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Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A day to separate the losers

- The Washington Times

This is the day that divides winners and losers, and it's fashionable to say it's about time. But watching the losers of aught-16 do it unto themselves was the best part of the show.

Ronald Reagan campaigning in 1980

Reprising Hillary's choke of 2008

- The Washington Times

Choking is never pretty to watch, whether by a football team, in a child or by a political candidate suddenly running in blind panic. Nobody does the choke better than Hillary Clinton.

FBI Director James B. Comey. (Associated Press)

Now, or later, the Clintons are toast

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is learning at long last that when your opponent is destroying himself -- or herself -- you should get out of his way. The opponent deserves ample room to do the deed. The Donald is taking the high road past Hillary Clinton's hell week.

Trig Dommer, 4, of Sioux Falls, checks out the voting booth next to his mom Naomi Dommer as she fills out her ballot during the South Dakota Primary Election, Tuesday, June 7, 2016, at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Sioux Falls, S.D. (Joe Ahlquist/Argus Leader via AP)

A suspicious wind in the rigging

- The Washington Times

There's no such thing as voter fraud, as the Democrats and right-thinking press mavens have been telling us for weeks, but some curious things are happening out there in flyover country. Some of the assurances that all is well on the old ship of state have been caught in what looks suspiciously like the rigging.

John Podsesta (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming media settlement with Hillary

- The Washington Times

There's no one more repentant and eager to promise reform than the town drunk coming off a week at the bottom of a bottle. Some of "the top political reporters in the country," as they think of themselves, will be soon looking for similar redemption.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes the stage for the third presidential debate at University of Nevada in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary as ladies' fashion leader. Who knew?

- The Washington Times

Nobody has accused Hillary Clinton of setting an example of how to dress for success, and certainly not for fun. She's clearly no Melania Trump. But she may be assisting the Chinese in bringing back "the Mao suit." She probably shouldn't expect a standing ovation from men.

LBJ (Associated Press)

Could the Donald get lost in the rigging?

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump says the November election may be "rigged" against him, and nearly half the voters in one public-opinion poll agrees with him. Even more voters than that say they're not confident their votes will be accurately counted.

Michelle Obama (Associated Press)

Trash talk and the White House

- The Washington Times

The darndest people have ants in their pants in the wake of the revelations of Donald Trump's vulgar trash talk. Who knew such behavior still had the power to offend?

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Hillary and the art of the dirty mouth

Cussin' and talkin' dirty is ugly stuff, ugliest of all in the mouths of women, who, despite everything the feminists can do to insist on equality (with a few caveats), are usually a little more refined than men. Most of them. Most of the time.

In this Dec. 10, 2009, file photo, President and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Barack Obama poses with his medal and diploma at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony at City Hall in Oslo. (AP Photo/John McConnico, File)

If this is peace, why fear war?

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama will soon be gone, banished to a smaller house down the street from the mosque, and peace, alas, will not be upon him. The anti-war president leaves behind a world with more war than it had when he first moved into the White House.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange stands on the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, Feb. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)

And now the season of October surprises

- The Washington Times

The season of "the October surprise" is hard upon us, but this year we're getting the October surprise on the installment plan. There's a medium-sized surprise with the morning paper every day.

Barack Obama      Associated Press photo

Rough justice for Obama and the Saudis

- The Washington Times

Throwing a stone at Saudi Arabia, where stoning women is the national sport, is great fun, and nobody deserves an occasional stoning like the Saudis, just to let the king and his legion of princes know how it feels.

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It's the conceit of every age that it's uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it's the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we're getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It's a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Michael Dukakis (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Reading the handwriting on the wall

- The Washington Times

Everything old becomes new, if you wait long enough. Barack Obama "reassures" the nation in the wake of another radical Islamic attack on New York City and in nearby New Jersey, and a frenzy of stabbing in a shopping mall in Minnesota.

George Washington

Hillary Clinton demonstrates the peril in running a mouth

- The Washington Times

The moving finger -- the one that having writ moved on and can't recall a single line (per Omar Khayyam's famous poem) -- is the enemy of all of us, and never more than to somebody called on to write or say something in public. We've even confiscated a word for it, "gaffe." A gaffe is not usually a mistake but what happens when someone blurts out an inconvenient truth.

Nancy Pelosi (Associated Press)

The Clinton campaign's plea for Republican mercy

- The Washington Times

Nancy Pelosi, trying to choke back panic as the presidential race tightens and concern grows over Hillary Clinton's obviously fragile health, has appealed to Paul Ryan's sense of gallantry. The little lady needs a little help. She begs him not to "let" his party use anything damaging to the Democrats that turns up in emails hacked from Democratic email servers. And no talk about Hillary's health either.

John F. Kennedy (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Questions about Hillary's health

- The Washington Times

When questions were raised about Barack Obama's birth, and whether he was actually eligible to be president of the United States, he brushed the questions aside as if answering them was beneath the dignity of a prince of the crown. He let the questions fester for years before putting them to rest.

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