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Demonstrators gathered at Floyd Light City Park on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020 in Portland, Ore.  Protests turned violent again even after the mayor pleaded with demonstrators to stay off the streets. Police say an officer suffered what was described as a severe injury after being hit with a rock late Thursday. (Mark Graves /The Oregonian via AP)  **FILE**

What will organized criminal violence bring next to our streets?

- The Washington Times

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Joe Biden hasn't the stamina for four years

- The Washington Times

The reason Joe Biden's pick for vice president is being watched so closely is that most voters think he won't make it through a full four-year White House term and that it's his second-in-charge who will ultimately lead the country. That's not anecdotal, water-cooler gossip. That's polled fact. So says Rasmussen in its latest survey.

Teacher Union Blackmail Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Teachers want to teach, Marxist unions want to blackmail

Teachers are essential workers. But America's teachers -- who are public servants paid by public dollars -- are AWOL during a national crisis. Don't get us wrong. We're not here to bash good teachers. We are good teachers.

Foreign price controls for prescriptions and medicine illustration by The Washington Times

'President Trump, avoid foreign price controls for medicine'

"Setting price controls at below-market rates," the economists wrote, "leads to shortages, squeezes the cost bubble toward some other portion of the economy, and imposes a deadweight cost on society."

In this Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019, photo, philanthropist and co-chairman of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Bill Gates gestures as he speaks to the audience during the Global Fund to Fight AIDS event at the Lyon's congress hall, central France. (Ludovic Marin/Pool Photo via AP) ** FILE **

Bill Gates whines Team Trump won't listen to him

- The Washington Times

Bill Gates is the smartest guy in the room, nay, on the planet, and he wants everybody to know it. How else to explain his feigned incredulity on CNN of America's coronavirus test process to that of other nations? Let's remember: Gates is a computer guy. He's not actually a medical expert.

Billions on Trident, terrorists walk

The United Kingdom has not ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), passed by the U.N. General Assembly in 2017. In fact, the U.K. even boycotted the negotiations leading to the creation of the treaty. However, the U.K. has ratified the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The reason for this seeming ambiguity is that the TPNW is a more far-ranging agreement than the NPT. Among other things, the TPNW prohibits even the stockpiling of nuclear weapons. The NPT mostly focuses on preventing other states from acquiring nuclear weapons.

School or no, work goes on

The debate over re-opening schools and whether to go online or face-to-face has fallen along party lines. What is not discussed is the fact that a significant portion of the population still goes to work every day. They are medical personnel, police officers and firefighters, as well as owners and employees of large and small businesses. Kids are out playing in groups and then going home to all these parents who have been at work.

FILE - In this July 22, 2020, file photo, a man takes a coronavirus test at a mobile site at the Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science, in Los Angeles. California has stopped updating a list of counties facing more restrictions on businesses and schools after a problem in the state's coronavirus testing database has led to an undercount. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Coronavirus test positives a big whoop over nothing

- The Washington Times

Every day, every hour, every news source in America blasts out the latest coronavirus test case positives. But -- and this is a serious question -- so what? If this were a virus by a different name, if this were a different political climate, test positives wouldn't raise national eyebrows.

China Bailout Clause Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How COVID-19 affects U.S.-China trade deal

The impact of the pandemic on trade negotiations has not gone unnoticed; according to President Donald Trump, "We made a great trade deal. But as soon as the deal was done, the ink wasn't even dry, and they hit us with the plague."

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