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Only children can defy perceptions

The Washington Times

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

Only children can defy perceptions

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

Use social media, but with caution

"Young job hopefuls not hiding their social media past, survey finds" (Web, Aug. 9) claims that young people seeking employment no longer believe their social media will negatively affect job opportunities. As a young person in the job market, I would say this is true, but with hard exceptions.

Statue not an immigrant beacon

In "Not everyone can join the American nation" (Web, Aug. 8) Clifford May argues that CNN's Jim Acosta was wrong to say that Emma Lazarus' poem, "The New Colossus," inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, set a U.S. policy of admitting immigrants considered the "wretched refuse" of foreign lands. Mr. May argues on prudential grounds, but there is a historical argument, too.

No God? No morality

Your Aug. 7 editorial discusses the banality of urban murder, a sign of our secularist times ("'Nobody kill anybody,' but 'nobody' listened," Web). Regarding the epidemic of big-city violence, reference was made to the solemnity of the biblical Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not kill," but the reality is that the other nine commandments are likewise honored mostly in the breach, in Baltimore and elsewhere. On the streets, life is cheap.

'Fire and fury' diplomacy

Though it wasn't picked up by anyone in the cowering news media, who were busy hiding under their desks when President Trump warned North Korea that if they continued with their provocation, they would face "fire and fury, the likes of which we've never seen before," Mr. Trump was actually testing a little-known theory of his.

Get back to two houses

If President Trump made a blunder during his campaign, it was that he placed all his emphasis on the presidency and did not ask for new Republican members of Congress from the new patriot movement. We sent the same establishment Republicans to Washington, and we are getting the same squishiness and pre-emptive surrender to socialist, statist, totalitarian Democrats we got before.

Empower group to end drug crisis

Forty-five years ago, President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse "public enemy number one" and established a White House special action office to reduce addiction and related deaths. President Trump has called drug abuse a national crisis and signed an executive order establishing the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis. According to the commission's chairman, "to say we have a crisis here is an understatement" and conditions warrant declaration of a state of emergency.

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.

'War' on police a cry for justice

There is no war on cops ("Why the war on cops is a war on all of us," Web, July 19). There is no "guerrilla action" being taken against our country's police force by the political left. And there is no widespread campaign to paint all law-enforcement officers with the same brush. But there is criticism. And it's largely fair.

GOP losing adherents

The Republican Party and I are done. My friends and I are haggling over whether to un-register ourselves and totally opt out of the system or just sit on the sidelines until hell freezes over and the Republican Party supports its elected president. Absent a change of heart to support the president as the leader of the Party, I am resolved.

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