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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer and President Timothy Sloan as he testifies before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Where disaster lurks online

The Democrats pretend to be the party that knows all about high tech. But some of them would get lost on a leisurely Sunday-afternoon drive through Silicon Valley. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, whom the Great Mentioner has suggested for consideration as the Democratic nominee for president, circa 2020, has inserted a couple of provisions into the National Defense Authorization Act which, if enacted, would put in jeopardy just about every Pentagon computer system and leave the country less safe, but — and here's why the Warren mischief is so attractive to Democrats — make the bureaucracy much bigger.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a keynote conversation at the 2017 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Hell on the (Canadian) border

Canada is experiencing a sharp surge of illegal aliens, and they're not just a few angry Hillary voters making good on their bluster about moving north if Donald Trump won the election.

A man is detained by Border Patrol officials after breaching border fencing separating San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in San Diego. The man, who said he was from Chiapas, Mexico, was detained by agents as they prepared for a news conference to announce that contractors have begun building eight prototypes of President Donald Trump's proposed border wall with Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Stalling the wall

There's something that doesn't love a wall, wrote the poet Robert Frost, and that something for the moment is comprised of Democrats. President Trump's long-promised wall along the U.S. border with Mexico is slowly rising from the desert floor and his noisy political opponents are mounting a campaign to bring it down.

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah waves to the media as he arrives to head the Cabinet session in Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' former official resident in Gaza City, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Hamdallah has held the first government meeting in the Gaza Strip as part of a major reconciliation effort to end the 10-year rift between Fatah and Hamas. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Less than meets a wary eye

The deal between Mahmoud Abbas' Palestinian Authority on the West Bank and Hamas in the old Gaza Strip is considerably less valuable than it looks. Although Mr. Abbas' West Bank authority will assume civilian responsibilities there, Hamas will remain in control of security, and will neither lay down its weapons nor dismantle its security forces and militias. Hamas has received arms from Iran in the past and now threatens the entire region.

In this Oct. 7, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before leaving the White House in Washington for a brief stop at Andrews Air Force Base in Md., on his way to Greensboro, N.C. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Nixing the Iran nuclear deal

You have to give a little to get a little. That's the art of the deal. But when Barack Obama bargained with Iran's mullahs over their nuclear program, he gave away the store — including the cash drawer — and only got a little time in return before the advent of the Islamic bomb. Buying peril on the lay-away plan does the world no favors. President Trump calls it "the worst deal ever negotiated," and he wants to alter it. To act in the interest of the United States, after all, is his sworn duty as president and commander in chief.

Richard Cohen of the Southern Poverty Law Center. **FILE**

Making money on hate

These are not happy times for the Southern Poverty Law Center, which doesn't have a lot to do with the South, poverty or the law, and it thrives far from the center of the political spectrum. The center is mostly a cash machine, and it has raised hundreds of millions of dollars, mostly from well-meaning but gullible liberals — "progressives" in the current argot — in the name of fighting injustice and hate. Lately it has been called out as a hate group itself.

From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen, sing together during a National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral, in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A mandate for religious freedom

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

Donald Trump's new guidelines for protecting religious faith restore justice

The Washington Times

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

Vice president Mike Pence takes the stage to deliver remarks before assisting volunteers working on the relief effort for the Puerto Rico victims of Hurricane Maria, at the Iglesia de Dios church in Kissimmee, Fla., Thursday, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (Joe Burbank /Orlando Sentinel via AP)

No snakes in the grass

Sexual harassment is tacky and vile, ranging from a wink and a nod (usually a misdemeanor) to brute force (always a felony), and such misbehavior has been with us since Adam and Eve ruined paradise when Eve had an affair with a snake -- a real one, not the snake in the grass that can bedevil mere friendships.

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The humiliation of the snobs

One rare nugget of good news from the roiling, boiling cauldron of controversy about everything is that there's a new recognition of the Constitution. Many Americans, ignorant of the how and why of the founding document, have learned, sometimes to their frustration, that it's relevant, after all.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, right, and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan shake hands at the conclusion of their joint press conference at the Saadabad Palace in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. With Turkey's president by his side, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani pledged Wednesday that they would ensure borders in the region remain unchanged after the recent Kurdish independence referendum in Iraq. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

The romantic lure of secession

Break-ups break hearts, but sometimes the thirst for freedom cannot be denied. When the desire to end a bad relationship involves the peoples of a nation, the process can become a bloody one. Americans don't have far to look to understand that. A century and a half after Appomattox the wounds of a civil war have not yet fully healed.

Former President Barack Obama waves to spectators before the first round of the Presidents Cup at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J., Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Abuse by the administrative state

The spirit of the Obama administration lives -- only Barack Obama is gone -- in the bureaucracies that imagine they were established to harass taxpayers. One of these is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or the CFPB, one of the toxic vegetables in Washington's alphabet soup. Protecting the bureau, as the bureau sees it, is Job 1.

Beep, beep

Islam, it now turns out, is more flexible than everyone thought it was. King Salman of Saudi Arabia signed a royal decree last week stipulating that allowing women to drive an automobile won't offend Allah, after all. The mutaween, the religious police assigned to promote virtue where they find it and eradicate vice anywhere, will soon inherit an easier work day.

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