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President Donald Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump waves to onlookers as he enters Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Fla., for an Easter Service, Sunday, April 16, 2017. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

The war for Trump's ear

There's an ominous rumble of war in Korea, there's always an ominous rumble of war in the Middle East, but in Washington we've already got the real thing. The combatants are taking no prisoners and the rules of the Geneva Convention do not apply.

Ohio State kicker Sean Nuernberger plays in their NCAA college spring football game Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Guns are big, but football's bigger

Guns are big in Arkansas, but hogs and football can be bigger. The National Rifle Association took on the Razorbacks of the University of Arkansas over a law that would have enabled fans to take their guns to the game, and the Razorbacks won.

Hooded penitents from "Jesus con la Cruz a Cuestas" brotherhood hold lanterns with candles they take part in a traditional annual Holy Week procession in Segovia, Spain, Thursday, April 13, 2017. Hundreds of processions take place throughout Spain during the Easter Holy Week. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

The Passion of the Christ

Straightaway in the morning, the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered Him to Pilate.

FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2017, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Promising to "expose the Republican Party for what it is," Sanders predicted April 12, that President Donald Trump would be a one-term president as the liberal icon prepared to launch a nationwide tour to rally Democrats. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Fizzler in Kansas, surviving hopes in Georgia

Congressional Democrats were counting on two special elections this month to provide the smelling salts to revive their dispirited ranks. The first, on Tuesday in Kansas, fizzled. Now all hope is focused on a reliably red district in the suburbs of Atlanta.

People watch a TV news program showing a file image of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, April 12, 2017. North Korea's parliament convened Tuesday amid heightened tensions on the divided peninsula, with the United States and South Korea conducting their biggest-ever military exercises and the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier heading to the area in a show of American strength. The signs read "The USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier changes route". (AP Photo/Ahn Yooung-joon)

Calculating the threat from North Korea

"The land of the morning calm" is anything but that. The ancient Korean name for the divided peninsula is belied by the tension simmering for nearly 70 years, enlivened with frequent bursts of cross-border invective and sometimes violence.

FILE - In this July 8, 2015, file photo, United Airlines and United Express planes prepare to takeoff at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston. After a man is dragged off a United Express flight on Sunday, April 9, 2017, United Airlines becomes the butt of jokes online and on late-night TV. Travel and public-relations experts say United has fumbled the situation from the start, but its impossible to know if the damage is temporary or lasting. Air travelers are drawn to the cheapest price no matter the name on the plane. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, FIle)

The unfriendly skies

One man's misery can be another man's meat, and business-school students looking for a lesson in how not to turn a manageable crisis into an uncontrolled public-relations catastrophe will owe United Airlines a debt for years to come.

In this April 22, 2015, file photo, a member of the Baltimore Police Department stands guard outside of the department's Western District police station as men hold their hands up in protest during a march for Freddie Gray in Baltimore. In a city that became emblematic of police abuse, excessive force and callous treatment of young black men, Baltimore's mayor and commissioner say they are eager and ready to change not only the culture of law enforcement, but the practice. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

The violent legacy of Freddie Gray

Healing is preferable to hurting but much harder to achieve. That's the lesson in Baltimore two years after the death of Freddie Gray, whose death in police custody set off riots and mayhem. Faced with a choice between escalating crime and aggressive policing, the city has spurned the advice of the Trump administration and stuck with a strategy that promises more pain and heartbreak.

President Trump decided that inaction against Syria posed far greater risk to the U.S. than action. (Associated Press/File)

A bad week for a rogue

Action speaks louder than red lines. Accepting the mantle of the leader of the free world, Donald Trump has just done what Barack Obama vowed to do, and never did. The sight of Syrian civilians massacred in a chemical weapons attack prompted President Trump to punish the Assad regime in the name of humanity. Next for a reckoning are Syria's more formidable protectors, Russia and Iran, which have drawn their own red lines. Fresh to the world stage, the dealmaker has put unruly powers on notice that he is as likely to strike a target as a bargain.

President Donald Trump watches as Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy administers the judicial oath to Judge Neil Gorsuch during a re-enactment in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, April 10, 2017, in Washington. Gorsuch's wife Marie Louise hold a bible at center. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

An early test of the Gorsuch court

The fireworks over the elevation of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court — he was sworn in Monday as the ninth justice — overshadowed a perversion of the law by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago that could offer an early indication of the tilt of the newly restored Supreme Court.

In this Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, file photo, Judge Neil Gorsuch stands with his wife Marie Louise Gorsuch as President Donald Trump announces him as his choice for the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Nine again

Neil Gorsuch is finally safe as a justice of the United States Supreme Court, survivor of a cheap campaign to impugn his character and his knowledge and devotion to the Constitution and the law. The justices number nine again, and Donald Trump has redeemed one of his most important promises.

President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Sunday, April 9, 2017. Trump is returning from a trip to his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A decisive week for the world

Donald Trump finally had a pretty good week after several weeks that were not so good. The U.S. Senate finally confirmed Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, overcoming partisan opposition for opposition's sake, and his missile strike on the government forces of Bashar Assad stunned nearly everybody, destroying the Syrian air force base that launched the chemical strikes on Assad's own people.

Mark Hainds, a 48-year-old junior community college forestry professor from Andalusia, Alabama, walks about 3 miles from his stopping point, near Why, Ariz., Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Heck on the border

There's change coming on the border. Republicans on the House Ways and Means Committee are working to make Speaker Paul Ryan's tax reform scheme palatable enough to sell to a cranky chamber. It's a high wall to climb over.

Public Affairs Officer Josh Hammond is reflected in a puddle as restoration work on the USS Constitution continues, Wednesday, April 5, 2017, at the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. The ship enters dry dock for below-the-waterline repairs every 20 years. The world's oldest commissioned warship afloat is scheduled to return to the waters in late July. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Roping in the cost of ships

Every sailor worth his salt knows the old knock: A boat is a hole in the water where you pour the money in. For Navy-size vessels, that hole in the water can be bottomless. As he commands the ship of state, President Trump has made it clear he intends to rebuild the nation's shrunken defense. While doling out cash to the warfighting services, the president should keep a weather eye on Navy shipbuilding contracts. They shouldn't dig that hole deeper than it should be.

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2016 file photo Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington. Reid and John Boehner are going to co-chair a new public policy think tank at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. MGM Resorts International and UNLV plan to bring plans for the institute headed by the retired U.S. Senate Democratic majority leader from Nevada and the former House Republican speaker from Ohio before Nevada university regents on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Banish the trolls

There's an entire class of litigants in patent law that lawyers call "venue-shoppers." U.S. district courts in East Texas and Delaware have become the go-to venues, courts likely to produce huge judgments in plaintiffs' favor. Courts in these jurisdictions have shown themselves to be sympathetic to the trolls, or as they call themselves, "patent-assertion entities."

The permanent police line-up

Most Americans haven't sampled the thrill of being the subject of a police line-up, where the victim of a crime studies the faces of suspects from behind a one-way mirror. The proliferation of facial recognition technology changes all that. While the police need every advantage they can manage to stay ahead of evildoers, strong safeguards are necessary to protect individual privacy and prevent false accusations and arrests.

National Security Adviser Susan Rice (Associated Press) **FILE**

Susan Rice strikes again

Susan Rice, the most notorious liar in the employ of Barack Obama, is revealed as the queen of the unmasked ball. She abused her position as the national security adviser to the president to obtain the "masked" name of at least one member of the Trump transition team in the weeks between the election and the inauguration. What she did with the information is anybody's guess, and anybody could make a pretty good one.

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer of N.Y., speaks during an interview in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Schumer's chutzpah

Chuck Schumer is a New Yorker, so he knows about chutzpah. He schmears it liberally on his breakfast bagel. Chutzpah is the useful Yiddish for "shameless audacity," once defined by the young man who murdered his parents and begged the judge and jury to show "mercy for a poor orphan boy."

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, left, walks with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to a lunch with President Donald Trump and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the White House in Washington, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

No playing Russian roulette

On paper, NATO is an imposing institution --one of the world's oldest and largest collective defense alliances. On the ground, its strength hinges on a single question: Will its 28 signatory nations actually spend blood and treasure to honor their pledge of collective defense in time of war? No one will know until the dread moment of truth arrives. With Russia more menacing than ever, it's gut-check time for NATO.

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