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The Republicans couldn't even fire a blank

Marching the regiment up the hill, with every musket fully loaded, and then down again without firing a shot is no way to inspire an army. Paul Ryan's Republicans, who boasted for seven years that they couldn't wait to get their hands on the Democrats and Obamacare, promising to make quick work of repeal and replace, couldn't even get close enough to fire blanks.

President Donald Trump jokes as he sits in the drivers seat of an 18-wheeler as he meets with truckers and CEOs regarding healthcare on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

It's always Trump's fault

The mainstream media pile-on of the Department of Homeland Security for its directive banning laptops, tablets and other electronic devices on direct flights from cities in eight predominately Muslim countries to the United States follows a familiar pattern.

Plastic cups spell out Rockville Strong, at Rockville High School in Rockville, Maryland, on Thursday, March 23, 2017. The school has been thrust into the national immigration debate after a 14-year-old student said she was raped in a bathroom, allegedly by two classmates, including one who authorities said came to the U.S. illegally from Central America. (AP Photo/Brian Witte)

Reading, writing, and raping

Rape was once a capital crime almost everywhere. But the politically correct culture, with its gift for dumbing down everything, regards rape now not as a felony, but a misdemeanor, something like shoplifting.

Supervisor Hillary Ronen speaks at a rally outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. President Donald Trump moved aggressively to tighten the nation's immigration controls Wednesday, signing executive actions to jumpstart construction of his promised U.S.-Mexico border wall and cut federal grants for immigrant-protecting "sanctuary cities." (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Safe space for the law-abiding

News good and bad travels quickly. Donald Trump pledged to secure the southern border, and thousands of prospective illegal immigrants began reconsidering their travel plans. Even before President Trump has had time to roll up the welcome mat put out by his predecessor, the number of illegals crossing into the United States has fallen dramatically.

From left, House Budget Committee Chair Diane Black, R-Tenn., House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., the Budget Committee ranking member, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., the ranking member of Ways and Means, and Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., the ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, gather in the House Rules Committee as the panel shapes the final version of the Republican health care bill before it goes to the floor for debate and a vote, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, sits at top center. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Feeding the garbage can

The Senate did the right thing this month when it voted to discard the Obama administration rules that would have increased federal standards for the training of teachers in elementary and secondary schools.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch talks about playing basketball with former Supreme Court Justice Byron White as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

No time to go wobbly

Washington has a bad case of whiplash. Barack Obama spent eight years pushing the nation toward the radical transformation that he couldn't openly talk about. Now President Trump is attempting to stop that train in its tracks.

President Donald Trump pauses while speaking at the National Republican Congressional Committee March Dinner at the National Building Museum, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Trump legacy

Donald Trump's greatest legacy (it's not too soon to speculate) is likely to be the end of the dependency of the rest of the world on the United States. This peculiar relationship was itself a legacy of World War II. Europe had been decimated by an earlier world war inflicted on an earlier generation, and the moral bankruptcy that followed enabled the ascendancy of the Nazis and the destruction of the Jews in Europe.

This image released by Sesame Workshop shows Julia, a new autistic muppet character debuting on the 47th Season of "Sesame Street" on April 10, 2017, on both PBS and HBO. (Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop via AP)

Curing addiction to government art

Big Bird doesn't live at the Public Broadcasting System anymore, but some people have not got the word. Big Bird has moved uptown to new digs at Home Box Office, a subsidiary of Time Warner. They've even moved the street where Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch live. Sesame Street runs off Columbus Circle in Manhattan now.

Hospital workers walk by a journalist on a stakeout checking his mobile phone outside the forensic department of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, where the body of Kim Jong Nam, exiled half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Nam, has been kept, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 20, 2017. Malaysian police said Sunday that they are hunting for more North Korean suspects over the killing of Kim Jong Nam who was poisoned to death at Kuala Lumpur's airport on Feb. 13. (AP Photo/Daniel Chan)

Taming North Korea

If demography is destiny, in North Korea the guiding force is ancestry. Like his grandfather and father before him, Kim Jong-un suffers delusions of grandeur, surrounded only by frightened sycophants, coveting a place among the world's important nations. As Pyongyang edges closer to building a working nuclear missile capable of reaching the United States, Mr. Kim must get the right response to his vow to annihilate his enemies. Tough talk from the United States and its allies is only a stopgap. The solution, short of war, lies with China.

President Donald Trump talks to the press corps inside Air Force One at the Palm Beach International Airport, Sunday, March 19, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Trump is returning to Washington. Standing next to Trump  is New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Trump's left hand

Some of the Democrats trying to come to terms with their new home in the wilderness have chosen Ivanka, the president's accomplished daughter, as their "lifeline" to the past. They see her as the only vestige of light in an otherwise dark, alt-right Trump administration. The London Guardian says she's a "moral compass" for her father, who "might be able to rein in some of the more extreme policies of the administration."

The Pentagon pushed back against reports that an aggressive string of recent U.S. military sorties have killed hundreds of civilians in Iraq and Syria. Defense Secretary James Mattis reportedly has been weighing a loosening of restrictions on U.S. airstrikes that the Obama administration kept in place in war against the Islamic State in Iraq, current and former U.S. officials have said. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

A job for the mad dog

When James Mattis, the retired Marine general once called "Mad Dog Mattis" by his troops for his no-nonsense combat leadership, was named secretary of Defense many senior officers were encouraged to think that at last someone would put his foot down, hard, on the use of the military as a petri dish for the social experiments so beloved by Barack Obama and Ashton Carter.

President Donald Trump arrives for a St. Patrick's Day reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mr. Trump's travel ban

President Trump and the lower federal courts are playing a dangerous game of ping-pong, and the nation's security is paying for it. The president, who is responsible for the nation's safety, proposes and certain federal judges, who have no such responsibility dispose. The president proposes again, and again a judge or two dispose.

Issa Hayatou, right, speaks to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, left, at the opening of the general assembly of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Thursday, March 16, 2017. Issa Hayatou was voted out as president of the African soccer confederation on Thursday after 29 years in charge, losing to challenger Ahmad of Madagascar in a major shakeup for the sport on the continent. (AP Photo)

The hateful idea of hate crime

Three men were indicted this month in Washington for the fatal shooting of a 22-year-old transgendered woman, the robbing of a second transgendered woman and the assault on a third. A "hate crime" charge was added to the charges of conspiracy, robbery and first-degree murder, which could mean that the defendants, if convicted, could serve sentences half again as long as for "mere" murder.

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