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In this Aug. 14, 2017, photo distributed Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un acknowledges a welcome from the military officers during his visit to Korean People's Army's Strategic Forces in North Korea. The Korean Central News Agency said Tuesday that Kim during an inspection of the KPA's Strategic Forces praised the military for drawing up a "close and careful" plan. Kim said he will give order for the missile test if the United States continues its "extremely dangerous actions" on the Korean Peninsula. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

North Korea, post-Trump 'fire and fury' rhetoric, caves on Guam strike

- The Washington Times

North Korea just backed away from its wildly wild vow to take out Guam, turning down the heat a notch on what was becoming the media's most favored message of late -- the one that painted President Donald Trump as the crazed White House madman, steadily leading America toward a path of fire and destruction. Hmm. Guess who's red-faced now?

In this Sept. 24, 2011, file photo, George Soros speaks during a forum at the IMF/World Bank annual meetings in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

George Soros hitting U.S. Lobby Town hard

- The Washington Times

Billionaire George Soros, no doubt still reeling from the White House win of President Donald Trump, has decided to pour even more money into Congress, in hopes of furthering his progressive visions, a new report finds. And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why you shouldn't trust any member of Congress

Alissa Ellis chants while blocking an intersection during a rally Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Durham, N.C. Protesters toppled a nearly century-old statue of a Confederate soldier Monday at the rally against racism. The Durham protest was in response to a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. (Casey Toth/The Herald-Sun via AP)

Confederate statues today, book burnings tomorrow

- The Washington Times

A crowd of ignorant protesters pulled down a bronze Confederate statue that stood before a county government building in Durham, North Carolina -- the angry national backlash to the Charlottesville brouhaha over the Robert E. Lee monument.

People stand in solidarity with the victims in Charlottesville, Va., during a vigil at the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Memorial Statue in North Las Vegas, Nev., Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017. Protesters decrying hatred and racism converged around the country on Sunday, saying they felt compelled to counteract the white supremacist rally that spiraled into deadly violence in Virginia. (Elizabeth Brumley/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)

No, McMaster, not all fear-based violence is 'terrorism'

- The Washington Times

H.R. McMaster, President Donald Trump's national security adviser, said during a television talk show interview the violence in Charlottesville over the fate of a Robert E. Lee statue and the fatality that resulted "meets the definition of terrorism." That's a pretty broad definition he's using. And wrongly so.

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster listens as President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after a security briefing at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

H.R. McMaster foes slammed as 'Islamophobes,' 'white supremacists'

- The Washington Times

H.R. McMaster, President Trump's choice of national security adviser, has what some say is a shady record of defense of Israel -- and what others outright label as subversive to America's interests. Now, the Council on American Islamic Relations jumped to McMaster's defense. But that alone is a red flag. Having CAIR as a friend isn't exactly exonerating.

This Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Leftover opioids are a common dilemma for surgery patients; a study published Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, suggests that after several common operations most don't use all their pills and many store the remainders unsafely at home. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot) ** FILE **

Opioids: In defense of the pain pills

- The Washington Times

If you've never experienced chronic pain, or been around someone with a pain that just won't end, it's easy to dismiss opioids as evil and to make grand calls for their prescription restriction, or even outright bans.

Immigration rights activists chant anti-Trump slogans as they urge Republican lawmakers in Florida to firmly oppose President Donald Trump's proposals to increase funding for immigration enforcement as deadlines for budget decisions near in Congress, Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, in Doral, Fla. Dian Alarcon, second from right, said Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart's office told a smaller group on Tuesday the border wall measure would likely not be approved in the Senate. Diaz-Balart's chief of staff Cesar Gonzalez told members of the media he would not comment. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Dianne Feinstein rips Trump as 'cruel' for deporting illegals

- The Washington Times

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, on the heels of a deportation that led to a separated family, issued a scathing statement against President Donald Trump, suggesting his border controls were beyond what's necessary for national security. She also called him really, really mean, and that she might tell his mother on him if he doesn't cut it out.

Former National Security Adviser Susan E. Rice's checkered history continues to haunt her in the post-Obama era. (Associated Press)

Susan Rice's ridiculous North Korea recommendation to Trump

- The Washington Times

Susan Rice offered up some recommendations to President Trump, on his dealings with North Korea, that went pretty much like this: Do nothing. Her advice, by way of an opinion piece in the New York Times, is titled, "It's Not Too Late on North Korea." A better title, though, is this: "Why America's So Happy Barack Obama's Gone."

Trump's 'fire and fury' sure beats Obama's butt-kissing

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, as the media's been steadily reporting for hours now, has vowed to respond to North Korea's ongoing threats against the United States with "fire and fury." The timid have gasped. But the truth is: North Korea deserves this response. The regime brought it on itself. And without a doubt, Trump's hardline approach beats Barack Obama's timid wait-and-see approach.

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