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U.S.-Russia Crosstalk

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Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko gestures while answering to a journalist's question ahead of the presidential elections on April 21, at the Olympic stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, Sunday, April 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

CROSSTALK: Ukraine elections: Why should Americans care?

Back in 2002, when President George W. Bush was mulling his attack on Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell reportedly cautioned him with what came to be known as the Pottery Barn Rule: "You break it, you own it."

In this Jan. 30, 2019, photo, Secretary of State Michael Pompeo at the State Department in Washington. The Trump administration is expected to announce as soon as Friday that it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War and whose demise some analysts worry could fuel a new arms race. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

CROSSTALK: Is democracy the answer to the world's problems?

According to President Trump's enemies, the list of his high crimes and misdemeanors, as well as his domestic and foreign policy failures, is so overwhelming that it would be almost impossible to add something substantial to it.

Deputy Director of the Department for Non-Proliferation and Arms Control of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Oleg Rozhkov attends a panel discussion after a Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) conference in Beijing, China, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) conference in Beijing of the UN Security Council consists of five permanent members (P5) China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. (Thomas Peter/Pool Photo via AP)

CROSSTALK: Are we sleepwalking into nuclear disaster?

If anyone needed proof that former Sen. Sam Nunn, Georgia Democrat, and former Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz were right when they recently wrote in Politico that the U.S. and Russia are sleepwalking toward nuclear disaster, it came last week during Vladimir Putin's annual address to the Russian parliament.

The Syrian Chimera (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

Untying the U.S. Syria pullout from Russian expansion

I have written before that I don't believe Russia is the No. 1 threat to American security. On the contrary, a rising China is much more bent on confronting America militarily in the South China Sea or elsewhere, and Iran is bent on developing nuclear weapons to use irresponsibly.

Trump Influence of Putin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump foreign policy gets mixed results

Of all Donald Trump's bucking of the bipartisan consensus in 2016, none struck terror into swamp spines more than his pledge to dump the globalists' endless wars and pointless commitments in favor of putting America first.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a Security Council meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

CROSSTALK: Peace with Russia: Keep talking

Peace comes only when the balance of power is found or one side in a conflict defeats the other. It is obvious that neither Russia nor the West is going to defeat the other, so a solution in Ukraine and other conflicts must be found.

In this Nov. 9, 2017, photo, U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping participate in a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. Mr. Xi had an "extremely positive" phone conversation with Mr. Trump about trade and other issues, the foreign ministry said Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. The two leaders agreed to "strengthen economic exchanges," said a ministry spokesman, Lu Kang. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

CROSSTALK: Trump hitting reset buttons on Russia, China

There are some truths that I strive to preach, for lack of a better word, in today's information-culture wars propagated in our corrupt mainstream media. Here are a few: Nationalism is not racism, adherence to principles is not hate, masculinity is not toxic and there are only two sexes.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before departing for France on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

CROSSTALK: US-Russia-China Big Three - or WW III?

An expected meeting this weekend between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a Paris commemoration of the end of World War I has been thrown into doubt, though a sideline encounter may still take place. A more substantive discussion between the men who control the world's biggest nuclear arsenals is expected at the G20 Buenos Aires summit later this month, when Mr. Trump will also meet with China's President Xi Jinping.

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton, left, and Russian Security Council chairman Nikolai Patrushev talk prior their official talks in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Bolton met with Patrushev to discuss a broad range of issues including arms control agreements, Syria, Iran, North Korea and the fight against terrorism.(Press Service of the Russian Security Council via AP)

CROSSTALK: John Bolton to press US-Russia nuclear treaty

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton is visiting Moscow this week to meet with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Russian National Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev. It is reported that a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin could also be in the works.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov smiles as he speaks to Madagascar's Foreign Minister Eloi Maxime Alphonse Dovo during their meeting in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Lavrov will meet with U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton for high-tension talks in Moscow, after President Donald Trump announced his intention to withdraw from a landmark nuclear weapons treaty. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

CROSSTALK: Bolton in Moscow: But on whose agenda?

National Security Adviser John Bolton is scheduled to meet with his Russian counterpart, Nikolai Patrushev, and other senior officials, including Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Moscow.

Syria's United Nations Ambassador Bashar Jaafari, center, listens as President Donald Trump address the United Nations General Assembly, Tuesday Sept. 25, 2018 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

CROSSTALK: U.S., Russia play 'chicken' in Syria

During the past six months, the U.S. and Russia came close at least three times to a direct military clash in Syria with unpredictable consequences, including possible use of nuclear weapons. Each time unthinkable disaster was avoided at the last minute, but no one knows if we will be lucky again the next time.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., left, and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, pose questions to witnesses as the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations holds a hearing on relations between the U.S. and Russia, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

CROSSTALK: Sanctions are coming. What next?

Upcoming discussion of crushing new anti-Russia legislation that Sen. Lindsey Graham calls "the sanctions bill from hell" will show if there are any sober-minded members of Congress still left on Capitol Hill.

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, shake hand at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

CROSSTALK: Trump-Putin Helsinki summit: What's next?

Ever since the Helsinki summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, the mainstream-corporate media, well-known Democrats and many highly placed Republicans have been in full-tilt lather against Mr. Trump.

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