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President Trump has arguably done more than his predecessors to get the border wall along the U.S. frontier with Mexico finally realized. Despite congressional promises, little construction progress has yet been made. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

A barrier to the wall

The U.S. government just dodged a headlong run into a wall. Democrats threatened to vote against an interim budget deal if President Trump includes a down payment on a wall on the southern border. It's a mark of the lengths politicians of the liberal persuasion will go to destroy the Trump presidency. National security is held hostage in a high-stakes game of chicken.

A local resident holds a sign as he listens to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speak at a rally for Omaha Democratic mayoral candidate Heath Mello, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Riding the tiger

"He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount," a Chinese proverb cautions the unwary. That's where the Democrats, flailing in a search for a way out of the wilderness, find themselves in their warm embrace of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

FILE -- In this Jan. 16, 2017 file photo, Richard Ratcliffe, husband of imprisoned charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, poses for the media during an Amnesty International led vigil outside the Iranian Embassy in London. The family of Zaghari-Ratcliffe who was detained in Iran while on a trip with her toddler daughter says all efforts to appeal her five-year prison sentence in court have failed. Ratcliffe, who works for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of the news agency, found out this weekend that her appeal to Iran's supreme court failed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

Addicted to uranium

When gentlemen compete, they honor the rules of the game and accept the referee's calls. But no one would mistake the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran for gentlemen, and their gamesmanship in pursuing nuclear weapons is deadly serious. As the mullahs make a bid for more uranium, They have been called out for cheating. The United States is obliged to withhold approval of a new supply of the radioactive material until the regime can prove it's not up to mischief. Anything else is simply tomfoolery.

Associated Press

Preserving voting rights in Maryland

Sometimes the best defense is a good offense, and this is often lost on conservatives. That might be about to change. In battles over protecting voting rights, conservatives are usually put on the defensive by lawyers of the litigious left as they seek sympathetic liberal judges to strike down common-sense ballot-integrity measures enacted by the states.

Associated Press

More reefer madness

Marijuana has gone mainstream, its reputation hardly recognizable from the 1930s when a popular movie called "Reefer Madness" depicted in melodramatic fashion the dangers of smoking cannabis.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan wears cufflinks depicting the Maryland state flag as he signs a bill during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, April 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Confusion in the marketplace

The Maryland legislature has just sent a bill to Gov. Larry Hogan that will, if he signs it, sow confusion in the state's generic drug marketplace and subject consumers to considerable harm. It's bad economics laced with a large dose of politics that begs him to pull out his veto pen and limber up his writing hand.

Dr. Jumana Nagarwala (henryford.com)

Genital mutilation takes a hit

A Michigan physician was charged this week with the ritual mutilation of the genitals of two sisters, one 6 and the other 7 years old, revealing a sordid -- and illegal -- practice in certain Muslim communities that has put up to 500,000 young American girls at risk of this barbaric mutilation.

Eddis Marie Loving, of East Chicago, Ind., holds a sign as supporters and residents of East Chicago, Ind., rally near a public-housing complex Wednesday, April 19, 2017, ahead of a visit by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt. Pruitt was scheduled to to tour the complex where roughly 1,000 people were ordered evacuated because of lead contamination. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

It's Earth Day, not Doomsday

Saturday marks the annual celebration of nature called Earth Day, now in its 47th year. It's further the day set aside for a new event, the March for Science. Which to support? Well, both. The environmentally conscious in the nation's capital can kill two birds with one stone (speaking figuratively, of course) and do both. By showing up on the National Mall, they can refresh their love for humanity's habitat and cheer as well for the scientific programs that guard against abusing the globe. But showing up in a "Make America Great Again" hat won't be wise. Someone burdened with an excess of tolerance might deck such a foolish celebrant with a picket sign. Saturday is not about making America great, but making America green.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders acknowledges the crowd following his speech at the Louisville Palace, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. Sanders told a boisterous crowd Tuesday night in Louisville that Trump has reneged on his promises to working-class voters. He said Democrats should reach out to disillusioned Trump supporters as the out-of-power party tries to recover from last year's election losses. (Sam Upshaw Jr./The Courier-Journal via AP)

Another 'moral victory' for the Democrats

Our earthquakes and landslides just ain't what they used to be. The Democrats, like all political parties on the outs with voters, are entitled to look for hope and solace where they can find it, but the pickings in special congressional elections are so far pretty skimpy.

Supporters of the 'no' vote, chant slogans during a protest against the referendum outcome, on the Aegean Sea city of Izmir, Turkey, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Turkey's main opposition party has filed a formal request seeking Sunday's referendum to be annulled because of voting irregularities. (AP Photo/Emre Tazegul)

Cooking Turkey's goose

Turkey has been bumping along on the ragged margins of democracy for years. With this week's slim approval of a governmental reform referendum, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has proclaimed that the nation can "change gears and continue along our course more quickly."

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May walks out of 10 Downing Street to speak to the media in London, Tuesday April 18, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May announced she will seek early election on June 8 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Theresa May's gamble

Theresa May showed herself Tuesday to be a bit of a gambler, but only a bit. Armed with public-opinion polls revealing an unusual opportunity to trade a sure thing for a better thing, she stunned Britain, surprised Europe and fascinated Washington by calling for new parliamentary elections on June 8.

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2016, file photo, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, right, holds a stack of papers as he meets with then President-elect Donald Trump at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. A federal judge has ordered Kansas' top elections official to turn over a proposed changes to federal voting rights laws that he took to a meeting with President Trump. After privately examining the documents, U.S. Magistrate James O'Hara ruled Monday, April 17, 2017, that parts of documents from Kobach are "unquestionably relevant" to a lawsuit challenging a state law requiring voters provide proof of their U.S. citizenship when registering. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Waiting for Trump tax relief

"Everything in moderation" can be sage advice, especially when it applies to government and gluttony. When the administrative state sticks to its proper limited role, costs are contained and taxes are bearable. But the bloated administrative state snacks on billions and feasts on trillions. As Americans hustle to file their last-minute tax returns for 2016, Donald Trump's promised relief is obviously too late to lessen the burden this tax season, which ends Tuesday. If help doesn't come soon, hope for an era of renewed prosperity will soon be but a fading memory.

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