- The Washington Times
Thursday, December 9, 2021

NEWS AND OPINION:

It has been a complex, fast moving week for Mark Meadows, the former chief of staff for former President Donald Trump.

He has been in the news after declining to answer questions from the Jan. 6 special committee about the attack on the U.S. Capitol — and his decision to file a lawsuit against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and panelists poised to move forward with criminal contempt proceedings against him.


That evolving situation emerged Tuesday — which also happened to be the publication date for Mr. Meadows’ new book “The Chief’s Chief.” It was published by All Seasons Press, a discerning New York-based publisher focused on the work of conservative writers.

Mr. Meadows — a former Republican congressman from North Carolina who was chairman of the Freedom Caucus during his time in office — has penned a detailed account of his time in the White House. News organizations picked up select portions about Mr. Trump, predictable headlines followed.

Yes, this is a complex situation. But the book has arrived, and here is some information about it.

Mr. Meadows dedicated the book to his family, and also to “the millions of forgotten men and women who President Trump always remembered.”

He also began his story with a detailed prologue, and a straightforward first sentence: “As I write this, President Donald J. Trump has been out of office for nine months.”

Fox News Channel prime-time host Sean Hannity has applauded the book.

“Two things I think define the Trump presidency, and you capture this in the book. He is a guy that made promises and kept them, but also a guy that was tough with China, and Russia, and Iran. And I do believe that the world believed Donald Trump would act if provoked. I don’t think that exists today,” Mr. Hannity told the author, who appeared on the network Tuesday night.

The host also had praise for Mr. Meadows.

“He’s written a terrific new book, I’ve read it cover to cover, I love it,” Mr. Hannity said.

ANOTHER ONE OF THOSE PESKY POLLS

President Biden can’t seem to escape those surveys which reveal his faltering favorability rating. Here comes another one.

“Americans’ most pressing economic concern is inflation, and it’s contributing to a decline in how they view President Biden,” said an analysis of a new National Public Radio/Marist poll released Thursday.

“Biden’s approval is down to 42%, the lowest recorded in the survey since Biden took office. And a slim majority also says he hasn’t fulfilled his campaign promises,” the poll analysis said.

There is a pronounced partisan divide: 81% of Democrats still give the thumbs up to Mr. Biden, compared to 3% of the Republican respondents. Another 51% overall disapprove of how the president is handling the economy.

“Democrats are in a difficult position ahead of next year’s midterms. Historical patterns give the party out of power a distinct advantage in a president’s first midterm elections, and Republicans are favored to take back control of the House next year,” the analysis said.

The survey of 1,048 U.S. adults was conducted Nov. 16-19.

HEROES OF THE BORDER

Let’s spend time with the vigilant but compassionate U.S. Border Patrol. Here’s a small portion of what agents encountered this week, according to news releases published on Monday and Tuesday alone.

U.S. Border Patrol agents assigned to Del Rio Sector in Texas encountered and later processed 3,541 undocumented migrants from 39 different countries. Those covering the neighboring Laredo Sector seized “bundles of suspected narcotics” during an apprehension on the Rio Grande. The bundles had an approximate weight of nearly 900 pounds, and an estimated street value of $704,592.

Agents also saved a 2-year-old child suffering from a serious medical condition south of Laredo, Texas. The child was part of a small family that had become separated from a larger group of undocumented individuals. Border Patrol EMTs provided medical assistance to the child until city medical services transported the small patient to a local hospital.

And one more situation, this from the Louisville Port of Entry in Kentucky. Agents intercepted 89 shipments from Mexico containing controlled substances — including fentanyl and methamphetamine. In the process, agents found two pounds of fentanyl concealed inside a doll.

Agents also intercepted 42 shipments of counterfeit designer handbags, watches and jewelry arriving from Hong Kong, called at $3.3 million — along with $4.45 million in counterfeit currency. Find the agency itself at CBP.gov.

WEEKEND REAL ESTATE

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POLL DU JOUR

• 80% of U.S. adults think the U.S. will become more racially and ethnically diverse in the next 10 years; 83% of Republicans, 80% of independents and 85% of Democrats agree.

• 53% overall think a “strong, charismatic leader” will gain power and maintain control; 68% of Republicans, 36% of independents and 58% of Democrats agree.

• 39% overall think the American people will reject political hostility and divisiveness; 39% of Republicans, 27% of independents and 49% of Democrats agree.

• 31% overall think “special interests” will have less power and ordinary people “greater influence”; 32% of Republicans, 22% of independents and 41% of Democrats agree.

• 19% overall think Democratic states and Republican states will split off into two separate countries; 26% of Republicans, 19% of independents and 17% of Democrats agree.

SOURCE: A Public Agenda/USA Today poll of 2,345 U.S. adults conducted Sept. 20-28 and released Thursday.

• Follow Jennifer Harper on Twitter @harperbulletin.

• Jennifer Harper can be reached at jharper@washingtontimes.com.


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