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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman    Associated Press photo

The Iran dilemma of the Saudi crown prince

The starting point for any policy that the new crown prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman, adopts toward the Islamic Republic of Iran is to understand two basic facts.

Illustration on the president's struggles with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his Justice Department by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An unnecessary clash between Trump and Sessions

During the past two weeks, President Trump has made no secret of his unhappiness at the management of the Department of Justice (DOJ) under Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Actually, Mr. Trump seems most agitated at the growing parts of the Justice Department that are not under Mr. Sessions' management.

A grunt's eye view of the Vietnam War

During the Paris Peace talks in the early 1970s, American Col. Harry Summers was talking to his North Vietnamese counterpart during a break. Summers reportedly told the Vietnamese that we had won every battle in the war. The Vietnamese replied, "That is true, but it is also irrelevant." It is not irrelevant to the surviving veterans who fought those battles or to the families of Americans who did not return.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, left, joined by Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, speaks to media aboard Air Force One, Monday, July 24, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to the 2017 National Scout Jamboree in Glen Jean, W.Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

'Conform or else': Democrats bully conservative women, minorities

On Monday, the Democrats were really excited about their new slogan, "A Better Deal: Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Wages." Widely ridiculed for being idiotic, here's a slogan they could have chosen, which is much more honest about the current liberal agenda: "A Bully's Deal: If You Ever Think For Yourself and Don't Conform, We'll Ruin Your Life."

Illustration on the dangerous precedent of the Charlie Gard case by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The lesson from poor little Charlie Gard

The sad news broke Monday that Charlie Gard's parents have given up the fight to save their 11-month-old baby's life. "The window of opportunity has been lost," due to time wasted in the parents' legal battles to save the child's life. "It's too late for Charlie," family attorney Grant Armstrong said. "The damage has been done."

Illustration on the end of al Jazeera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Does Al Jazeera deserve to die?

The Gulf Cooperation Council comprises six nations, all of them Arab, Muslim, ruled by royals, and fabulously wealthy thanks to vast reserves of petroleum. With so much in common, you might expect they'd be best friends forever. In recent weeks, however, the emir of Qatar, Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, has been the odd monarch out.

Obama Plan to Usurp the Senate's Legislative Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's Paris climate scheme revelation

The New York Times on Aug. 24, 2014, broke a major news story: "Obama pushing Climate Accord in Lieu of Treaty." It's a clumsy headline -- no one dared claim the Kyoto Protocol was anything other than a treaty requiring Senate ratification, and even the Grey Lady calls it the "Kyoto Accord."

Illustration on the carelessness of the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A culture of carelessness and secrecy at the IRS

The IRS systematically loses and destroys important federal records. Even if you request a file from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) under the Freedom of Information Act, there's no guarantee the agency will make a serious attempt to find your documents.

Russian Insecurity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the "Long Telegram" explains Putin's Russia

Russian experts, politicians and television's talking heads are constantly wondering whether Vladimir Putin's Russia is trying to reconstruct the old Soviet Union with its extended empire and aspirations, asking why else the country that gave up communism would invade Ukraine, threaten the Baltic states, interfere in Syria and even try to sabotage an American election.

In this July 17, 2016, file photo, then-Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort talks to reporters on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Robert Mueller team shows history of crossing ethical lines

- The Washington Times

President Trump's advisers and defenders in trying to undermine former FBI Director Robert Mueller's investigation of the Trump campaign's alleged pre-election "collusion" with Vladimir Putin's Russia are pointing out that Mr. Mueller and another former FBI director, James Comey, are longtime buddies.

Rob Goldstone About to Get Busted Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who is colluding with whom?

In the Russia-Trump imbroglio let us be clear. We are now months into it. A dozen or so culprits have been fingered, some being actually quite amusing. You will be seeing more of the fat British music promoter, Rob Goldstone, who has been photographed wearing a baseball hat emblazoned with a word denoting a type of female anatomy on it.

President Donald Trump pauses during a joint news conference with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Thursday, July 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump's right: It's a sewer, not a swamp

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump tweeted in the lead-up to Jared Kushner's widely waited for Senate-Russia testimony that it's not a swamp he's trying to drain. It's a sewer. And yes indeed, that description is much more apt.

Illustration on government run Health Care by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fake 'health care' debate

Confucius, who lived so long ago that famine, not obesity, menaced public health, supposedly observed that "the first step to wisdom is to call things by their proper name." If so, then angry congressional town hall meetings and serial legislative impasses are not really about health care, let alone reform.

FILE - IN this Dec. 2, 2009, file photo, the Total Port Arthur refinery is shown in Port Arthur, Texas. Federal lawsuits against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were filed claiming the agency has failed to correct Texas air pollution control permits with loopholes that make state enforcement rare. The suits filed Thursday, July 20, 2017, by the nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Integrity Project, target permits for the largest integrated petrochemical factory in the U.S., three refineries near the Houston Ship Channel including the largest petroleum refinery in the U.S. and a coal-fired power plant east of Dallas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Peddlers of junk science

For America's 207 million coffee drinkers, this month's "latest study" brought a venti-sized serving of good news: A healthy dose of coffee leads to a longer life.

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y. and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. lead Congressional Democrats to a news conference to unveil their new agenda, Monday, July 24, 2017, in Berryville, Va. House and Senate Democrats are offering a retooled message and populist agenda, promising to working Americans "someone has your back."  (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Americans: Optimistic no more?

"The present is getting better. The future, not at all." So begins a recent New York Times article about a Pew study that shows the public adopting a rather dim outlook. "Even as more Americans say the economy is improving, a clear majority remain fearful about their children's financial prospects," it continues.

Sudan Corruption Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A necessary delay for easing of Sudan sanctions

The announcement last week by the Trump administration that it is delaying the Obama administration's order to ease sanctions on Sudan was a welcome decision. The three-month delay is not long enough to give the Sudanese the impression that we are not serious about this matter, but will be long enough to complete the needed and ongoing review of that government's adherence to the requirements of sanctions-easing.

Illustration on crony capitalism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Crony capitalism against the real thing

For the past decade, a strange migration of a couple of thousand people from all over the world to Las Vegas takes place -- in the middle of July. They come -- at least most -- not to gamble and certainly not for the weather where the normal daytime temperature is a 100-plus degrees, but to participate in an event called FreedomFest.

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