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Chancellor Angela Merkel reads documents during an election campaign for the regional elections in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania , scheduled for Sept. 4,  in Neustrelitz, Germany. (Bernd Wuestneck/dpa via AP)

Headaches accumulate for Merkel

Resentment of open-door immigration is growing across the Western nations, and Hillary Clinton will get no tips, hints or reassurance from Angela Merkel. The German chancellor has unique immigration headaches, and they arrived through an open door much like the one that Barack Obama wants to leave as his legacy and that Hillary promises to keep if she returns to the White House, this time as the president.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton talks with media as she meets with law enforcement leaders at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

Hillary's tainted campaign

The right to vote is both a right and a privilege, bought by sacrifice to be enjoyed by every American citizen. But the outcome of the 2016 presidential election could be affected — either directly or indirectly — by those who are not citizens. Americans who think their homeland is slipping away from them can thank the liberal Democrats (and alas, there are few of any other kind left in the party) for taking it away from them. When donkeys kick up their hindquarters, they break everything in sight.

Vice President Joe Biden addresses a gathering during a campaign rally with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) ** FILE **

Joe Biden's no-gaffe gaffe

Agaffe, so a wise man once said, is what happens when a public official inadvertently tells the truth. The scribblers in Washington, collectively known as "the Gaffe Patrol," are fond of collecting gaffes, scolding the gaffes, and congratulating themselves for once more acting as the republic's faithful watchdogs. Arf, arf.

Family members gather for a road naming ceremony with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, centre, his son Hunter Biden, left, and his sister Valerie Biden Owens, right, joined by other family members during a ceremony to name a national road after his late son Joseph R. "Beau" Biden III, in the village of Sojevo, Kosovo, on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016.  President Joe Biden is the guest of honor during the street dedication ceremony naming the national road Joseph R. "Beau" Biden III.AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)

A mission to a mess

Vice President Joe Biden's visit to Turkey next week is likely to be critical, if not conclusive. Whether he can establish a new relationship with this important NATO ally, the ally with military resources exceeded in the alliance only by those of the United States, is crucial to just about everything in the Middle East.

Down the drain with Obamacare

Not for nothing is economics called "the dismal science," but more dispiriting still is President Obama's attempt to rewrite the principles of the science. The first principle is that the individual engages in economic activity to fulfill his needs, not those of someone else. Obamacare broke that rule by forcing Americans to subsidize the health costs of others, and it's Obamacare that's now going broke. Justice triumphs sometimes, after all. If supplicants come to Congress looking for a bailout, the only reasonable answer is no.

Donald Trump said that with interest rates so low, "this is the time to borrow" in order to pay for more than $500 billion in infrastructure he wants to build. (Associated Press)

Consensus in a bubble

Throwing rocks at the newspapers and television networks, however much many of them deserve to take a big one squarely on the snout, is a fool's game. Never pick an argument, as the saying goes, with a man who buys ink by the barrel.

FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama signs the "Every Student Succeeds Act," a major education law setting U.S. public schools on a new course of accountability, in Washington. The lazy days of summer are ending for millions of children as they grab their backpacks, pencils and notebooks and return to the classroom for a new school year. No more staying up late during the week. Farewell to sleeping in. And, hello homework!  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Breaks for the undeserving

President Obama wants to be every felon's best friend. Whether locked up at Guantanamo Bay or a federal penitentiary somewhere across the America, every prisoner can hope that he, too, will escape the Big House. Mercy and clemency is the hope of every prisoner, and some deserve it, but not everyone to whom the president shows such mercy is likely to walk straight on the narrow from now on. Americans who live in a gated community or a big house with a platoon of armed guards are at no risk to suffer the consequences. The rest of us are.

Hundreds of civilians flee villages outside Mosul the day after Iraqi Kurdish forces launch an operation east of Islamic State-held Mosul on Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. The Kurdish forces known as the Peshmerga say they have retaken 12 villages in the operation in an effort to encircle the city. (AP Photo/Susannah George)

ISIS comes closer

The adage "the best defense is a good offense" is an old one and usually an accurate one. It's frequently invoked by sportswriters on the football beat, but it can apply to warfare, too. President Obama, a keen sports fan, nevertheless failed to understand this and now America's enemies are coming. Whether they can be stopped before they inflict further serious damage is a question we'll all see answered.

FILE - In this July 22, 2016, file photo, a hostess prepares for the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting in Chengdu, in southwestern China's Sichuan province. China will propose a joint initiative to revive weak global growth at next month's meeting of leaders of Group of 20 major economies amid rising protectionist sentiment in the United States and Europe, officials said Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, Pool, File)

Bringing back 'stolen' jobs

The international economy is so interlocked that creating jobs in one national economy creates jobs in another national economy. That's why it's misleading to talk of the Chinese and other low-wage countries having "stolen" American jobs. It's not "just that simple."

FILE -- This undated image posted online on July. 28, 2016, by supporters of the Islamic State militant group on an anonymous photo sharing website, shows Syrian citizens gathered near burned cars after airstrikes hit Manbij, in Aleppo province, Syria. Syrian activists and state media said Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016, that at least 49 civilians, among them 5 children, have been killed on Saturday in Syria's contested Aleppo province as rebels and government forces traded indiscriminate fire across the region. Rebels and pro-government forces are battling for control of the northern metropolis, once Syria's largest city and its commercial capital. (Militant Photo via AP, File)

Extermination in Aleppo

An epic battle continues for control of Syria's largest city, once a rival of Cairo and Istanbul as a center of urban culture and civilization in the Middle East. Aleppo, once the Western terminus of the Silk Road from China, is swiftly becoming the latest symbol of man's inhumanity to man.

Extermination in Aleppo

The Washington Times

An epic battle continues for control of Syria's largest city, once a rival of Cairo and Istanbul as a center of urban culture and civilization in the Middle East. Aleppo, once the Western terminus of the Silk Road from China, is swiftly becoming the latest symbol of man's inhumanity to man.

In this Dec. 13, 2013 photo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie reacts to a question during a news conference in Trenton, N.J., A former aide to Christie texted to a colleague that the New Jersey governor "flat out lied" during the news conference about the George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal, according to a new court filing. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Nannies gone wild

"Multi-tasking" is the current fad word for "trying to do two things at once." Some folks are against it. New Jersey, which doesn't think Jersey guys are smart enough to pump gasoline into their own cars, now wants to make a misdemeanor of drinking coffee while driving.

Nannies gone wild

The Washington Times

''Multi-tasking" is the current fad word for "trying to do two things at once." Some folks are against it. New Jersey, which doesn't think Jersey guys are smart enough to pump gasoline into their own cars, now wants to make a misdemeanor of drinking coffee while driving.

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