- The Washington Times
Thursday, February 7, 2019

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, New York Democrat, released Thursday the much-anticipated Green New Deal resolution, outlining a sweeping overhaul of the economy and energy sector laden with ambitious social-justice goals.

She and Sen. Ed Markey, Massachusetts Democrat, introduced non-binding resolutions in the House and Senate calling for a “10-year national mobilization” on 14 projects aimed at achieving “zero-net greenhouse-gas emissions through a fair and just transition for all communities and workers.”


At the same time, the resolution stopped short of demanding the elimination of fossil fuels, as some proponents of a Green New Deal had previously suggested, calling instead for eliminating greenhouse-gas emissions in infrastructure “as much as technologically feasible.”

The resolution, which was posted on NPR, came hours before a Thursday afternoon press conference featuring Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and Mr. Markey.

“The Green New Deal fully tackles the existential threat posed by climate change by presenting a comprehensive, 10-year plan that is as big as the problem it hopes to solve while creating a new era of shared prosperity,” according to a summary of the resolution, according to Reuters.

Meanwhile, the House Republican Conference blasted the resolution as a “trojan horse for socialism,” calling it the “largest federal spending program and government expansion this country has yet to see.”

“Let’s be clear, the Green New Deal is a trojan horse for socialism,” said the House GOP statement. “This resolution makes promises of new jobs, free college, and prosperity while calling for policies that we know will bankrupt our economy, destroy jobs, impede innovation in the free-market, and destabilize our great nation.”

The broad outline called for meeting 100 percent of U.S. power demand through clean and renewable energy, as well as upgrading “all existing buildings in the United States” to achieve maximum “energy efficiency, water efficiency, safety, affordability, comfort, and durability.”

There was a call for more public transportation, electric vehicles, and high-speed rail, and giving the public “appropriate ownership stakes and returns on investment.”

Labor unions would receive a large slice of the pie: the resolutions would ensure “high-quality union jobs that pay prevailing wages,” strengthen union collective-bargaining rights, and guarantee “a job with a family-sustaining wage, adequate family and medical leave, paid vacations, and retirement security to all people of the United States.”

Almost as an afterthought, the resolution called for providing “all people of the United States” with “high-quality health care,” as well as affordable housing, economic security, and access to clean air, water, “healthy and affordable food, and nature.”

Reaction ranged from enthusiastic support to horrified opposition. Conservative radio host Mark Levin called the plan to “effectively destroy capitalism,” while the Sierra Club lauded the resolutions as a “bold plan to tackle the climate crisis and inequality — two of the defining crises of our time — at the speed and scale that science and justice demand.”

Others compared the sprawling resolution to a Soviet-style five-year plan, with cost estimates as high as $7 trillion.

 

 


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