- The Washington Times
Tuesday, May 16, 2017

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Well, that didn’t last long, did it? Social media had been afire with news of the newest Miss USA, black Washington, D.C., representative Kara McCullough, and her conservative viewpoints — most particularly, the one that went like this: Health care is not a right, but rather a privilege.

Fast-forward a few short hours and her mantra now goes: Oops. My bad. I meant health care is indeed a right.


That’s head-spinningly fast.

“I would like to just take this moment to truly clarify because I am a woman, I’m going to own what I said. I am privileged to have health care,” McCullough said Tuesday on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” “And I do believe that it should be a right, and I hope and pray moving forward that health care is a right for all worldwide.”

That’s not the song she had been singing, though.

When asked during the question-answer portion of the beauty competition whether she thought health care was a right or privilege for Americans, McCullough said this: “I’m definitely going to say it’s a privilege. As a government employee, I’m granted health care. And I see firsthand that for one, to have health care, you need to have jobs, so therefore we need to continue to cultivate this environment so that we’re given the opportunities to have health care as well as jobs for all Americans worldwide.”

Sigh. That was a short-lived moment for the right, wasn’t it?

McCullough, not only black, not only from one of the most liberal cities in the nation, nay, world, but also a conservative who parted ways with the key ingredient in Obamacare passage — the message that health insurance was a right, not individual responsibility?

Brains, beauty and conservative values and principles, all while defying the stereotypes of the Democratic voter. It seemed too good to be true.

Guess it was.


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