- The Washington Times
Wednesday, March 24, 2021

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

The last two weeks have exposed the blue check-mark pseudo-pundits and progressive politicians for what they are — racists.

The left-wing political class, and their allies in the mainstream media, immediately pounced on the mass shootings in both Atlanta and Colorado to politicize White supremacy. 


There was no time to mourn the dead, send prayers to the grieving families, or even to understand the true motivations of the shooters, before the woke-class jumped on Twitter to blame an entire group of people — White males specifically — for all of the evils in our society. 

“Extremely tired of people’s lives depending on whether a white man with an AR-15 is having a good day or not,” Deadspin Editor Julie DiCaro tweeted, to which USA Today Race and Inclusion Editor Hemai Jhaveri replied: “It’s always an angry white man, always.”

Vice President Kamala Harris’ niece, Meena Harris weighed in, adding “Violent white men are the greatest terrorist threat to our country,” only to delete the Tweet after it was found the Colorado shooter was in fact a left-leaning Muslim named Ahmad Al Aliwi Alissa.

But that didn’t stop Rep. Ilhan Omar from stoking the ideological fires by tweeting: “So ‘he is Muslim’ is trending, did I miss ‘he’s Christian’ trending for last week’s Atlanta mass murderer?”

No, that in fact was blamed on the White-male shooter’s supposed Asian hate, which again, wasn’t true. He had a sex addiction and law-enforcement officers have found no motivation of a hate-crime. 

Yet, facts don’t matter to the progressive woke class. Their entire ideology is grounded in the premise that White-privilege — especially White, male privilege — is the root cause of inequity and inequality in our country. Every White person is inherently racist, even if they don’t know it, and must repented for it. 

Critical race theory and training has emerged as an $8 billion a year industry as U.S. governments, schools and corporations look to teach White people just how despicable they are.  

There are two problems with this. The first is that it’s explicitly un-American — people should be judged not on their race, socioeconomic background, gender or sexuality, but by their deeds. This toxic ideology completely erases individual responsibility and character.

The second problem is, it’s factually wrong. Violent crimes are committed every day in America — and White people don’t have sole ownership on all of these violent acts. 

The Bureau of Justice Statistics’ 2019 crime victimization statistics report shows people are more likely to commit violent crimes against someone of their own skin color than they are against someone of a different race.

Perpetrators were White in 62% of violent acts committed against White victims, Black in 70% of incidents committed against Black victims and Hispanic in 45% of incidents committed against Hispanic victims, according to the BJS report.

There is an exception when it comes to Asians. The BJS report finds Blacks commit a disproportionate number of hate crimes against Asians. About 28% of violent offenders against Asian victims are Black compared to only 24% of Asians. Blacks make up only 13% of the population. 

Yet, when you read articles describing violent crimes and the comments associated with them among our woke pundit class, you would think every single one was committed by a White male. This simply isn’t the case.

We’re unfortunately living in a time where feelings trump facts. Where the White-man bad narrative triumphs over individual responsibility. Where one race is blamed for the ills of a society, and everybody else is excused as oppressed, powerless victims.

We must end this poisonous ideology — for it divides us as a nation and limits our individual potential. It also rationalizes wrongs committed by non-Whites.

As Martin Luther King Jr. once said, we must not judge people by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. This principle needs to be applied universally. 

• Kelly Sadler is commentary editor at The Washington Times.


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