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Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media


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Removing Obama Net Neutrality Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring a light touch to Internet regulations

Over the last two weeks, there has been a vigorous debate about internet regulation. Under the plan I recently proposed, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) would restore internet freedom by rolling back heavy-handed government regulations imposed during the Obama administration. Some have tried to whip Americans into a frenzy by making outlandish claims. Feeding the hysteria are silly accusations that the plan will "end the internet as we know it" or threaten American democracy itself.

Illustration on the danger of an EMP attack by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Death by stupidity?

America's epitaph may be: "Died of stupidity."

Illustration on Democrat objections to a tax cut by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A tax cut America can afford

Republican congressional leaders appear likely to pass tax reforms and cuts that the country needs and can afford — but whose benefits Democrats can hardly bear to face.

The Crony Castes of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When greed meets globalization

America's latest Clinton scandal — the 2010 sale of U.S. uranium to a Russian-controlled mining company, which allegedly benefited the Clinton Foundation to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars — has reminded me of the old proverb that says the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil.

An unsettling tale of letting happiness slip by

One doesn't have to read very far into this novel to realize that Victor Forde, Mr. Doyle's unhappy protagonist, doesn't believe in much of anything, either. As he tells us in what may or may not be the words of a trustworthy narrator, Victor is -- was -- semi-famous throughout Ireland for two things.

Colin Kaepernick attends the 2017 ACLU SoCal's Bill of Rights Dinner at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Colin Kaepernick, bogus hero of the left

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick is riding high, having just won the Sports Illustrated Muhammad Ali Legacy Award as well as the American Civil Liberties Union's Eason Monroe Courageous Advocate Award -- honors bestowed, respectively, for sportsmanship and bravery. But Kaepernick is possessed of neither. He's more a tool -- a tool of false leftist beliefs.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Robert Mueller's mighty tuna shrinks to a goldfish

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller has the heart of a Las Vegas hooker and the guile of a New Orleans stripper. Not to push the metaphor too far, he's skilled at showing a little skin in a cloud of satin and lace, but never quite comes across with what the customer is paying for.

Bitcoin and Government Monopoly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The end of government monopoly money

After two centuries of government monopoly money, private monies are re-emerging and will likely come to dominate ultimately. Back in 1976, Nobel Laureate F.A. Hayek published his little classic, "Denationalization of Money." In essence, Hayek argued that money is no different than other commodities, and it would be better supplied by competition among private issuers than by a government monopoly. His book detailed the problems with government monopoly money and how most of these problems could be overcome with private competition.

Illustration on reducing the size of government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Starving the beast

One way to kill a predatory animal is to deny it sustenance. The tax-cut bill passed by the Senate, if it clears a conference with the House and President Trump signs it, may be the first step toward starving the big-government beast.

Artistic freedom in a cake at stake

Jack Phillips is an artist. He has always loved drawing, sculpting and painting. Designing custom wedding cakes allowed him to do all three in a setting that inspired him as a person of faith. And Jack excelled at his work. The local newspaper called his shop "an art gallery of cakes," and his designs received acclaim from the well-known wedding website The Knot.

Illustration on three major Washington types by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Lawyers, liars and horndogs

Washington has always had lots of lawyers — it's the very nature of this power town; lots of liars — it's the very nature of politics; and, as we have recently discovered, yet again, lots of real horndogs — it's the very nature of power politics.

Facebook Addiction Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false premise of Facebook addiction

In an interview with Axios, Facebook cofounder Sean Parker revealed the founders purposefully created a social network that's addictive: "God only knows what it's doing to our children's brains."

Too many patents approved by the U.S. Patent and Trade Office have been revoked by administrative law judges at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, inventors say. (Associated Press/File)

Stacking the patent deck against inventors

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the patent case Oil States Energy Services, LLC v. Greene's Energy Group, LLC. In many ways, the future of American innovation hangs in the balance.

Revisiting an iconic film, adding too much padding

"Casablanca" is one of the most beloved American classic movies, and is the most shown film on the Turner Classic Movie Channel. However, it also the most powerful piece of propaganda produced by Hollywood during World War II.

A hard look at a Holder holdover

One of the biggest challenges facing the president in draining the Washington Swamp is ferreting out the activists who continue to pursue a progressive agenda in federal agencies.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's efforts to challenge the Iranian regional threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Saudi Arabia awakening

President Trump's unprecedented visit to Riyadh last May did, in effect, provide the underpinnings for the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's (MBS) dramatic plans to bring Saudi Arabia into the 21st century. It is outlined in his Vision 2030 plan to wean the kingdom off oil by greatly diversifying the economy.

Illustration on the stakes for republicans in passing the tax-reform bill by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

On the threshold of a new prosperity

No one gets everything they want — not in university life, business or politics. Folks who won't compromise usually end up with nothing, but for Republicans blocking a Senate tax bill the consequences for the country could be much worse.

Tax Shrink Zapper Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tax cut for everyone

Whenever I'm asked whether the Trump tax cut is for the rich, I say yes. It is a tax cut for the rich. It is a tax cut for the middle class. It is a tax cut for small businesses. It is a tax cut for the Fortune 100. If you pay federal income taxes, you will in almost all cases, be getting more take-home pay come January 1.

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