts captured worldwide attention ("Colorado man discloses details about killing wife, daughters," Web, March 7). Social media has buzzed with discussion groups. The horrific and sudden obliteration of these innocent victims at the hands of their husband and father was unfathomable.

Climate change cause not settled

The mainstream media, and now conservative media, too, have adopted the term "climate change deniers" or "doubters" for any scientists who have data that does not support all levels of the contention that global warming or climate change is "real, dire and man-made." The mainstream media is proficient in coining names for things to give a negative connotation to anyone not accepting of their preferred spin on an issue.

Ending an evil man's murderous reign

Mexican drug lord Joaqun "El Chapo' Guzman, once the world's most wanted man, was convicted of drug trafficking charges last month in New York and he will be sentenced this coming June.

Eric Holder: The best reason to vote Republican in 2020

- The Washington Times

Eric Holder, with his call for a Democratic president to add seats to the U.S. Supreme Court, just gave Republicans one of the best political talking points for the coming elections. Why? He basically told America that if Democrats win the White House, we'll un-Americanly manipulate the courts so conservatives will be stifled for decades to comes.

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., walks to the chamber Thursday, March 7, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington, as the House was preparing to vote on a resolution to speak out against, as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said, "anti-Semitism, anti-Islamophobia, anti-white supremacy and all the forms that it takes," an action sparked by remarks from Omar. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Stupid House resolution on 'anti-Semitism' is just so stupid

- The Washington Times

So the House, under Speaker Nancy Pelosi's leadership, responded to anti-Semitic comments made by a member of the Democratic Party by passing a resolution condemning hate. How stupid. We needed a winnowing stick. A nun's ruler, even. Instead, we got a vanilla ice cream cone. A silly document that says, in essence, hate is bad.

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., walks to the chamber Thursday, March 7, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington, as the House was preparing to vote on a resolution to speak out against, as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, "anti-Semitism, anti-Islamophobia, anti-white supremacy and all the forms that it takes," an action sparked by remarks from Omar. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Ilhan Omar steps in anti-Semitic mud once again

- The Washington Times

Rep. Ilhan Omar, fresh off a week of self-imposed controversy, has now stepped in it once again. When Meghan McCain of "The View" got a bit emotional while pointing out the "scary" long-term implications of Omar's anti-Semitic views, the lawmaker retweeted a message that pretty much went like this: Oh, knock it off, willya?

Robert Burns Portrait by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Robbie Burns in Richmond

The unmistakable skirl of a bagpipe announced dinner, and bagpiper Tim MacLeod, resplendent in full highland attire, entered the great dining room of Dover Hall, as a hundred guests in kilts, skirts, scarves and bowties in the plaids of various clans waited for the opening of Burns Night.

Illustration on the need for FDA reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What ought to happen next at FDA

Scott Gottlieb gave — in a move no one publicly seems to have anticipated — notice on Tuesday he would be stepping down as Food and Drug commissioner.

In this Dec. 18, 2018, file photo, then Rep. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., waits to speak during a news conference at the Capitol in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York) ** FILE **

Some old rages return to ride again

- The Washington Times

There's no new thing under the sun, as Ecclesiastes tells us, and the politics of the nation proves it. A senator's declaration that she was raped many years ago recalls the struggle of feminists to send women into combat. Some of the arguments survive to be ventilated again.

Illustration on trade gap realities by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Assessing the trade gaps, fairly

Never has so much promising news about U.S. trade, and President Trump's progress in bringing the nation's trade deficits under control, been so deeply buried in an official economic report as in Wednesday's Census Bureau release on America's trade performance for last December, and for full-year 2018.

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