- The Washington Times
Sunday, October 20, 2019

Things have greatly improved for Sen. Bernard Sanders, who has recovered from a heart attack on the campaign trail and returned to public life — appearing Saturday at a major rally in New York City where he earned the ready endorsement of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The Vermont independent and New York Democrat then celebrated progressive values and socialism before an enthusiastic crowd of 25,000.

But wait. Let’s suppose Mr. Sanders and Ms. Ocasio-Cortez joined forces and she became his running mate in the 2020 presidential race. Can you imagine the glowing press, the giddy commentary the endless photo-ops of the dream team — the brave septuagenarian and the 30-something who could in theory shake up the political world?


Uh, no.

At 30, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez is not old enough to take the vice presidential office. Like the presidential candidate, a vice presidential hopeful must be at least 35, as stipulated by the Constitution.

But wait again. There’s also filmmaker Michael Moore waiting in the wings. He also endorsed Mr. Sanders, and, at 65, is old enough to be a veep.

So you never know. Maybe we’ll see SANDERS/MOORE 2020 on a bumper sticker somewhere, After all, one of the bestselling bumper stickers at the moment is one which reads “ANY FUNCTIONING ADULT 2020.”

PELOSI’S UNFAVORABILITY RATINGS

Some analysts have pointed out that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s favorability ratings are rising during the impeachment inquiry, inching up from say, 37% to 39%. Amazing. “Favorability increases” — it makes for a nice headline. What the clever analysts don’t say is that quite often, the majority or near majority of respondents in many of these polls actually disapprove of the job Mrs. Pelosi is doing. Citing popularity as opposed to unpopularity is a convenient and canny device.

And some numbers: A Politico/Morning Consult voter poll found Mrs. Pelosi with a 51% unfavorability rating.

That includes 83% of Republicans, 55% of independents and 21% of Democrats. Among those who voted for Mr. Trump the number is 87%; among those who voted for former President Barack Obama, it’s 31%. The poll of 1,993 registered U.S. voters was conducted Oct. 11-13.

Meanwhile, a Georgetown University poll of 1,011 voters conducted Oct. 6-10 finds Mrs. Pelosi with a 52% unfavorability rating; that includes 43% who “strongly” disapprove. Intriguing demographic breakdowns were not included in this survey.

Finally, a Fox News poll found the House speaker with a 48% unfavorable rating; 80% of Republicans, 58% of independents and 19% of Democrats agreed. So did 75% of conservatives, 44% of moderates — and even 20% of liberals.

THE MARVEL OF TRUMP ENERGY

If you marvel of President Trump’s sustained level of energy, you’re not alone. Those close to Mr. Trump also shake their heads in wonder.

“He has been in office for three years. He has sustained an energy and a momentum that we have never seen,” Republican National Committee chairwoman Ronna McDaniel tells Fox News.

“His supporters are with him 100%. Wages are up. Unemployment is at a record low. You’ve got jobs coming back. People know that he went out and promised these things to the American people. Now he is delivering, their lives are better and they are going to do everything they can to reelect him. His energy is so strong and it just keeps growing. It’s amazing,” Mrs. McDaniel said.

VOTERS: YEAH, THEY’RE AFTER TRUMP

A straightforward poll reveals a little something Republicans have been mulling for quite some time:

“Just over half of voters still believe in the likelihood of an illegal high-level effort to stop the Trump presidency,” says a new Rasmussen Reports national survey.

It found that 51% of likely U.S. voters think it’s likely senior law enforcement officials broke the law in an effort to prevent President Trump from winning the presidency. That includes 34% who say it’s “very likely.”

About a third say the prospects are unlikely. The survey of 1,000 likely voters was conducted Oct. 9-10.

A PRODUCTIVE PARTNERSHIP

The National Park Service and the Netherlands Embassy are combining forces to restore the 127-foot high Netherlands Carillon, located near Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

“The carillon is a symbol of Dutch gratitude to the American people for helping liberate the Netherlands during World War II,” the parks folks advise.

Over time, each of the 50 bronze bells — which weigh a combined 30 tons — will be removed, cleaned, repaired and reinstalled. Work on the carillon — which was dedicated in 1960 — begins Monday. On hand for the big occasion: Andre Haspels, Dutch ambassador to the U.S., and George Washington Memorial Parkway Superintendent Charles Cuvelier.

MUST-SEE TRUMP TV

Programming of note: Fox News prime-time kingpin Sean Hannity will present an interview with President Trump to air at 9 p.m. EDT Monday.

This exchange will originate from the White House. Mr. Trump is expected to discuss the latest complexities on the impeachment inquiry, the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates and the cease-fire in Syria, along with other news of the day.

POLL DU JOUR

81% of Americans overall are concerned about the partisan division between Republicans and Democrats increasing; 83% of Republicans and 88% of Democrats agree.

78% overall say the division between the parties is increasing; 85% of Republicans and 78% of Democrats agree.

73% overall say Republicans and Democrats can’t agree on “basic facts”; 77% of Republicans and 72% of Democrats agree.

55% overall say there is a “great deal” of difference between what each party stands for; 74% of Republicans and 59% of Democrats agree.

37% overall say there is a “fair amount” of difference; 24% of Republicans and 38% of Democrats agree.

7% overall say there is “hardy any” difference; 2% of Republicans and 3% of Democrats agree.

Source: A Pew Research Center poll of 9,895 U.S. adults conducted Sept. 3-15 and released OCT. 10. THE PARTY BREAKDOWNS DID NOT INCLUDE THOSE WHO ONLY “LEAN” TOWARD ONE PARTY AND THE POLL DID NOT BREAK OUT INDEPENDENTS.

• Helpful information to jharper@washingtontimes.com


Copyright © 2019 The Washington Times, LLC.