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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a Chicago Town Hall event at Chicago's Auditorium Theatre at Roosevelt University, Friday, June 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky) ** FILE **

Elizabeth Warren adrift in the world of politics

- The Washington Times

There's all kind of reasons why Elizabeth Warren probably won't be president, and Claire McCaskill, her former colleague in the U.S. Senate, thinks she knows the reason why. Mrs. Warren, says Mrs. McCaskill, struggles with being "in command of policy" and still being "relatable."

A man polishes the sign for The New York Times at the company's headquarters, July 18, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ** FILE **

Newspapers need to restore trust with public, stop whining

- The Washington Times

Newspapers are feeling under the gun. People don't want to pay for what they're selling. The sweet aroma of paper and ink, the bang and clatter of hundreds of typewriters that evaporated in the clouds of tobacco smoke that once made newsrooms dark and mysterious cave-like places, the thunder of rows of printing presses, must give way to timid tapping on plastic keyboards. The newspaper game is up.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during the I Will Vote Fundraising Gala Thursday, June 6, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Democratic primary debates will be a dull affair

- The Washington Times

The Democrats are finally tuning up for the party's first presidential primary debates next week, and so far the only topics they can be expected to "debate" is who hates Donald Trump the most and who loves socialism the most. Nothing much to debate there.

President Donald Trump speaks on the South Lawn at the White House, Monday, June 10, 2019, in Washington as he honors Team Penske for the 2019 Indianapolis 500 win. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Why the Trump deal with Mexico is good

- The Washington Times

It's not easy being a Democrat, and it's even more difficult to be a leader in the party, a speaker of the House or the leader of the minority in the Senate. It's true that hard times can make a monkey eat red pepper, as the ancient wisdom goes, but Democratic hard times are encouraging a rare run on red pepper.

Queen Elizabeth II

Pomp, fakery, shock, rage, and crisis averted

- The Washington Times

Another crisis lies behind us. The New York Times had reported that Donald Trump was, all by himself, plotting to destroy the Special Relationship with Britain, and The Washington Post reported unidentified troop movements near Yorktown, believed to be remnants of the British army surrendered by Gen. Cornwallis, marching on the capital to avenge Mr. Trump's various insults in London.

William Shakespeare

Who will answer when a nation calls for greatness

- The Washington Times

Nations are raised to greatness through the virtues of great men, as Edmund Burke observed, and Britain could once call on the likes of Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher when the hour of greatest peril arrived.

Special counsel Robert Mueller speaks at the Department of Justice Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Washington, about the Russia investigation. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Robert Mueller just wants to feel the love again

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller just wants to feel the love again. His press clippings have faded and life hasn't been the same for the man choking on rectitude and righteousness, not since he turned in his account of the vain pursuit of Donald Trump and the Russians. After more than two years trying to find the president in bed with Vladimir Putin, he didn't even find the bed.

In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Julian Assange, another colluder with Russia, is called to account

- The Washington Times

Julian Assange continues to be a pain in sensitive places, from the neck to the unmentionable nether regions. Mr. Assange is clearly in serious legal trouble. The charges against him, contained in a 17-count indictment that says he "received and published" classified intelligence, are "jail-y," and probably for a long time.

Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden during a campaign rally at Eakins Oval in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Joe Biden uses empty rhetoric in 2020 presidential campaign

- The Washington Times

Pity good ol' Joe Biden. He's eager at last to master the hounds, to impose order in the kennel. He wants to encourage the amiable golden retrievers, collies and cocker spaniels in his care, and he has to throw a little raw meat to the rabid pit bulls. How can he do that and escape with his life, too?

This photo made available by the U.S. National Archives shows the first page of the United States Constitution. (National Archives via AP)

'Christchurch Call' an affront to freedom of speech

- The Washington Times

The First Amendment to the Constitution, the most important 44 words in that priceless and precious promise of liberty and freedom, does not guarantee civil, wise or even responsible speech. It guarantees free speech, however goofy, dumb or even irresponsible.

British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in London, to attend Prime Minister's Questions at the Houses of Parliament, Wednesday, May 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Brexit clock running out

- The Washington Times

It's foolish to compare the politics of Britain to the politics in America, kissin' cousins though we may be. The music is similar, but not the words.

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