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Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

A North Korean defector holds a banner as police officers stand guard during a rally against South Korean government's policy against the North in front of the Government Complex in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, in an extraordinary and direct rebuke, called U.S. President Donald Trump "deranged" and said he will "pay dearly" for his threats, a possible indication of more powerful weapons tests on the horizon. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Donald Trump: Deliciously impolite

- The Washington Times

Politeness is so overrated. President Donald Trump's naysayers have come out in full force in recent days to blast his tough-talk speech to the United Nations as bombastic, and his Twitter firings at North Korea's Kim Jong Un as dangerous. But the truth is: Keeping the world powers on its collective toes is good for America.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar's western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world's most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to 'Make America Great Again'? That's a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We've heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it's hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia's efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life -- literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he's now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

A man walks past a TV screen showing U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the U.N. General Assembly, in Tokyo Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. Trump's threat before the world to obliterate North Korea left no doubt about his determination to stop the communist country's nuclear weapons buildup. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

When North Korea crosses the line

North Korea is too close to crossing the red line -- deploying nuclear missiles that can destroy a U.S. city -- and President Trump must take military action.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson's Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn't devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley's campus.

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year's presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump's favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

Illustration on changing bad influences on the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Finding use for a 'useless' U.N.

While campaigning for the presidency, Donald Trump more than once referred to the United Nations as a "useless" organization and "not a friend of democracy."

Illustration on President Trump's impending legal troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's tightening legal noose

The Donald Trump I know is a smart guy who often thinks a few steps ahead of those whose will he is trying to bend. But I lately wonder whether he grasps the gravity of the legal peril that is beginning to show up around him.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China's grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

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