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Demonstrators wearing papier-mch heads representing President Donald Trump and the planet Earth, walk along Pennsylvania Ave., in front of the White House in Washington, during a demonstration and march, Saturday, April 29, 2017. Thousands of people gather across the country to march in protest of President Donald Trump's environmental policies, which have included rolling back restrictions on mining, oil drilling and greenhouse gas emissions at coal-fired power plants. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Climate march madness

America is the land of opportunity for everyone. Since Donald Trump was elected president, there has been no end to the occasions for the losers to pull on their sneakers and take to the streets. They only have to remember the cause of the day and show up with an appropriate sign or banner. Marching is the social life of the lonely and the sore of foot.

Two girls wearing umbrella hats talk at each other on Tiananmen Square during the May Day holiday in Beijing, Monday, May 1, 2017. Millions of Chinese are taking advantage of the May Day holidays to visit popular tourist sites. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

A wary eye on China

China is an important part of the American economy. We're happy to have them buy up our debt, but integrating Chinese companies into the domestic marketplace is another matter. The Chinese economy is in no way transparent as most Western economies are. Without evidence to the contrary, evidence usually difficult to obtain, it's reasonable to presume that any "private" Chinese company is linked to the Chinese government.

Death finally gets a breather

The state of Arkansas finally concluded its hangman's festival, conducting the last of four executions over eight days. Gov. Asa Hutchinson originally set out to impose death on six men, both black and white, over eight days. He was racing the sell-by date on the state's supply of lethal chemicals, but the courts kept getting in his way. The hangman -- perhaps he should be called the "needler" since Arkansas uses drugs, not rope or electricity, to kill -- can rest after the stress of imposing the largest number of executions over so short a number of days in 57 years.

President Trump signed the Executive Order on the Establishment of Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy at The AMES Cos. Inc. in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in April. He requires every new regulation to be accompanied by the elimination of two regulations, resulting in a net reduction in regulations for the first time in U.S. history. (Associated Press/File)

Mr. Trump's first hundred days

Putting a name on the passage of a few months' time and calling it an "era," like celebrating an anniversary, is a conceit mostly of journalists looking for a peg to hang a story on. Some of these so-called eras last, and some don't.

Veterans listen as President Donald Trump speaks before signing an Executive Order on "Improving Accountability and Whistleblower Protection" at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Thursday, April 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Trump's bow to the people

The Antiquities Act of 1906 was a splendid idea. The Act was intended to give presidents limited authority — emphasis on the word "limited" — to designate unique and special landmarks, such as a natural arch, breathtaking mesas or an ancient cliff dwelling that deserves to be preserved for future generations. Certain presidents have abused this authority and seized millions of acres of private land for federal regulation. Barack Obama used the Act 27 times, more than any other president.

A federal police officer puts his machine gun on the edge of the bath in the Hamam Alil spa, south of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday April, 27, 2017. The spa reopened several months ago after the town was liberate from the Islamic State group. Many Iraqi soldiers visit the spa, located half an hour south of Mosul, in between fighting against the Islamic State group for relaxation. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

Pigs on patrol

The noble pig is the most maligned animal of forest and barnyard. The pig sometimes wallows in mud but since he doesn't sweat that's the only way he can keep cool when the weather turns warm (and then hot). Pigs actually make good pets. Pigs can be housebroken — not easily, but it can be done — and they're peaceable and friendly.

U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis, left, and U.S. Marine Corps General Thomas Waldhauser at Camp Lemonnier in Ambouli, Djibouti, Sunday April 23, 2017.   Mattis on Sunday visited Djibouti to bolster ties with the tiny and impoverished African country that is home to an important base for U.S. counterterrorism forces, including drones. (Jonathan Ernst/Pool via AP)

The Russian riddle

News is not called news for nothing. Terror attacks, cruise missile strikes, nuclear provocation -- it all adds up to the headlines of today burying the headlines of yesterday. That's why it's essential to circle back to one story that must not be forgotten, the allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Inquiring minds want to know whether the political mischief, if any, was cause or effect.

U.S. special representative for North Korea policy Joseph Yun, center, answers questions from reporters following meeting with Japanese and South Korean chief nuclear negotiators to talk about North Korean issues at the Iikura Guesthouse in Tokyo Tuesday, April 25, 2017. North Korea marks the founding anniversary of its military on Tuesday, and South Korea and its allies are bracing for the possibility that it could conduct another nuclear test or launch an intercontinental ballistic missile for the first time.   U.S. envoy Yun says he and his counterparts from Japan and South Korea agreed to coordinate "all actions" on North Korea. (Toru Yamanaka/Pool Photo via AP)

Getting serious about North Korea

President Trump has called the entire U.S. Senate to the White House Wednesday for a rare top-level briefing on what's going on with "the crazy fat kid" in North Korea. The president will have all hands on deck and he expects 100 senators to be there. They'll be greeted by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Defense Secretary James Mattis, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

President Trump has arguably done more than his predecessors to get the border wall along the U.S. frontier with Mexico finally realized. Despite congressional promises, little construction progress has yet been made. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

A barrier to the wall

The U.S. government just dodged a headlong run into a wall. Democrats threatened to vote against an interim budget deal if President Trump includes a down payment on a wall on the southern border. It's a mark of the lengths politicians of the liberal persuasion will go to destroy the Trump presidency. National security is held hostage in a high-stakes game of chicken.

A local resident holds a sign as he listens to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speak at a rally for Omaha Democratic mayoral candidate Heath Mello, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Riding the tiger

"He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount," a Chinese proverb cautions the unwary. That's where the Democrats, flailing in a search for a way out of the wilderness, find themselves in their warm embrace of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

FILE -- In this Jan. 16, 2017 file photo, Richard Ratcliffe, husband of imprisoned charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, poses for the media during an Amnesty International led vigil outside the Iranian Embassy in London. The family of Zaghari-Ratcliffe who was detained in Iran while on a trip with her toddler daughter says all efforts to appeal her five-year prison sentence in court have failed. Ratcliffe, who works for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of the news agency, found out this weekend that her appeal to Iran's supreme court failed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

Addicted to uranium

When gentlemen compete, they honor the rules of the game and accept the referee's calls. But no one would mistake the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran for gentlemen, and their gamesmanship in pursuing nuclear weapons is deadly serious. As the mullahs make a bid for more uranium, They have been called out for cheating. The United States is obliged to withhold approval of a new supply of the radioactive material until the regime can prove it's not up to mischief. Anything else is simply tomfoolery.

Associated Press

Preserving voting rights in Maryland

Sometimes the best defense is a good offense, and this is often lost on conservatives. That might be about to change. In battles over protecting voting rights, conservatives are usually put on the defensive by lawyers of the litigious left as they seek sympathetic liberal judges to strike down common-sense ballot-integrity measures enacted by the states.

Associated Press

More reefer madness

Marijuana has gone mainstream, its reputation hardly recognizable from the 1930s when a popular movie called "Reefer Madness" depicted in melodramatic fashion the dangers of smoking cannabis.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan wears cufflinks depicting the Maryland state flag as he signs a bill during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, April 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Confusion in the marketplace

The Maryland legislature has just sent a bill to Gov. Larry Hogan that will, if he signs it, sow confusion in the state's generic drug marketplace and subject consumers to considerable harm. It's bad economics laced with a large dose of politics that begs him to pull out his veto pen and limber up his writing hand.

Dr. Jumana Nagarwala (henryford.com)

Genital mutilation takes a hit

A Michigan physician was charged this week with the ritual mutilation of the genitals of two sisters, one 6 and the other 7 years old, revealing a sordid -- and illegal -- practice in certain Muslim communities that has put up to 500,000 young American girls at risk of this barbaric mutilation.

Eddis Marie Loving, of East Chicago, Ind., holds a sign as supporters and residents of East Chicago, Ind., rally near a public-housing complex Wednesday, April 19, 2017, ahead of a visit by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt. Pruitt was scheduled to to tour the complex where roughly 1,000 people were ordered evacuated because of lead contamination. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

It's Earth Day, not Doomsday

Saturday marks the annual celebration of nature called Earth Day, now in its 47th year. It's further the day set aside for a new event, the March for Science. Which to support? Well, both. The environmentally conscious in the nation's capital can kill two birds with one stone (speaking figuratively, of course) and do both. By showing up on the National Mall, they can refresh their love for humanity's habitat and cheer as well for the scientific programs that guard against abusing the globe. But showing up in a "Make America Great Again" hat won't be wise. Someone burdened with an excess of tolerance might deck such a foolish celebrant with a picket sign. Saturday is not about making America great, but making America green.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders acknowledges the crowd following his speech at the Louisville Palace, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. Sanders told a boisterous crowd Tuesday night in Louisville that Trump has reneged on his promises to working-class voters. He said Democrats should reach out to disillusioned Trump supporters as the out-of-power party tries to recover from last year's election losses. (Sam Upshaw Jr./The Courier-Journal via AP)

Another 'moral victory' for the Democrats

Our earthquakes and landslides just ain't what they used to be. The Democrats, like all political parties on the outs with voters, are entitled to look for hope and solace where they can find it, but the pickings in special congressional elections are so far pretty skimpy.

Supporters of the 'no' vote, chant slogans during a protest against the referendum outcome, on the Aegean Sea city of Izmir, Turkey, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Turkey's main opposition party has filed a formal request seeking Sunday's referendum to be annulled because of voting irregularities. (AP Photo/Emre Tazegul)

Cooking Turkey's goose

Turkey has been bumping along on the ragged margins of democracy for years. With this week's slim approval of a governmental reform referendum, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has proclaimed that the nation can "change gears and continue along our course more quickly."

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May walks out of 10 Downing Street to speak to the media in London, Tuesday April 18, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May announced she will seek early election on June 8 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Theresa May's gamble

Theresa May showed herself Tuesday to be a bit of a gambler, but only a bit. Armed with public-opinion polls revealing an unusual opportunity to trade a sure thing for a better thing, she stunned Britain, surprised Europe and fascinated Washington by calling for new parliamentary elections on June 8.

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