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  • FILE - This April 17, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. During his upcoming trip to Asia, the president and the region's leaders will be keeping close watch on the Russian troops amassed on Ukraine's border and the status of a tenuous diplomatic deal aimed at keeping those forces at bay. In Asia, the U.S. response to the Ukraine crisis is being viewed through the prism of the region's own territorial disputes China. Japan and the Philippines _ two of the four countries Obama will visit _ are locked in tense disputes with Beijing over islands in the South and East China Seas and will be seeking reassurances that the U.S. would back them if the conflicts boiled over. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    Asia seeks Obama's assurance in territorial spats

    As President Barack Obama travels through Asia this coming week, he will confront a region that's warily watching the crisis in Ukraine through the prism of its own territorial tensions with China.

  • FILE - In this July 1, 2012 file photo, Jeeps sit for sale at a Chrysler dealership in Springfield, Ill. Fiat and Chrysler announced an agreement Saturday, April 19, 2014, that they will build three new Jeep models in China for the local market, the biggest for Jeeps outside the U.S. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)

    Fiat and Chrysler to build 3 Jeep models in China

    Fiat and Chrysler announced plans Saturday to build three new Jeep models in China for that market, the biggest for the vehicles outside the United States, as they attempt to boost sales in a country where they lag behind their competitors.

  • Ben and Ulysses Go to China Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    SYKES: Obama's green-energy boondoggles leave taxpayers in red

    It's been more than five years since President Obama signed his misguided economic-stimulus package into law, creating green-energy subsidies and expanding others, but American taxpayers are still feeling its disastrous effects.

  • Wissler

    Inside China: Marine's comment on islands draws sharp Chinese response

    A casual remark by a U.S. general during a breakfast has made China mad, really mad, and Beijing's response is far less than civil and humble.

  • Cibulkova reaches Malaysian Open quarterfinals

    Top-seeded Dominika Cibulkova of Slovakia needed just over an hour to beat Su-Wei Hsieh of Taiwan 6-1, 6-2 Thursday to reach the quarterfinals of Malaysian Open.

  • Cars drive under a grid of power lines crossing the 5 Highway Friday, March 27, 1998, in Los Angeles. California will try a second time to launch a deregulated, $23 billion electricity market designed to lower rates and improve efficiency through competition. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    Inside the Ring: U.S. power grid defenseless from attacks

    The U.S. electrical power grid is vulnerable to cyber and physical attacks that could cause devastating disruptions throughout the country, federal and industry officials told Congress recently.

  • A Chinese clerk counts U.S. dollars in exchange for Chinese renminbi at a Hefei, China, bank. (Associated Press)

    U.S. Treasury warns China on currency

    In unusually pointed language, the U.S. Treasury on Tuesday warned China and Japan that it is closely watching them out of concern they may be intentionally depreciating their currencies to gain an advantage in trade with U.S. competitors.

  • Branstad scandal ensnares key Iowa link to China

    Chinese Association of Iowa executive director Swallow Yan has helped connect Gov. Terry Branstad with Chinese presidents and residents, boosting relations between a farming state and a growing superpower with a huge demand for Iowa's agricultural exports.

  • Norway restores, donates 1927 silent film to China

    Norway donated a restored Chinese silent film from the 1920s to China's national film archive on Tuesday, despite a prolonged diplomatic chill between the countries over the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize.

  • This undated publicity photo released by courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures, shows Ben Barnes, left, as Tom Ward, and Jeff Bridges, as Master Gregory, in Warner Bros. Pictures' and Legendary Pictures' fantasy action adventure film, "Seventh Son," a Warner Bros. Pictures release. China's state-owned film distributor is making its first investment in Hollywood movies by taking a stake in two Legendary Entertainment productions. China Film Co. will make an "eight-figure equity investment" in two upcoming films, "Seventh Son" and "Warcraft," the Chinese unit of Legendary Entertainment said Tuesday, April 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures/Legendary Pictures, Kimberly French) NO SALES

    China Film takes 1st stake in Hollywood movies

    China's state-owned film distributor is making its first investment in Hollywood movies by taking a stake in two Legendary Entertainment productions.

  • Southern agrees to coal research with Chinese firm

    Southern Co. says it has signed a deal with a state-owned Chinese coal and energy company to work together to develop coal technologies, based in part on the coal gasification and carbon capture technology that Southern subsidiary Mississippi Power Co. is deploying at the $5 billion Kemper County power plant.

  • U.S. missing out on big opportunities in Africa, Liberian official says

    The U.S. is missing out on a lucrative opportunity to invest in an expanding African market, even as China steadily grows its economic footprint across the continent, one of Liberia's top economic officials warned in an interview.

  • ** FILE ** International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde accompanied by IMFC Chair and Singapore Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam, arrive for a news conference during the World Bank Group-International Monetary Fund Spring Meetings in Washington, Saturday, April 12, 2014. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    IMF gives U.S. Congress year-end deadline for passing reforms

    The 188 members of the International Monetary Fund on Sunday gave the U.S. Congress until the end of the year to pass reforms giving large emerging countries like Russia and China a greater say in the Bretton Woods Institution, after which they may make plans to reform the IMF without the U.S.

  • Panama Canal project could take away from Arizona

    Economic trade winds could blow away from Arizona someday because of a multibillion-dollar project taking place thousands of miles away.

  • Ala. DJ creates his own beat in China

    Music has always been his life, but Dusty MacDonald had no idea that it would eventually lead him to a successful career, and a new wife, halfway around the world.

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