Political Editorials - Washington Times

Editorials

Featured Articles





Related Articles

Insecurity by the Bay

The Washington Times

The wheels of justice turn slowly in some places, and in San Francisco, fortunately, they're grinding in reverse if only for the moment. Baghdad by the Bay, as a favorite columnist once called the city celebrated for gaiety and frivolity, is proud to be "a sanctuary city" to harbor selected criminal suspects. Now even in "Baghdad" some of the citizens are finally fed up with politicians who defy federal immigration law to enable the lawless and the hunted to hide.

Culture warriors can save U.S.

As President Obama's corrosive legacy continues to bulldoze the best interests of the American people, we are painfully reminded of just how insidious overwhelming government can be. It is not so different from the tyrannical government that inspired the American Revolution.

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 17, 2016, following a House Republican caucus meeting. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Puerto Rico debacle

House Speaker Paul Ryan, who needed a lift after losing his arm-wrestle with Donald Trump, is being celebrated for striking a deal with President Obama and the Democrats for a plan to rescue Puerto Rico. The House will vote soon. The Hill, a newspaper on Capitol Hill, touts the deal as Mr. Ryan's first major bipartisan "big win." But is it?

President Barack Obama pauses during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trouble with words

Men and women (and mostly men) have always had trouble with what to call each other. Juliet in her frustration at the prospect of separation from Romeo asked the question, what's in a name? "That which we call a rose," she observed, "by any other word would smell as sweet."

President Barack Obama looks to entrepreneurs on stage with him during a visit to the DreamPlex Coworking Space in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Secret deals, broken promises

Barack Obama is entitled to wonder why, after all he has done to keep their nuclear-weapons research intact and thriving, the mullahs in Iran are being so mean to him. Only the naive and foolish expect gratitude in politics, domestic or foreign, but still.

The HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, is displayed on a laptop screen. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Bilking with Obamacare

Obamacare has been unpopular from the time it became law. Now President Obama's health-care scam has gone rogue, and maybe illegal. That's the conclusion of analysts both inside and outside of the federal government. They say the Obama administration is diverting taxpayer funds to save the president's scheme from collapse, if only until after he leaves office.

The American dream. (Jonathon Gruenke/Daily Press via AP)

The shrinking American dream

The 21st century has not been kind to the American dream. The dream that brought millions of "the tired, the poor, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free" to America rests on the idea that each generation will have it better than the one before it.

A mural is seen at the site of Freddie Gray's arrest in the Sandtown neighborhood of Baltimore, Monday, May 23, 2016, after Officer Edward Nero, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Gray, was acquitted of all charges in his trial. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Justice and good sense in Baltimore

The policeman on trial for his role in the arrest of Freddie Gray in Baltimore was acquitted Monday and the city did not explode. Much of the credit for keeping the peace goes to the Gray family. Billy Murphy, the family lawyer, said after the verdict that "I don't think anybody should be upset with this verdict." He praised the judge, who like Freddie Gray, is black, for deciding on the facts and not the public pressure coming from both sides.

A new sticker designates a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale high school Tuesday, May 17, 2016, in Seattle. President Obama’s directive ordering schools to accommodate transgender students has been controversial in some places but since 2012 Seattle has mandated that transgender students be able to use of the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice. Nearly half of the district’s 15 high schools already have gender neutral bathrooms and one high school has had a transgender bathroom for 20 years. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Reflections in the urinal

"Bein' good isn't always easy," as an old folk song puts it, and begin' politically correct in the brave new America is extraordinarily difficult. Who can keep up with what's new in confusion and abuse?

In this Monday, Sept. 1, 2014 photo, a central Illinois corn farmer begins to harvest this years crops of corn in Pleasant Plains, Ill. Wet, cool conditions across much of Illinois have put farmers behind schedule in bringing their corn in from the fields, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

When corn rules the road

Washington overflows with bad ideas. The Environmental Protection Agency's ethanol mandate for truck and automobile fuel is a big one. Rather than think again unworkable rules, the EPA doubles down, or in this case doubles up, raising the bar for compliance ever higher. If cars would run best on ethanol, the federal government wouldn't have to force it on the American motorist.

Illustration on Obama's false Iran deal narrative by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Correcting the false White House Iran narrative

It can be no surprise how political debate on the West's policy toward Iran has intensified in the wake of the recent New York Times Magazine article revealing the deliberate deceptions carried out by the Obama administration to justify its nuclear negotiations and its broader policy of appeasement.

FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2014 file photo, New York Police Department officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference in New York. Boston police had promised to launch a pilot program to outfit officers with body cameras by April 2016, but now are saying it will be closer to June. It's superintendent is publicly doubting whether the cameras are needed at all, and Community meetings are being held to debate the matter. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The body-camera effect

Violent crime in America leaves a growing body count in its wake. Authorities disagree over whether the trend is simply statistical noise or a predictable result of relaxed policing in the wake of several explosive policing incidents.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign event Thursday, May 19, 2016, in Lawrenceville, N.J. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

The alternative to Hillary

Only a month ago (a millennium in the era of social media and the hundreds of Internet "news" sites) the Republican Party was just about ready for an autopsy. The Grand Old Party was dead, rotting from the headless top, and Donald Trump was about to be buried by Hillary Clinton, perhaps by 60 points. Woe was all.

© Copyright 2016 The Washington Times, LLC
3600 New York Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002

Switch to Desktop version