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FILE -This undated file photo provided by the Sacramento County Sheriff's office shows Carl Ferrer CEO of adult classified ad portal Backpage. Law enforcement experts and sex worker advocates say shutting down what prosecutors call an online brothel could have unintended negative consequences. California is prosecuting Backpage.com's two founders and its chief executive and they are due in court Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. (Sacramento County Sheriff's Office via AP,File)

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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Sacramento County Sheriff's office shows Michael Lacey one of the former owners of Backpage a major international website advertising escort services. Law enforcement experts and sex worker advocates say shutting down what prosecutors call an online brothel could have unintended negative consequences. California is prosecuting Backpage.com's two founders and its chief executive and they are due in court Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. (Sacramento County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)

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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Sacramento County Sheriff's office shows James Larkin one of the former owners of Backpage a major international website advertising escort services. Law enforcement experts and sex worker advocates say shutting down what prosecutors call an online brothel could have unintended negative consequences. California is prosecuting Backpage.com's two founders and its chief executive and they are due in court Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. (Sacramento County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)

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FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2017 file photo from left, Backpage.com CEO Carl Ferrer, former owner James Larkin, COO Andrew Padilla, and former owner Michael Lacey, are sworn-in on Capitol Hill in Washington, prior to testifying before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee hearing into Backpage.com's alleged facilitation of online sex trafficking. Ferrer, Lacy and Larkin appeared in Sacramento Superior Court Tuesday, Jan. 24 to face renewed charges that include pimping, conspiracy and money laundering. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

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Backpage.com CEO Carl Ferrer leaves the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, after invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

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Screen capture of Backpage.com.

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In this Oct. 21, 2014 file photo, people opposed to child sex trafficking rally outside of the Washington state Supreme Court in Olympia, Wash. The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, in favor of three young girls who sued Backpage.com, claiming they were sold as prostitutes on the site. Thursday's ruling says the Communications Decency Act does not protect Backpage from state lawsuits because there's enough evidence to show that it didn't just host the ads, but helped develop the content. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte/ File)

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