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FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2016, file photo, people stand on the steps of the Supreme Court at sunset in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, file) **FILE**

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In this photo taken April 4, 2017, the Supreme Court Building is seen in Washington. The Supreme Court struck down two congressional districts in North Carolina Monday, May 22, 2017, because race played too large a role in their creation, a decision voting rights advocates said would boost challenges in other states. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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FILE - In this April 7, 2017 file photo, visitors arrive at the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court on Monday, May 15, 2017, rejected an appeal to reinstate North Carolina's voter identification law that a lower court said targeted African-Americans "with almost surgical precision." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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FILE - In this April 7, 2017 file photo, visitors arrive at the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court on Monday, May 15, 2017, rejected an appeal to reinstate North Carolina's voter identification law that a lower court said targeted African-Americans "with almost surgical precision." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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FILE - In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 4, 2017, the Supreme Court Building is seen in Washington. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's earlier dissent as an appeals court judge in a case involving a New Mexico seventh-grader who was handcuffed and arrested after his teacher said the student had disrupted gym class with fake burps, means he probably won't have any role in considering it, should it come before the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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FILE In this April 7, 2017 file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court seemed closely divided Monday, April 24, 2017, about whether an Alabama death row inmate should get a new sentencing hearing because he did not have a mental health expert on his side when he was tried and sentenced to death more than 30 years ago. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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In this photo provided by the Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S., Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr., and fellow justices watch as Neil Gorsuch signs the Constitutional Oath after Roberts administered the Constitutional Oath in a private ceremony, Monday, April 10, 2017, in the Justices' Conference Room at the Supreme Court in Washington. How do you keep a new Supreme Court justice’s head from getting too big? Start by making him take notes and answer the door at the justices’ private meetings. Then, remind him he speaks last at those discussions. Finally, assign him the job of listening to gripes about the food at the court’s cafeteria. (Franz Jantzen/Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. via AP)

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In this photo provided by the Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S., Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr., and fellow justices watch as Neil Gorsuch signs the Constitutional Oath in the Justices' after Roberts administered the Constitutional Oath in a private ceremony, Monday, April 10, 2017, in the Justices' Conference Room at the Supreme Court in Washington. (Franz Jantzen/Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. via AP)

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In this photo provided by the Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., administers the Constitutional Oath to the Neil Gorsuch in a private ceremony attended by the Justices of the Supreme Court and members of the Gorsuch family, including wife Louise Gorsuch, Monday, April 10, 2017, in the Justices' Conference Room at the Supreme Court in Washington. Surrounded by family and his soon-to-be Supreme Court colleagues, Gorsuch took the first of two oaths as he prepared to take his seat on the court. (Franz Jantzen/Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. via AP)

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FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2017 file photo, then-Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington. With a divisive confirmation process behind him, Gorsuch is about to take his place as the nation's newest Supreme Court justice. The 49-year-old appeals court judge from Colorado is to be sworn in April 10, after a bruising fight that saw Republicans change the rules for approving Supreme Court picks over the fierce objection of Democrats. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

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Pro-life activists converge in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, during the annual March for Life. Thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators gathered in Washington for an annual march to protest the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 decision that declared a constitutional right to abortion. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch speaks during his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Gorsuch’s confirmation as the 113th Supreme Court justice is expected on April 7. It won’t be long before he starts revealing what he really thinks about a range of hot topics he repeatedly sidestepped during his confirmation hearing.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of N.Y., walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, as Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to change Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, after speaking on the floor about changes to the Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of N.Y., walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, as Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to change Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, as he is expected to change Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Venezuela's Vice-President Tareck El Aissami, left, and Supreme Court President Maikel Moreno during a meeting with Ambassadors from different countries and Diplomatics at the Supreme Court in Caracas, Venezuela, Saturday, April 1, 2017. Venezuela's president and Supreme Court backed down Saturday from an audacious move to strip congress of its legislative powers that had sparked widespread charges that the South American country was no longer a democracy. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

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Venezuelan Bolivarian National guards officers are confronted by university students during a protest outside of the Supreme Court in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, March 31, 2017. Venezuelans have been thrust into a new round of political turbulence after the government-stacked Supreme Court gutted congress of its last vestiges of power, drawing widespread condemnation from foreign governments and sparking protests in the capital. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

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FILE - This Feb. 14, 2017, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court has sided with a Texas death row inmate Bobby James Moore who claims he should not be executed because he is intellectually disabled. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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Pro-life activists converge in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, during the annual March for Life. Thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators gathered in Washington for an annual march to protest the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 decision that declared a constitutional right to abortion. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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