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Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media


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Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump's recent offer to Vietnam's President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

A savvy guide to investing, geared toward the young

This is a book about investing, aimed primarily at potential young investors -- although investors of all ages can benefit from it -- written by a longtime and notably successful investor.

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It's bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It's intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the antiquated Communucations Act of 1934 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why America needs an updated Communications Act

Congress needs to update the Communications Act of 1934. In 2014, Republican Reps. Fred Upton and Greg Walden started a congressional review process, using the #CommActUpdate handle. Now almost four years later, it's time for Congress to get the job done by overhauling the statute in a way that constrains the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) authority to substitute burdensome bureaucratic mandates for marketplace freedom.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America's government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

Massachusetts members of the electoral college are sworn in at the Statehouse in Boston, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. The eleven members have officially cast their votes for Democrat presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

When oversight becomes overreach

Donald Trump was elected with an electoral vote victory, despite a popular vote defeat. How ironic, then, that he would institute a federal fraud commission that is helping to undermine the principles upon which the Electoral College was founded.

Democrats Miss the Tax Cut Ride Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The left is right to fear Trump's tax cuts

Liberals fear President Trump's tax cuts more than any of his policies. This explains the left's virulent opposition and that it will only increase as tax cuts approach enactment. The reason: Tax cuts offer Mr. Trump and Republicans greater political and economic potential than any other proposal.

Illustration on nostalgia for Communism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Came the revolution

My political orientation has evolved slowly over decades. With one exception: I became anti-Soviet and anti-Communist overnight. More quickly than that, actually.

Target of the Democrats Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the migraine for Republicans

It has long been my conviction that Democrats are the more adept pols, the most tireless pols, the most political pols. I have said that their political libido is that of a nymphomaniac. By that I mean to compliment them, at least to compliment their political skills. The political libido of the Republicans is by comparison the political libido of a Victorian lady, complete with white gloves and parasol.

A former James Bond says goodbye

Although I much prefer Sean Connery's dark and dangerous portrayal of Ian Fleming's iconic character James Bond to Sir Roger Moore's light and comedic approach, I was a huge fan of Mr. Moore's portrayal of Leslie Charteris' Simon Templar in the 1960s TV series "The Saint."

In this Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump feeds carps with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before their working lunch at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Japan. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

The myth of the Republican exodus

- The Washington Times

There's a lot of media talk lately about all the Republicans who are leaving office, refusing to seek re-election, resigning for some new venture or another -- and the talk of the town is that these pols are leaving in some sort of mixture of disgust, horror and sadness at the direction the party's taking, post-President Donald Trump. But this is a bit of faked news.

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a family photo during the ASEAN-U.S. 40th Anniversary commemorative Summit in Manila, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. (Manan Vatsyayana/Pool Photo via AP)

Coming home from an Asian tutorial

- The Washington Times

No one should be rude. Bad manners are not nice. Doesn't everybody's mama teach him that? Donald Trump certainly knows how to overdo it, but sometimes a president must be strategically rude to make a necessary point.

Illustration on worldly society and the debasement of the gospel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The corruption of faith

When Jim Zeigler, the state auditor of Alabama, invoked the Bible to defend Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore against allegations that he had inappropriate contact with underage girls while single and in his 30s (which Mr. Moore has sort of denied), it signaled perhaps the final stage in the corruption of American evangelicalism.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Nov. 14, 2017.

Making a tax cut affordable

The folks in Washington have a knack for almost always asking the wrong question, and then coming up with an answer that makes things worse. The current debate about tax reform is a prime example. Many Democratic critics, some Republican critics (mainly from the conservative side), and many in the media argue that we cannot "afford" a tax cut. In reality, we cannot afford not to cut tax rates.

Illustration on Republicans and the enduring fiscal cliff by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Testing Republican spending restraint

Why would a Republican House, a Republican Senate and a Republican president repeal the best weapon against runaway federal spending in 30 years?

John Bolton Speech to North Korea in 2003.

Sticking it to Trumpian critics of North Korea

President Trump's speech to the South Korean parliament on the evil of the Kim Jong-un regime was the best so far of his presidency and has been widely described as "Reaganesque."

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