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Threat assessment

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Web crackdown leaves ordinary Russians on edge

Over the last several years, many laws have been passed which restrict personal freedom. Campaigns against "extremism" have been used to stifle speech the Kremlin doesn't like. There are too many Russians in jail charged with posting something offensive on Facebook or other social media outlets.

Fox News' Tucker Carlson addresses calls to boycott his show that are linked to a Media Matters story about his old radio appearances, March 12, 2019. (Image: Fox News screenshot)

The truth hurts in Brazil

After writing last week of the alleged Brazilian deep state's attempt to bring down a duly-elected president, we received vast amounts of social media engagement, mostly on the positive side, thanking us for highlighting this phenomenon in-country that is being directed against populist candidates across the West and now the world.

The Texas state flag files outside the Huawei Technologies Ltd. business location in Plano, Texas, Thursday, March 7, 2019. The Chinese tech giant is challenging a U.S. law that would limit its American sales of telecom equipment on security grounds as the company steps up efforts to preserve its access to global markets for next-generation communications. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

China learns how to use our courts for its own ends

It looks like China has been tuning in faithfully to the Trump-Russia Show over the last two years, especially the episode about illegal immigration. You know -- the one where the judicial branch of government prevents the commander-in-chief from actually ensuring the national security of the United States.

In this Oct. 28, 2013 photo, President Barack Obama and FBI Director James Comey participate in the installation ceremony for Comey as FBI director, at FBI Headquarters in Washington. President Donald Trump abruptly fired Comey on May 9, 2017, dramatically ousting the nation's top law enforcement official in the midst of an FBI investigation into whether Trump's campaign had ties to Russia's election meddling. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

Obama: 'The buck stops right here at my desk'

After the ugly defeat in the 2014 midterm elections, then-President Barack Obama famously said, "... The buck stops right here at my desk. Whenever, as the head of the party, it doesn't do well, I've got to take responsibility for it."

Policemen stand guard during an antigovernment rally in Tirana, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019. Albanian opposition supporters have surrounded the parliament building and are demanding that the government resign, claiming it's corrupt and has links to organized crime. (AP Photo/Hektor Pustina) **FILE**

Albania smear campaign exposes globalist agenda

Events in Tirana, the capital of Albania, over the last few weeks offer new insights into how this mindset offered up by the liberal American billionaire and his allies plays out in weak countries in Eastern Europe and around the world.

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a state-of-the-nation address in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019. Putin sternly warned the United States against deploying new missiles in Europe, saying that Russia will retaliate by fielding new weapons that will take just as little time to reach their targets. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russia is doing the only thing it can do: threaten

Today in his annual State of the Nation address, Russian President Vladimir Putin did the only thing he could do in response to the United States pulling out of the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) -- threaten, as all schoolyard bullies do when facing an existential crisis. The world knows Russia brought this situation upon itself.

In this picture released on Jan. 12, 2019, by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei takes notes during a meeting in Tehran, Iran.  (Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)

Iran resistance: 40 Years of perceived U.S. appeasement

As the Trump administration tightens the economic screws on Tehran, an interesting event took place at the National Press Club this week in Washington, D.C. The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) held an event highlighting f40 years of Western governments perceived appeasement of the murderous regime in Iran and the predictable consequences of these actions.

Illustration on the fascination with "Russiagate" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russiagate hysteria continues to snare innocent victims

Today, the Democratic Party pulled out the big guns against a leftist sheep who had left the flock - presidential contender Tulsi Gabbard. Yes, you guessed it, it now seems that this veteran of the Iraq War is a Russian agent, at least if you believe the corrupt legacy media.

A Wall Street sign is shown in New York in this Sept. 17, 2008, file photo. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Hybrid financial warfare is the new reality

With the trade war with China and Russiagate in full display every evening in the mainstream Western press, where the anti-Trump narrative is pushed relentlessly, it is easy to miss the continued assault on our financial system by adversarial state actors and their proxies.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Russian President Vladimir Putin look at containers of food as they visit an exhibition during the Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok, Russia, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. (Kirill Kudryavtsev Photo via AP)

U.S. spendthrift ways coming back to haunt us

- The Washington Times

It's comical to hear the screams from Wall Street, the Trump administration and the talking heads freaking out over the recent small rise in short-term interest rates, rightly put in place by the Federal Reserve.

FILE - In this file pool photo taken on Oct. 4, 2017, Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, shakes hands with Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro during their meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia. The crisis in Venezuela may have reached a new boiling point, but the geopolitical fault lines look familiar. Russia, China and Iran have thrown their support behind embattled Maduro, while the U.S., Canada and their allies in Western Europe are backing opposition leader Juan Guaido as interim president. (Yuri Kadobnov/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Why Russia is rushing to prop up disastrous Venezuelan regime

- The Washington Times

The Russian state-run press and Twitter-sphere have been ablaze with indignation over the Trump administration's bold move in Venezuela this week. In case you missed it, the U.S. government and allies across the hemisphere on Wednesday collectively recognized opposition leader Juan Guaido as interim president, in an effort to bring down the disastrous regime of socialist President Nicolas Maduro, a regime which has caused so much misery for the Venezuelan people.

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