Political Commentary - Washington Times

Commentary

Featured Articles

Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times




Related Articles

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start "winning" its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of '21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of '21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland's 'safe' environment

A rough translation of Maryland's state motto is "Strong Deeds, Gentle Words." In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats' blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday's confirmation hearing.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state's voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same "progressives" who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O'Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Illustration on allying with Russia to defeat ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cooling the anti-Russia hysteria

The start of House Intelligence Committee hearings on Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election revealed starkly different partisan agendas. Republicans want to know who criminally leaked classified information for political purposes, culminating in the political assassination of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. It is clear as a matter of established fact that such leaks took place.

Fighting crime with Jesus

- The Washington Times

A Chicago pastor, Jon Kelly, tired of seeing kids raised in crime and violence turn around and perpetuate the cycle with their own acts of criminality, has taken his prison past, his theology studies and a dose of good ol' boldness in God and headed to the streets -- taking over drug dealers' corners and setting up "Jesus Saves" shop. This is how it's done, folks.

Energy Industry Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Declaring energy independence

The United States is about to reach a major energy milestone. A new government report predicts that the nation is on track to become a net energy exporter within the decade.

Illustration on the sixty vote threshold rule in the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The pernicious no-debate filibuster

As habitually practiced since only the mid-1990s, by doing absolutely nothing, with almost no accountability accruing to them (using the "no-debate stealth filibuster"), the minority in the U.S. Senate can easily -- and nearly always -- either stop every legislative effort from even coming to the floor, or far more insidiously, sabotage it.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a Cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, March 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Political partisans within the ivy-covered halls

In her address last month at CPAC 2017, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos strongly criticized the nation's college campuses for trying to indoctrinate students. She claimed that the faculty -- "from adjunct professors to deans" -- are telling students "what to say, and more ominously, what to think. On many college campuses, if you voted for Donald Trump, you're a threat to the university community."

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. Spicer discussed healthcare, immigration, and other topics. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Fake legal standing

The Hawaii federal court's recent nationwide block of President Trump's new executive order on immigration is troubling. The court's decision turns on its head the important requirement that persons have legitimate "standing" to invoke the power of the federal courts.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump's pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can't do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president -- any American president -- needs to prioritize.

Unanswered Questions in the Mideast Conflicts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A slippery slope in Iraq and Syria

The good news is various forces are attacking ISIS (the Islamic State) and its control of territory is weakening. But as it does, historical adversaries are converging on the battlefield and American troops are standing between them in ever-increasing numbers. What began as limited airstrikes has become an American ground presence. Changes begun in the previous administration continue in the current one.

File - This Monday, Dec. 21, 2015 file photograph provided by the Israeli Ministry of Defense shows a launch of David's Sling missile defense system. A senior Israeli air force official says a joint U.S.-Israeli missile interceptor will be operational soon, completing the country's multi-layer defense system. He said Monday that David's Sling, meant to counter medium-range missiles possessed by Iranian-backed Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, will be operational in early April. (Ministry of Defense via AP, File)

The Strategic Defense Initiative at 34

When a politician promises something that "holds the promise of changing the course of human history," we naturally assume it's typical overstatement. But when President Ronald Reagan said that on March 23, 1983, in reference to his Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), he was exactly right.

Innovate and Educate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Funding advanced research should be priority

There is a lot of talk and understandable handwringing about declining state revenues for higher education. The difficulty of finding funds for expansion, let alone maintenance, is often painful for college and university executives, as well as for many state leaders.

Obamacare Stain on the GOP Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Purity and politics

Readers of a certain age may recall ads for Ivory Soap, which claimed to be 99 and forty-four one-hundredths percent pure. If the soap could have reached 100 percent purity, the company would likely have made the claim.

President Donald Trump points as he speaks during a rally at the Kentucky Exposition Center, Monday, March 20, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Immigration Googlespeak

In the face of intense criticism of his initial executive orders restricting travel and immigration to the United States President Trump didn't back down and didn't double down. He and his administration calmly and methodically revised and then reissued them. That's the way things are done in the business world, or at least should be.

Illustration on Federal subsidies for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

Testing for turncoats

Do you think the federal government spends too much? Taxes too much? And should reduce the deficit? Most Americans agree except when it comes to specific spending programs they like. The people "hire" members of Congress to make these difficult choices. Much of what the federal government does is not authorized by the Constitution or justified by proper cost-benefit analysis, so is without merit.

James Comey    Associated Press photo

James Comey's disappointing tap dance

- The Washington Times

James Comey, the director of the FBI, continues to act like a jerk for every season. The man who first tried to save Hillary Clinton's campaign, and then tried to wreck it at the eleventh hour, reprised his familiar tap dance Monday with Congress. It's getting stale.

© Copyright 2017 The Washington Times, LLC
3600 New York Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002

Switch to Desktop version