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  • The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-13M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan.  (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)

    Moscow: Continue U.S. cooperation in space

    Moscow wants to work with Washington to further space exploration despite a recent NASA memo noting the crisis in Ukraine has nearly severed prospects for partnership, Russian officials say.

  • In this image from NASA-TV shows the Cygnus cargo spacecraft after it was grappled by the International Space Station's Canadarm Wednesday July 16, 2014 as the pair flew over Kenya. The Cygnus spacecraft is filled with over 3,000 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station in the company's second contracted cargo delivery flight to the space station for NASA. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)

    NASA: 'We're very, very close' to proving existence of alien life

    NASA scientists say it won't be long before they're able to prove that life on other planets really does exist.

  • Moon shot: This photo of astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin taken on the lunar surface 45 years ago has become one of the most iconic images of human history. (NASA via Associated Press)

    Astronaut Buzz Aldrin presses need for space exploration

    Forty-five years after man first landed on the moon, one of the men who was there is worried that the U.S. has become lost in space.

  • In this undated image provided by NASA a saucer-shaped test vehicle holding equipment for landing large payloads on Mars is shown in the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. On Wednesday, June 11, 2014 weather permitting, a balloon carrying the saucer-shaped vehicle is set to launch from Hawaii.  (AP Photo/NASA)

    NASA to test Mars 'flying saucer' vehicle on Earth

    After several weather delays, NASA will try to launch a "flying saucer" into Earth's atmosphere Saturday to test technology that could be used to land on Mars.

  • EDITORIAL: Rigged 'science'

    A fractured Supreme Court on Monday largely upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's radical rule designed to shut down the power plants that produce the most affordable electricity. The justices continue to accept the EPA's labeling of carbon dioxide as a "pollutant." This harmless gas, the agency insists, is melting the planet.

  • Infographic: NASA to launch satellite to study climate change

    The cause of global warming is a contentious one. What NASA is up to could give us the data we need to understand it more fully.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) and Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin attend a meeting while visiting the Rostvertol helicopter manufacturing company in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Alexei Nikolsky, Presidential Press Service)

    EDITORIAL: NASA's 'Rocket to Nowhere' could hijack private spaceflights

    NASA lives in the shadow of its former glory, the remembrance of the days when the nation held its breath every time a rocket left Cape Canaveral and cheered every touchdown.

  • No trampoline for the astronauts

    NASA lives in the shadow of its former glory, the remembrance of the days when the nation held its breath every time a rocket left Cape Canaveral and cheered every touchdown. Now the space shuttle has been mothballed, and prospects of a new ship to carry Americans to space are tarnished by setbacks and cost overruns. The only way an American astronaut can get into space now is to hitch a ride on a Russian rocket.

  • In this undated image provided by NASA a saucer-shaped test vehicle holding equipment for landing large payloads on Mars is shown in the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. On Wednesday, June 11, 2014 weather permitting, a balloon carrying the saucer-shaped vehicle is set to launch from Hawaii.  (AP Photo/NASA)

    NASA postpones Mars 'flying saucer' test on Earth

    Bad weather is preventing NASA from launching a "flying saucer" into Earth's atmosphere to test technology that could be used to land on Mars.

  • NASA review: We're not going to Mars

    A 286-page government report 18 months in the making could burst the bubble of aspiring space explorers with a disheartening conclusion: We're not going to Mars.

  • NASA to test giant Mars parachute on Earth

    The skies off the Hawaiian island of Kauai will be a stand-in for Mars as NASA prepares to launch a saucer-shaped vehicle in an experimental flight designed to land heavy loads on the red planet.

  • Plans unveiled for new 'space taxi' to transport U.S. astronauts

    A fledgling space company has announced its plan for using a "space taxi" to shuttle NASA astronauts back and forth to the International Space Station.

  • Garrett Reisman, program lead for crew vehicles of the SpaceX, stands inside the SpaceX Dragon V2 at the headquarters on Thursday, May 29, 2014, in Hawthorne, Calif. SpaceX, which has flown unmanned cargo capsules to the International Space Station, unveiled the new spacecraft Thursday designed to ferry astronauts to low-Earth orbit. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

    5 things to know about SpaceX's flight plans

    SpaceX has made supply runs to the International Space Station under a NASA contract. Now it's eyeing carrying astronauts to low-Earth orbit. NASA is depending on private companies to fill the void left by the retirement of its space shuttle fleet.

  • Elon Musk unveils spacecraft to ferry astronauts

    A company that has flown unmanned capsules to the Space Station unveiled a spacecraft Thursday designed to ferry up to seven astronauts to low-Earth orbit that SpaceX founder Elon Musk says will revolutionize access to space.

  • 5 things to know about SpaceX's flight plans

    SpaceX has made supply runs to the International Space Station under a NASA contract. Now it's eyeing carrying astronauts to low-Earth orbit. NASA is depending on private companies to fill the void left by the retirement of its space shuttle fleet.

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