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Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can't keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won't fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a family photo during the ASEAN-U.S. 40th Anniversary commemorative Summit in Manila, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. (Manan Vatsyayana/Pool Photo via AP)

Coming home from an Asian tutorial

- The Washington Times

No one should be rude. Bad manners are not nice. Doesn't everybody's mama teach him that? Donald Trump certainly knows how to overdo it, but sometimes a president must be strategically rude to make a necessary point.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks as Facebook's General Counsel Colin Stretch, Twitter's Acting General Counsel Sean Edgett, and Google's Law Enforcement and Information Security Director Richard Salgado, testify during a Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, on more signs from tech companies of Russian election activity. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Never letting a massacre go to waste

- The Washington Times

Shooting up a church, even in a small town where a lot of people voted for Donald Trump, is a wicked thing to do. Everybody -- well, nearly everybody -- thinks so. But some people are determined not to let a convenient massacre go to waste.

Special counsel Robert Mueller (Associated Press) **FILE**

A lot of noisy ado about nothing much yet

- The Washington Times

The mountain labored, and brought forth a mouse. It's a skinny little thing, not likely to frighten the most delicate milady. Robert Mueller is surely hard at work in his laboratory trying to breed a larger and more impressive creature.

Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Hillary's very own Russian collusion connection

- The Washington Times

The Clinton can is as full of worms as her harshest critics ever imagined it was, and now the worms are turning. Washington is agog, liberal and conservative alike, as the details of the spreading story of confusion, chicanery and crime in Hillary's campaign for president emerge from the dark and fetid places so abundant in the capital.

Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, head of Austrian People's Party, smiles in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, after the closing of the polling stations for the Austrian national elections. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader) ** FILE **

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you've lost your mojo.

Cyrus Vance, Jr.

A Weinstein verdict to suit the Red Queen

- The Washington Times

Sometimes the lynch mob gets the guilty party, but that's not the way to run a railroad. We have laws, after all, even if some of them are subject to change. But due process is permanent.

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964     Associated Press photo

Having fun with diagnosing the Donald

- The Washington Times

Witch doctors are not necessarily more skilled than psychiatrists and psychologists, but they're sometimes harder on the pocketbook. A group of "mental-health professionals" have offered to resolve the Donald Trump "problem" for free. In the learned and precise professional language of their trade, they think he's "nuts."

President Donald Trump listens to Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo during a meeting with first responders at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, in Las Vegas. Associated Press photo

With neither bombast nor bravado, a presidential president

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump promised in his barnstorming campaign for president, with bombast and bravado, that once elected he would tone everything down and be "presidential." He was elected and we learned that, candidate or president, the Donald doesn't do presidential.

Sen. Marco Rubio, Florida Republican. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The crass politics of windy compassion

- The Washington Times

Those ill winds blowing out of the Caribbean are blowing somebody good, or at least there's somebody who thinks they're good. There's always profit in somebody else's misery.

Members of the Oakland Raiders take a knee while others stand during the national anthem. (Associated Press)

Once upon a knee at the old ball game

- The Washington Times

There's a lunatic in Asia credibly threatening the world with a hydrogen bomb. Congress can't pull itself together to do anything. But enough of that. We're all obsessed now with what a few tubby athletes think about the flag, the national anthem and the country others have shed blood and lives to defend and protect.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We've heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The furtive romance at the White House

- The Washington Times

Summer's almost gone, but romance is still in the air over Pennsylvania Avenue. Nancy Pelosi's dancing the night away with the devil at the White House, and Chuck Schumer, the chaperone, is making himself right at home on Donald Trump's sofa. That's Mitch McConnell sitting off to the side by himself, trying to figure out whether to look chagrined or cheery. Or at least not as superfluous as he feels.

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