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Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX





Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy



FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate


A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers







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Illustration on the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Vindication for a whistleblower

What fools (and hypocrites) these mortals be. Two decades have passed since Linda Tripp blew the whistle on sexual hijinks in high places with her tapes of Monica Lewinsky, the young intern, describing to her confidant and colleague the passionate ordeal of a sexual liaison with the president of the United States. She blew the whistle, she says, to protect her friend, but 20 years on she's still a villain for many women who remember those times.

FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, people stand in line near an Apple Store at an outdoor shopping mall in Beijing, China. On Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018, Apple announced it is planning to build another corporate campus and hire 20,000 workers during the next five years as part of a $350 billion commitment to the U.S. economy. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

Apple brings it home

The announcement on Wednesday that Apple Inc. will bring $350 billion in cash parked overseas — that's billion with a B — home to the United States, to invest here and create as many as 20,000 new jobs, is likely to be the economic story of the year.

Terrorists are not welcome here

In the recent Washington Times news article ("American-born children of immigrants proving fruitful recruiting ground for jihad in U.S., Web) it would have been interesting if the Department of Homeland Security would have broken down the statistic that "75 percent of terrorists convicted in the U.S. are foreign born" to include ethnic origin and citizenship. Certainly there are gangs of drug sellers and murderers within their own communities who should never have been allowed into this nation.

'The Russian people knew they were being lied to'

From the beginning, Americans have been taught that a free press is essential to the well-being of our democracy. And that has proved true, time and time again. But that truth seems uniquely threatened today, as the organs of our major media increasingly subscribe to an ideological, political and cultural group-think, more Orwellian than Stalinist, but equally insidious.

A First Amendment threat

The U.S. Supreme Court is currently considering a case, the National Institute of Family Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra. From all indications, virtually none of the American public is aware of this vitally important case.

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2016 file photo, Godfrey Dillard, left, and Perry Wallace take part in a lecture at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.  Wallace, who broke down a racial barrier by becoming the first black varsity basketball player in the Southeastern Conference, has died. He was 69. Wallace's death was announced Friday, Dec. 1, 2017,  by Vanderbilt University, where Wallace became an all-SEC player and remains among the Commodores' all-time rebounding leaders. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File) **FILE**

SNYDER: Sports can teach 'uncomfortable truths' about race and society

Athletic competition can teach us a lot. Through sports, we're able to learn about athletes and fans, as well as coaches and owners. The most obvious lessons center on principles like sacrifice, dedication and commitment. No one comes close to, or reaches, championships without paying a price, whether in team or individual sports.

In this Oct, 28, 2014, file photo, flowers surround a photo of slain Sacramento County Deputy Sheriff Daniel Oliver at the Sacramento County Sheriff's office in Sacramento, Calif. Luis Enrique Monroy Bracamontes, the suspect being tried in the slayings of  Oliver and Scott Brown, called Brown a "coward" as his murder trial began on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Illegal charged with cop-killing: 'Wish I had killed more'

- The Washington Times

An illegal immigrant facing murder charges for the killing of two law enforcement officers in Northern California went off the rails during his court hearing and said, with a grin on his face, "I wish I had killed more," Fox News reported. This is what the sanctuary-loving left wants to shelter from the deportation storm?

In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, left, sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Va. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

DOJ, in rare but welcome move, petitions SCOTUS to end DACA

- The Washington Times

The Department of Justice is petitioning the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a federal judge's ruling on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a rare intervention that could finally hand the White House a win on the Barack Obama-implemented program. Good. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is right to wage a fight on this. The idea that a former president's executively issued command that wrongfully skirted Congress is now hard and fast U.S. law is a bit much to stomach.

Illustration on the varied content of private conversations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good news vs. private conversations

Last week the headlines should have abounded with the year's good news. It was the economy: GDP up some 3 percent and for the last quarter nearly 4 percent, unemployment down to a 17-year low and black unemployment at the lowest level since such statistics were compiled. The stock market was soaring, up some 42 percent since Donald Trump was elected, and inflation was low. It was the best Christmas season in years.

Illustration on the need for a bipartisan immigration deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The president's speech

Much of my so-called career as a foreign correspondent was spent in countries that could accurately be described with the scatological adjective allegedly uttered by President Trump last week.

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