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Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media


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Old-fashioned Dinner Romance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Counterculture alternatives to soulless hook-ups

My two eldest children are in college, and listening to them talk about intimate relationships among their peers can be frightening. These days, young men and women seem to relate to each other chiefly in superficial, anatomic ways, too often fueled by heavy drinking. Disturbingly high rates of sexually transmitted diseases, rampant pornography addiction and casual sex that leaves girls feeling used and depressed are the most obvious results. But students have also lost ineffable things like the rites of romance and courtship that used to make the years of dating a sweet interlude on the way to stable marriages and happy families.

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the Vestavia Hills Public library, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. According to a Washington Post story Nov. 9, an Alabama woman said Moore made inappropriate advances and had sexual contact with her when she was 14. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

The unraveling culture

The times are not just "a'changing," as Bob Dylan sang of them — but they're unraveling. Dismembering of the culture is at hand, and only the blind and foolish cannot see it. History is trashed and anyone who objects is a bigot, or worse. Pale-skinned Americans are vilified for living innocent lives, exploiting "white privilege." Bulls-eyes are painted on the backs of conservatives and Republicans because, well, they're conservatives and Republicans. Every man is a sexual predator, or will be soon. Throwing brickbats at unpopular targets can be great fun, but what goes around comes around.

A statesman in life, forgotten in death

History is unkind to compromisers. If they succeed, disaster is averted and the compromiser is soon forgotten. If they fail, they're often scapegoated for subsequent events. Neville Chamberlain, the British prime minister whose negotiations averted war with Hitler over Czechoslovakia comes to mind. Chamberlain thought his concessions had brought "peace in our time."

Tremors in the Saudi Arabian Kingdom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The destabilization of Saudi Arabia

A wide variety of threats, ranging from intensifying proxy wars and hostile neighbors to the purge of prominent individuals, seems to be destabilizing the House of Saud.

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, right, leaves the Fort Bragg courtroom facility as the judge deliberates in a sentencing hearing at Fort Bragg, N.C., Friday, Nov. 3, 2017. Bergdahl, who walked off his base in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held by the Taliban for five years, pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

The Bergdahl liberals

I thought later about the women's admiration of Mr. Obama while reading about Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl's light, dishonorable discharge without incarceration for leaving his post in 2009 and causing severe injuries and possibly related deaths of several fellow soldiers in Afghanistan. Sgt. Bergdahl's return was procured by Mr. Obama in 2014 in exchange for five Taliban commanders who have gone back to plotting the destruction of the United States and our allies.

Illustration on child tax credits by Linas Garsys/ The Washington Times

Investing in long-term prosperity

Though we don't agree on the overall tax package being debated in Washington, we do agree that Congress should act to increase the value of and access to the child tax credit and the child and dependent care tax credit for families with children ages 0-5 as key steps in helping low- and middle-income working families and investing in our country's long-term prosperity.

Illustration on William Carey    The Washington Times

When Reformers traveled to India, China and Korea

In the U.S. and Europe, churches dedicated entire services and sermon series to the subject, tracing their theological history back to Oct. 31, 1517, Reformation Day. In Germany, where the date was declared a national holiday, more than 2 million people from across the world pilgrimaged to Wittenberg, the birthplace of the Reformation, to breathe the air of the historic occasion.

Illustration on failed effort to cut taxes by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The flawed House tax plan

The House Republican tax bill faces a tough climb to passage because it simply won't deliver the kind of growth the administration claims and it distributes benefits unfairly.

Deconstructing the myths of the Arab-Israeli conflict

There are few countries in the world that produce an emotional response quite like Israel. From its birth as a modern nation in 1948, this country has faced everything from preserving ancient history to threats of annihilation by its worst enemies.

In this Friday, Oct. 27, 2017 photo, good samaritans of the town of Isabela make a circle of prayer with the residents of Rio Abajo in Utuado as recovery efforts from Hurricane Maria continue in Puerto Rico. (David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP)

The power of charity over government

- The Washington Times

TJX Companies, Inc., the corporate owners of Marshalls, T.J. Maxx and HomeGoods, announced just recently that even though its shops' doors have been closed for more than six weeks in hurricane-plagued Puerto Rico, all its employees will still be paid. This is how America rolls.

Building a mystery around law school debt

At the end of the author's note in this, his 39th novel, he tells readers that "The question all writers hate is: 'Where do you get your ideas?' But then he answers it -- "I read an article in the September 2014 edition of the Atlantic titled 'The Law School Scam.' It's a fine investigative piece by Paul Campos. By the end of it I was inspired and knew I had my next novel. Thank you, Mr. Campos."

Illustration on Iran's attacks on the Kurds in Iraq by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Smashing a critical American ally

On Oct. 16, Iranian-backed Shia militias, together with 9,000 Iraqi government forces, armed and trained by the U.S., invaded and took Kirkuk from the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga fighters.

Illustration on Veterans Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Honoring America's veterans

"Freedom or Death." That was the password issued by Gen. George Washington as he and the Colonial Army prepared to cross the Delaware River to unleash a surprise attack on the Hessian soldiers camped in Trenton, N.J. What was at stake that infamous day? The answer: the very freedom of our nation. The Colonial Army were our first veterans.

Illustration on the changing political demographic of the state of Virginia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The slugfest in the Old Dominion

Virginia Republicans were licking their wounds this week after a humiliating election beating from the Democrats who swept every statewide elective office on the ballot.

Illustration on Mark Cuban by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

When disruption equals opportunity

Mark Cuban hinted to Harvey Levin on Sunday's "Objectified" that he is looking at running against President Trump in 2020 as a Republican, as he is fiercely "independent" and believes that there is a place in the GOP for someone who is "socially a centrist but fiscally conservative."

On Nov. 11, 1989, East German border guards are seen through a gap in the Berlin Wall after demonstrators pulled down a segment of the wall at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The day the Berlin Wall came crumbling down

What were you watching on Thursday, Nov. 9, 1989? For me, Nov. 9, 1989, was about watching the most significant political moment of my lifetime, the crashing down of the Iron Curtain and the fall of Russian Communism, on television from my home in rural Iowa.

Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment just ain't what it used to be

Harvey Weinstein, who governed from the casting couch as the Stalinist emperor of Hollywood, is toppled now, done in by regiments of women who came forward with endless tales of malignant abuse. The man who made the movies worthy of 300 Oscar nominations, a man regarded in Hollywood as coming in "just after Steven Spielberg and right before God," may go on trial that could cost him his freedom. Rarely has success receded so swiftly.

All Credit No Cash Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Backing Fannie and Freddie with funny money

Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Director Mel Watt recently made an urgent plea for Congress to decide on a long-term strategy for the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, now in their 10th year of conservatorship overseen by his agency.

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