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Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media


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A Little Love for Roy Moore Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another perspective on Roy Moore

Roy Moore's name is indelibly linked to sexual predation; but do you know the specific accusations and accusers? Quite a number of women say that Mr. Moore asked them out when they were aged 16 to 18, and that he got their parents' permission to do so. All this, 26 to 40 years ago. It's worth looking carefully at the claims and the evidence.

Illustration on the benefits of the GOP tax reform plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democratic tax-cut doomsayers

Earlier this week House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi predicted somewhat apocalyptically that passage of the Republican tax bill would quite simply mean "the end of the world." It is true that the lady from the Bay is given to hyperbolic overstatement, but she seems to see herself as the leader of a party and movement that views those who disagree with them as bent upon destruction, murder and, yes, ending the world.

Illustration on diplomacy and economic sanctions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Gauging the impact of economic sanctions

Carl von Clausewitz thought of military war as a continuation of diplomacy through other means. Economic sanctions are economic war and should be similarly regarded as tactics subordinated to a diplomatic strategy.

Illustration on the history of American money, banks and debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How America blazed a trail for government debt

As the United States faces a national debt of more than $20 trillion as a result of profligate spending — and looks to raise that ante with tax cuts — it should be noted that this untoward policy was begun exactly 327 years ago on Dec. 10. Massachusetts became the first colony to borrow money by issuing a paper currency — and the first in the history of Western Civilization (the Chinese were actually the inventors, putting forth notes as early as 806 A.D.).

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by, from left, Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., speaks to a group of small business owners as Republicans work to pass their sweeping tax bill, a blend of generous tax cuts for businesses and more modest tax cuts for families and individuals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The fiscal mess that tax cuts won't fix

We've heard a lot of frightening figures in the last week or so as the Senate approved a tax cut bill that is now in a conference with the House to iron out big differences between the two versions.

Isabel Archer's life beyond 'Portrait'

If you have not read Henry James' "Portrait of a Lady," you may have a hard time getting into John Banville's "Mrs. Osmond." It picks up the tale of Isabel Archer, now Mrs. Gilbert Osmond, pretty much where James had left her. She had defied her husband and gone to England to see her dying cousin Ralph.

Illustration of Elizabeth Warren by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pow Wow politics at Harvard Yard

Donald Trump thinks of himself as the comedian-in-chief reprising Elizabeth Warren as the butt of his pointed political satire. To her consternation, he draws chuckles if not guffaws calling the Massachusetts senator "Pocahontas," the celebrated squaw of early American history, needling her for inventing Cherokee ancestors just to claim a diversification slot on the Harvard faculty. "Fake ancestry," he might call it.

Illustration on Middle East peace by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to Jared Kushner

President Trump's son-in-law and designated Middle East peace envoy, Jared Kushner, told the Brookings Institution's Saban Forum last weekend that a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians is key to solving larger goals, such as stopping Iranian aggression and Islamic extremism.

Illustration on Dennis Rodman and diplomacy with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Dennis Rodman defense

On this, the 76th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, I am accompanying former basketball star and accidental diplomat Dennis Rodman on a visit to Guam. Like Hawaii was in 1941, Guam is an American territory with strategic military importance, home to around 7,000 brave American military personnel. And like Hawaii in 1941, Guam has been threatened by a foreign adversary. Instead of Gen. Tojo, Guam has been targeted by Marshal Kim Jong-un of North Korea, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, as a target for their potentially nuclear-armed missile strikes.

Education Savings Accounts for Californians Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A golden opportunity for California students

Whether Congress enacts a federal elementary and secondary education savings account (ESA) program as part of its tax reform package is anybody's guess. Yet one thing's for certain: The states shouldn't wait for Congress to expand educational options — especially California.

Affordable Pharmaceuticals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making drugs more affordable with the Creates Act

The politicians who set out to fix America's health care system ended up making many things worse. This is no surprise. It's the Washington way. Costs are still rising, even for those of us who've reached the age where Medicare has stepped in and become our primary insurance.

Two people prepare to ride the world's longest urban zip line, with a speed of up to 80 kilometers per hour on a one kilometer run from 170 meter to ground level, in the Marina district of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

How the Dubai miracle was realized

The Great Recession of 2008-09 convinced me, like many other observers, that the city-state of Dubai's razzmatazz — Go skiing in the boiling heat! Gawk at the world's tallest building! — was but a desert mirage. I lambasted Dubai in a 2009 article for "hucksterism and fast talk," running a "trompe l'oeil economy," and suckering outsiders with Ponzi-scheme real estate deals. It appeared to be only a matter of time until the whole edifice collapsed.

Advertisement from the Archdiocese of Washington rejected by the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority.

Rejecting 'the perfect gift'

The rate at which Christmas is being leached of spiritual meaning and replaced with frenzied online shopping isn't increasing fast enough for some.

Out of this world, but not as fine as its predecessor

You can count on an Andy Weir novel to be out of this world. He took us to the Red Planet in his phenomenally successful, mind-blowing debut novel, "The Martian." Now, in his second one, "Artemis," he sends us to the moon.

Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Snookering the dealmaker

- The Washington Times

The coming government shutdown that at least some congressional leaders are working hard to avoid was predicted by many when President Trump sidestepped congressional Republicans to cut a deal with Democratic leaders last fall. The deal was celebrated in the media and elated a president desperate for good press, but left Republicans worrying about what the White House gave up for a few headlines.

Illustration on the troubles started by Hillary Clinton's claims of Russian interference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russia's influence spreads

Last week we discovered that former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn lied to the FBI about the import of what he told them regarding his contacts with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Yet Mr. Flynn once served as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency during the presidency of Barack Obama. Why would he lie to the FBI about what passed between him and Mr. Kislyak? Had he forgotten that, for a certitude, the conversation of a Russian ambassador was being recorded secretly by American intelligence agencies? Moreover, when he was being interviewed by the FBI, why did he not bring with him a lawyer? When I was being interviewed by the FBI about my perfidious Arkansas Project, I most certainly brought a lawyer with me, and it helped that my lawyer looked like he once worked for Don Corleone. Thinking back on it, I should have brought two lawyers.

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