Political Editorials - Washington Times

Editorials

Featured Articles





Related Articles

FILE- In this Sept. 17, 2015 file photo, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara speaks during a news conference in New York.  On Wednesday, March 8, 2017, two days before Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave dozens of the country's top federal prosecutors just hours to resign and clean out their desks, Sessions gave those political appointees a pep talk during a conference call. Bharara said on Saturday, March 11, 2017, that he was fired after refusing to resign. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Gamesmanship in Gotham

Preet Bharara is making a career of being one of 46 U.S. attorneys who was routinely asked to resign by President Trump, who, like his predecessors in the White House, wanted to install his own lawyers in these jobs. Mr. Bharara, who was appointed by Barack Obama for U.S. attorney in New York City, thinks life handed him a lemon and he dreams of making lemonade.

President Donald Trump looks over towards Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, left, after signing an executive order in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, March 13, 2017. Trump signed "Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch". From left are, Mulvaney, Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, UN Ambassador Nikki Haley, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, Vice President Mike Pence, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

What to do about the debt

The federal government collects plenty of money. The problem is that the government spends too much of it. The government wouldn't have this headache if it had heeded the advice of Thomas Jefferson: "Never spend your money before you have earned it."

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer holds up photos of anti-terrorism airport security dogs as he criticizes President Donald Trump Sunday, March 12, 2017, over proposed cuts to the Transportation Security Administration and Coast Guard that the New York Democrat says would put New York at risk, at Schumer's office in New York. The Democrat accused Trump's administration of seeking to slash important funding to free up money to fund a wall at the Mexican border. (AP Photo/Julie Walker)

Bring in the clowns

The confirmation hearings for Rod J. Rosenstein, nominated to be the deputy U.S. attorney general, have descended from the grand act of political theater promised by Sen. Chuck Schumer, the leader of the Democratic minority in the Senate, to a clown show.

More days without a woman

One clear indication of what The Washington Post calls the "harder-edged" ideology of the women who marched in Washington on "A Day Without a Woman," were the demands for rescinding what they call "the global gag rule."

Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Donald Trump speaks with Michelle DeLaune, right, from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The sour smell of success

It's not necessarily true that "any publicity is good publicity," but Ivanka Trump might think so. Her fashion line was famously dropped by several department stores, and some of the many foes of her father organized a boycott of her goods. The result is a remarkable spike in sales — to near record levels, according to her company.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with leaders from small community banks, Thursday, March 9, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump economy

There's no denying it, the election of Donald Trump has set off a boomlet in the economy, and it promises to expand into a genuine boom once his pro-growth policies have become comfortably settled and guiding the economy. "It's the economy, stupid," and Stupid seems to have finally learned a thing or two.

House Speaker Paul Ryan vigorously talks up the American Health Care Act at Republican National Committee Headquarters. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The second draft of repeal and replace

There's been a lot of histrionics over the first draft of the Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill. Everyone should take a deep breath to prevent a Republicans intraparty knife fight, which would play into the waiting hands of Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi.

FILE - In this July 24, 2009, file photo, Rachel Dolezal, a leader of the Human Rights Education Institute, stands in front of a mural she painted at the institute's offices in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Court documents show Dolezal legally changed her name to Nkechi Amare Diallo on Oct. 7, 2016.(AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File)

Wishing on a star

Identity politics, the notion that you can be who you want to be just by saying so, is a game any number can play. Indeed, a visitor from Mars (or maybe it was Pluto) who was dispatched to Earth to find out just what kind of nuts we are, is said to have written home that Earth may be the most curious planet in any galaxy.

President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 7, 2017, during a meeting with the Republican House whip team about the proposed health bill. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Closing ranks to repeal and replace

There's "a time to break down," the Bible teaches, "and a time to build up." This is the moment for both, and the moment is called "repeal and replace." The end of Obamacare and the birth of the American Health Care Act are upon us this week, now that crucial parts of the proposed replacement law have been revealed. Securing a better health care system was the promise to the American people that put Donald Trump in the White House. Enacting a viable alternative won't guarantee Mr. Trump a happy presidency, but failure to do it would guarantee a miserable presidency.

In this Sept. 21, 2016, file photo, soft drink and soda bottles are displayed in a refrigerator at El Ahorro market in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

When a sugar tax goes sour

In politics as in physics, for every action there's an equal and opposite reaction. You don't have to be Sir Isaac Newton to understand that a steep "sugary drinks tax" on soda drinks would sharply cut sales of Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Mountain Dew, Dr Pepper, Gatorade and others.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, congratulates the first woman in space, cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova, on her 80th birthday in Moscow, Russia, Monday, March 6, 2017. (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Boogermen under the bed

The Red Scare is back, only this time in another color. Beige is the new red. The frightened folks this time are not the Republicans, but the Democrats, though it's not at all clear that the Democrats are so much frightened as villains posing as opportunists.

FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2017 file photo, the Capitol is seen at sunup in Washington. House Republicans on March 6,  released their long-awaited plan for unraveling former President Barack Obama's health care law, a package that would scale back the government's role in health care and likely leave more Americans uninsured. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Mocking John F. Kennedy

The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation had a momentous announcement on March 2. The foundation would honor Barack Obama, who was off on a shopping excursion with Michelle at the time, with the JFK prize for "elevating the standard of political courage in a new century."

A man passes a section of border fencing that separates Tijuana, Mexico, with San Diego. (Associated Press)

Throwing rocks at the wall

Something there is that doesn't love a wall, the poet Robert Frost wrote, but he never had to consider how an uncontrolled border works. Nevertheless, the Democrats, who regard the southern border as an ATM machine that dispenses prospective voters, vow to keep the funding for President Trump's Mexican border wall out of any short-term spending bill.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions (Associated Press)

Those nefarious Russians

The Russians are a nefarious gang. They send their ambassador to public meetings where he is likely to run into senators, other ambassadors, generals, admirals, bishops and who knows who else, and is quick to talk to them. Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi recommend keeping the poor fellow locked up in the ambassadorial residence on 16th Street, lest he ruin the career of someone in official Washington with whom he inadvertently wishes a good day.

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Va., Thursday, March 2, 2017 for his first visit to the Hampton Roads area since taking office in January. The purpose of his visit was to deliver a speech in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier Ford at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Bill Tiernan/The Virginian-Pilot via AP)

Tax reform could be at hand

President Trump, in his remarkable speech earlier this week urged Democrats and Republicans to come together to "move the nation forward." One place to co-operate — you might think all could agree — is on tax reform.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2017 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks during his final presidential news conference in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation announced Thursday, March 2, 2017, that former President Obama will receive the 2017 Centennial John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for his enduring commitment to democratic ideals and elevating the standard of political courage in a new century. The award will be given in a ceremony on May 7 at the library in Boston. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

A Democrat's sad lot

Despite the noise he or she can make, a Democrat's lot is not a happy one. If you're a Democrat you have a choice of joining either the Hysteria Chorus or the Denial Chorale. Either way, you won't accomplish much except a painfully sore throat.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with House and Senate leadership, Wednesday, March 1, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's second chance

The Democrats finally got a cup of strong black coffee Tuesday night, something to help them finally come down from their epic post-election hangover. Donald Trump's remarkable speech to Congress was notable for its tone, the public reaction it engendered and the way it left so may critical listeners speechless.

A painting of former President Teddy Roosevelt is displayed above Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, left, and first lady Melania Trump, right, as President Donald Trump speaks before signing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order in the Roosevelt Room in the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Rolling up red tape

The chains are coming off. Bound tightly by the regulatory state, U.S. industry has been hobbled for what seems like forever. President Trump has wasted no time demonstrating his desire to unleash the economy and enable it to roar to life again. It's the way to make America great again.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, center, before signing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room in the White House in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Thuggery at Town Hall

Rep. Dave Brat represents the 7th Congressional District of Virginia, but the real "brats" in his district are the liberal activists who disrupted his town hall the other day, spoiling it for constituents left and right, Democrats and Republicans, who were to have a rational discussion of issues important to them.

President Donald Trump speaks as he signs the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room in the White House in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Behind is no place for a leader

Killing people and breaking things is what war is all about, and all indications are that Donald Trump understands that. He was elected in large part to execute a war-fighting mission that Barack Obama stubbornly refused to pursue. It's no less than necessary to guard the nation against radical Islamic terrorism.

© Copyright 2017 The Washington Times, LLC
3600 New York Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002

Switch to Desktop version