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Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times




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Trump's Message for Our Allies Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The message for America's allies

President Trump got elected by railing against what liberal elites won't admit. The institutions that provided the foundation for post-World War II U.S international security and economic policy -- NATO, alliances with Pacific states and the WTO — have grown decadent.

Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the 2017 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference held at the Verizon Center in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Nikki Haley's full-bird flip to the U.N.

- The Washington Times

Oh, Nikki Haley. What a gem you've become. The South Carolina flag-flap is forgiven -- so, too, the endorsement of Marco Rubio for president. Kicking it hard to the United Nations has lit up her political star once again.

In this Sept. 27, 2009 photo, skulls and bones from some of the estimated 10,000 Tutsis killed in a two-day massacre at Nyamata church during the 1994 genocide, are displayed in a crypt behind the church, now a memorial to the genocide, in the town of Nyamata, Rwanda.           Associated Press photo

Why Trump's first overseas trip should include Africa

As the first African president to address Washington's largest annual gathering of pro-Israel activists, Rwandan leader Paul Kagame underscored a key reason for his country's natural kinship with the Jewish state: As two peoples who survived brutal extermination campaigns, they know the real-world consequences of inaction in the face of hate.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley talks with new mothers while launching a statewide Baby Box Program to help improve family healthcare outcomes and reduce Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome (SUIDS) Wednesday, March 29, 2017, at the Capitol in Montgomery, Ala. (Julie Bennett /AL.com via AP)

Health care as a right, or a good

The political fiasco that unfolded last week as President Trump and the Republican House leadership failed to pass legislation repealing the Affordable Care Act, commonly called Obamacare, is attributable as much to the failure of politics as it is to the failure of politicians to understand the constitutional role of the federal government.

Trashing the Filibuster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redeeming the filibuster

The Senate filibuster should be placed on the Endangered Species List. It is indeed endangered, and when it goes, an important element of our governmental system will go with it. Gone will be the Senate's role as the country's most deliberative governmental entity, where consensus reigns and the passions of the moment are subdued by calm, measured consideration of all angles and facets of any issue. It also is where vital checks can be placed on any abuse of the minority by the majority.

The Capitol is illuminated by the rising sun in Washington, Wednesday, March 29, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The congressmen and the counselor

Tony Hall served in Congress for 24 years, representing Ohio's 3rd District. The Democrat left in 2002 to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture, appointed by President George W. Bush.

Illustration on the realities of gender difference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex, gender, confusion and distraction

Sex and gender are serious subjects, but academics, pundits and the pop media have so stretched their meanings to use as weapons of political persuasion that the words sometimes don't mean very much. Communication becomes confusion and distraction.

Illustration on the efficacy of volunteerism to the problem posed by DACA by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

An interesting way forward for the Dreamers

On May 20, 2003, my wife Marilyn and I attended a dinner at the Park Hyatt Hotel in downtown Washington, D.C. We were there to hear the guest speaker, President of the Philippines Gloria Arroyo.

Cyber Warfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Warfare goes digital in the 21st century

Russia's intelligence service hacks Democratic Party computer networks and puts out stolen emails in a bid to influence the 2016 election. China says it owns 90 percent of the South China Sea and begins building military bases under a vague historical claim to the strategic waterway. Iranian hackers break into American banks and a water control computer network at an upstate New York dam. Welcome to the new form of conflict in the 21st century: information warfare.

Illustration on the negatives of the Paris climate accords by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better climate sans Paris

It's time for the United States to pull out of the Paris climate agreement entirely. On Tuesday, President Trump signed an executive order that promoted American energy security by rolling back several overreaching Obama-era regulations that are central to the Paris climate pact.

Illustration on the dangers of "dawa," Islamist indoctrination by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting political Islam

It is important for the United States to tackle radical Islamist ideological indoctrination -- dawa -- before it takes root to the extent it has in Europe.

Davey Crockett Donation to Fire Victims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false compassion of liberalism

Last week on CNN I debated a liberal commentator who complained that the problem with the Trump budget blueprint is that it lacks "compassion" for the poor, children and the disabled. This woman went on to ask me how I could defend a budget that would cut Meals on Wheels, after-school programs, and special-ed funding, because without the federal dollars, these vital services would go away.

Illustration on Liberal attitudes toward the Judiciary branch by Alexandewr Hunter/The Washington Times

Higher than the high court

The trials of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch, before the Senate Judiciary Committee en route almost certainly to his place on the Supreme Court, reveal one of my favorite findings regarding modern politics, to wit: The Democrats are the extremists, the Republicans are mainstream. The Democrats are the ideologues; the Republicans base their policies and political judgments usually on philosophy.

Illustration on the ideology behind Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bloody day in London town

"The Kafir's Blood Is Halal For You, So Shed it." That's just one of the catchier headlines in a recent issue of Rumiyah, a slick online magazine published by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS and ISIL.

Neil Gorsuch, the scholar and the man

To hear others speak of 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge and Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, it is as if the phrase "scholar and gentleman" were coined to describe him.

Podesta Russian Ties Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats' double standard on 'ties' to Russia

- The Washington Times

Washington and the national media are all about double standards. It should come as no surprise to anyone that the sort of Russian "ties" used to condemn Republicans as possible agents of Moscow are dismissed as irrelevant when Democrats are revealed to have deeper, stronger and far more remunerative connections to Russian banks, oligarchs and institutions than any Republican currently being banished to the outer darkness by Democratic "progressives."

This Thursday, May 12, 2016, file photo, shows a sign outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Associated Press has determined that North Carolina's law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3 billion in lost business over a dozen years. That's despite Republican assurances that the "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Transgenderism's friendly neighborhood media

- The Washington Times

The Associated Press came out with a cost estimate of how North Carolina's so-dubbed "bathroom bill" -- you know, the one that makes clear that boys must stay in their own restrooms, and girls, likewise -- is going to cost the state $3.76 billion over the next dozen or years. What the estimate is based on is the hope and prayer that nobody asks questions. Because under scrutiny, the numbers pretty much crumble.

Tax Reform for Economic Growth Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thinking clearly about tax reform

President Trump has said he is going to move on to tax reform after the debacle with Obamacare repeal. Is there any reason that we can expect greater success with the tax reform effort? I argue no, unless the rules in the House and Senate are modified, and those in Congress, whose brains are connected enough to distinguish between tax rates and tax revenues, take control.

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