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Barack Obama      Associated Press photo

Rough justice for Obama and the Saudis

- The Washington Times

Throwing a stone at Saudi Arabia, where stoning women is the national sport, is great fun, and nobody deserves an occasional stoning like the Saudis, just to let the king and his legion of princes know how it feels.

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It's the conceit of every age that it's uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it's the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we're getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It's a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Michael Dukakis (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Reading the handwriting on the wall

- The Washington Times

Everything old becomes new, if you wait long enough. Barack Obama "reassures" the nation in the wake of another radical Islamic attack on New York City and in nearby New Jersey, and a frenzy of stabbing in a shopping mall in Minnesota.

George Washington

Hillary Clinton demonstrates the peril in running a mouth

- The Washington Times

The moving finger -- the one that having writ moved on and can't recall a single line (per Omar Khayyam's famous poem) -- is the enemy of all of us, and never more than to somebody called on to write or say something in public. We've even confiscated a word for it, "gaffe." A gaffe is not usually a mistake but what happens when someone blurts out an inconvenient truth.

Nancy Pelosi (Associated Press)

The Clinton campaign's plea for Republican mercy

- The Washington Times

Nancy Pelosi, trying to choke back panic as the presidential race tightens and concern grows over Hillary Clinton's obviously fragile health, has appealed to Paul Ryan's sense of gallantry. The little lady needs a little help. She begs him not to "let" his party use anything damaging to the Democrats that turns up in emails hacked from Democratic email servers. And no talk about Hillary's health either.

John F. Kennedy (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Questions about Hillary's health

- The Washington Times

When questions were raised about Barack Obama's birth, and whether he was actually eligible to be president of the United States, he brushed the questions aside as if answering them was beneath the dignity of a prince of the crown. He let the questions fester for years before putting them to rest.

Alexis de Tocqueville

Helping those who help themselves in Baton Rouge

- The Washington Times

America is a remarkable country, and sometimes it takes a disaster to remind us of how remarkable it is. The millions who indulge a little self-pity over having to choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton should look to Baton Rouge for another view.

Rosa Luxemburg (Associated Press)

Black Lives Matter and the endless war against the Jews

- The Washington Times

The man who controls the language controls the conversation, as George Orwell rightly observed. The word that the left is trying, with a certain success, to appropriate now is "genocide." Genocide is what Hitler set out to do, to exterminate Europe's Jews (and who knows where his evil ambition would have gone from there).

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

For sale, the most brazen president money can buy

- The Washington Times

It's coming clear now why Hillary Clinton wanted her own email server, free from oversight by anyone, and why she resisted so ferociously enabling anyone from getting even a hint to what she was hiding. Her presidency, if there is one, has been sold, and a new batch of emails pried out of the government by Judicial Watch reveals the going rate for Hillary.

President Barack Obama is seated in the presidential vehicle as his motorcade leaves after playing a round of golf at Farm Neck Golf Course in Oak Bluffs, Mass., on Martha's Vineyard, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The humiliation of a president

- The Washington Times

"We do not pay ransom. We didn't here, and we won't in the future." Barack Obama might like to have that one back this morning, to stick a pin in the moving finger that writes. But the finger done writ, and it won't come back to cancel a single line of the president's fatuous fib that the United States didn't pay $400 million to ransom four hostages taken by the president's friends in Tehran.

FBI Director James B. Comey. (Associated Press)

Life is just fairer to some than to others

- The Washington Times

Millions of Americans, mostly Democrats but a few sourball Republicans, tell pollsters and anyone who doesn't want to listen that they're preparing themselves to ignore the stink and shame of Hillary Clinton when they vote in November. They're advised here to prepare themselves for a protracted season of malaise and buyer's remorse.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gives a speech on the economy after touring Futuramic Tool & Engineering, in Warren, Mich., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

When a presidential race rages out of control

- The Washington Times

It's the conceit of every generation that horses have never been faster, whisky has never been older, beautiful women have never been younger — and politics have never been rowdier. But maybe our generation has a legitimate claim.

John F. Kennedy    Associated Press photo

Hillary's falls recall the health questions JFK tried to dodge

- The Washington Times

The health of a prospective president is one of the most important issues of any campaign, but whether to ask hard questions about a candidate is usually a matter of whose prospective president, and whose health. When the prospective president is a Democrat, the media only sends candy, flowers and best wishes.

An untold woman's story of World War II

- The Washington Times

One morning in early 1942, with the nation suddenly at war and not doing very well at it, President Franklin D. Roosevelt summoned Sen. Kenneth D. McKellar, a crusty old senator from Tennessee, to the White House. The president explained that he had to hide a billion dollars in the budget for a super-secret defense plant.

Warren G. Harding (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump, the unstoppable force of nature -- maybe

- The Washington Times

The dogs bark, the flies scatter, the gasbags at the conventions send enormous clouds of toxic waste to hover over Cleveland and Philadelphia that won't dissipate until Labor Day, and the caravan moves on. Election Day approaches, and rarely have so many been so disappointed with the choice before us.

Tim Kaine (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A sad tale of two disposable veeps

- The Washington Times

A governor is always a good choice for a vice president. He (or she) has learned how to run an administration, how to work with a cranky legislature and understands staying close to the people who elected him. There's no Praetorian guard to keep him separated from the people.

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