U.S.-Russia Crosstalk - Washington Times

U.S.-Russia Crosstalk

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Russians stand during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 74 years since the victory in WWII in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, May 9, 2019. Putin told the annual military Victory Day parade in Red Square that the country will continue to strengthen its armed forces. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

The duality of fever

One side effect of the SARS Coronavirus-2 appears to be a diminished appetite among Americans for war with Russia. Given the overreaction by my fellow Americans, thanks to whom I may have to go back to Soviet toilet paper (newspaper) -- and am once again getting into any line I see -- one would hate to see how they'd react in a real crisis

President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, Friday, June 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Needed: U.S.-Russia collusion 2.0 in 2020

It would take desperation to find something heartening in the Russian portion of National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien's comments last week at the Meridian International Center, which were replete with the typical projections and inversions between us and them. But amid Washington's unhinged nonseriousness (President Trump selling Alaska to Russia as a bargaining chip, Rep. Adam Schiff?), a desperate grab for sanity is better than none at all.

New U.S. Ambassador to Russia John Sullivan, center, poses after presenting his diplomatic credentials with Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov during a ceremony to receive credentials from newly appointed foreign ambassadors to Russia in Kremlin, in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (Aleksey Nikolskyi, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Time to start full scale U.S.-Russia dialogue

Now that President Trump has been acquitted after the three-year-long impeachment ordeal, some of us expect him to start this dialogue that he pledged to initiate during the past electoral campaign and kept repeating many times over without following up.

Iranian boots on the ground (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

A little 2020 foresight, please

Not to add to apocalyptic associations with the year 2020, but we now find ourselves officially in the Year of the Rat, according to the Chinese calendar -- characterized by chaos. Thanks only to my obscure interest in the Balkans, sparked in 1999 by the shock that a war could be started by the world's superhero nation and my family's refuge from inhumanity, I learned the Serbian word for war: rat.

Forestry researcher Jhon Farfan carries saplings to replant a field damaged by illegal gold miners in Madre de Dios, Peru, on March 29, 2019. The rainforest is under increasing threat from illicit logging, mining and ranching. Farfan's job involves inspecting lands where the forest has already been lost to illegal mining spurred by the spike in gold prices following the 2008 global financial crash. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Can Russia be key in fighting climate change?

While U.S.-Russian relations keep sinking in a seemingly bottomless ditch, optimists aren't ready to give up and wonder whether there is anything to reverse or at least to stop this process before Armageddon.

Russian Reaction to Nato Expansion Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to build trust between U.S. and Russia

At a time of one of the greatest political upheavals in American history that could spill over into foreign affairs, especially U.S.-Russian relations with unpredictable and devastating results, I thought Christmas might offer a chance for all of us to take a pause and search for an exit from the megacrisis.

Worldly Ambitions of Vladimir Putin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Can Russia trust the wily, wily West?

On a recent episode of "Life, Liberty and Levin," Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson told host Mark Levin, "The problem at the moment is partly that we are on a kind of permanent war footing with respect to Moscow ... It's also partly that President Putin simply cannot bring himself to trust the United States."

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., flanked by Rep. Russ Fulcher, R-Idaho, left, and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, right, the ranking member of the Committee on Oversight Reform, and other conservative House Republicans, complain to reporters about how House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is conducting the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. House committees are trying to determine if Trump violated his oath of office by asking a foreign country, Ukraine, to investigate his political opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his son Hunter Biden. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Is Ukraine vital to U.S. security?

The ongoing impeachment inquiry of President Trump can certainly compete with Hollywood's most successful drama or comedy shows. However, when we deal with national security issues one expects the actors, in this case members of Congress and witnesses, to tell the truth. In this case, some do, but some regrettably do not.

Marine One, with President Donald Trump aboard, lifts off from the the South Lawn of the White House, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Ukraine isn't vital to U.S. security

We all heard former Ukraine Ambassador William B. Taylor at the impeachment hearings say -- as so many do daily -- that "Ukraine is on the front line in the conflict with a newly aggressive Russia."

Bizarro Biden Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Washington turmoil affects U.S.-Russia relations

As the political temperature in Washington rapidly rises to unprecedented boiling levels, when accusations of attempted coup and state treason are exchanged between the president and the speaker of the House, what's the danger of spillover into the foreign policy arena?

President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, Friday, June 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Why the G-7 is irrelevant

The world has changed since the establishment of the G-7. No longer are these economies the most important in the world. Italy, Canada, even Germany and France, have drifted into socialist zombie land, unable to grow or realize their potential.

In this Aug. 25, 2019, photo, U.S President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands following a news conference at the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, to announce that the U.S. and Japan have agreed in principle on a new trade agreement. On Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, officials in Japan appear wary over the prospects for a trade deal with the U.S. after President Donald Trump said he was prepared to sign a pact soon. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Forget G-7, what we need is G-5

At the August Group of Seven summit in France, President Trump suggested inviting Russian President Vladimir Putin to the next such summit that the U.S. will be hosting in 2020. Mr. Trump added that Mr. Putin might decline the invitation "psychologically" since Russia was kicked out of the Group of Eight in 2014 for the annexation of Crimea.

Illustration on U.S. Russian relations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sam Nunn and nuclear war

I had some dealings with Sam Nunn several decades ago, when he was Sen. Sam Nunn of Georgia. Growing up in Savannah, I applied to be a cadet at the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1981. Consequently, I had to drive multiple times by myself to be interviewed by Mr. Nunn's staff in Atlanta for consideration for a USAFA appointment, which in the end was a successful quest.

President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, Friday, June 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Mr. President: Send Sam Nunn to Moscow

Nowadays it is hard for anyone much under the age of 50 to imagine, but once upon a time the threat of nuclear war and the prospect of planetary extinction were things people actually worried about.

Is it about Western values or geopolitics?

When it comes to U.S. foreign policy, what we frequently hear from politicians and mainstream media is that it must be based on the well-known foundations of Western values, such as freedom, democracy, defense of human rights, and the supremacy of the rule of law.

President Donald Trump speaks as he meets with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Realpolitik or democracy now?

Things happen in cycles. Society shifts from conservative to socialist, from freedom to totalitarianism, from faithful to secular. We are experiencing a similar shift now -- from attempting to impose democracy in the world where we had no business doing so, to rationalizing our ability to impact events globally, and applying our limited resources as effectively as we can.

In this file photo taken on Monday, July 16, 2018, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) **FILE**

Russia's role in American politics

It looks like President Trump has a chance to demonstrate the foreign policy pragmatism he campaigned on and was elected for in 2016 at this month's Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

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