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Illustration on the thought of Michael Lind by Linus Garsys/The Washington Times

A new role for America



Intrusive Government Data Collection Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Supreme Court call on the third party doctrine


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Roman Bellis, 4, and his dad, Dana Bellis, Millersburg, Pa., wear "Best. Dad. Ever." and "Best. Kid. Ever." shirts at the 67th annual Father's Day Breakfast at Valley View Park in Valley View, Pa., Sunday, June 18, 2017. The breakfast is sponsored by the St. Andrew's United Methodist Church's men's Bible class. (Jacqueline Dormer/Republican-Herald via AP)

A fatherly manner

It's Father's Day, or the day after, depending on when you read this. Statistics about the decline of fatherhood are very sobering, but I'm not here to bring readers down or to make people feel bad if they did not have or don't have a happy family life.

Russia at a turning point

Much as I deplore the trend within the academy towards ever more micro-courses dealing with a subsection of a subject, when it comes to books honing in on such slices of history, I feel entirely differently. After all, is it too much to ask that if a college course does not quite leave students seeing life steadily and whole (in the words of Matthew Arnold), it should at least give them some context and not result in them not knowing, say, who came first, Jackson or Lincoln?

Joy Miller of Boulder, Colo., holds up a placard during a protest against the polices of President Donald Trump Saturday, June 3, 2017, in downtown Denver. More than 300 people were on hand for the anti-Trump rally, which featured speakers calling for resistance to the administration. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

A biblical truth about leftist evil

- The Washington Times

America, in case it's escaped your notice, has been mired in an atmosphere of political animosity and violence -- violence that finally led a crazed anti-President Donald Trumper to take up arms and shoot to kill at a Republican congressional baseball team practice in Alexandria, Virginia. It's the sort of

Illustration on stopping the rise of the national debt ceiling by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Congress must not raise the debt ceiling

Growing up in Eisenhower's America, my parents spent their summers preoccupied with beach vacations and baseball pennant races -- both a welcome relief from the tough tasks of earning a living and raising children. This summer we get to obsess about whether the federal government will run out of money.

Illustration on the Honeymooners by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Honoring dad on Father's Day

This will be the first Father's Day that I won't be able to talk to my dad by phone or in person. He died at the ripe old age of 94 back in February. Wish you could have known him.

FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III was named as special counsel to oversee the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. (AP file) ** FILE **

The lawyer finds a permanent client

- The Washington Times

Every lawyer has a bit of the ambulance-chaser lurking deep in his heart, and dreams of one day landing a permanent client. Even a lawyer as distinguished, as ethical, as high-minded, as above all reproach and as disdainful of personal glory and profit as a special prosecutor.

Paying politicians to run for office

When politicians face a problem, their first instinct is often to spend your tax dollars. Those who see our politics itself as a problem are no exception. Figures like Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Democrat, and former Vice President Joe Biden say politicians should receive public funds to run their campaigns.

Illustration on resisting being goaded into a like reaction to attacks on the GOP by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

After the attack in Alexandria

- The Washington Times

Conservatives will be tempted in the days ahead to blame the left's over the top anti-Republican, anti-Trump rhetoric for the shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and the others wounded in Alexandria on Wednesday. It will be tempting both because leftist leaders have thrown all decency aside as they vent against those with whom they disagree and because in the hours following the shootings Twitter was awash with messages emanating from the progressive fever swamps celebrating the shootings because Republicans "deserve" whatever they get.

FBI Evidence Response Team members mark evidence at the scene of a multiple shooting in Alexandria, Va., Wednesday, June 14, 2017, involving House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others during a congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

We don't need gun control -- we need Democrat control

- The Washington Times

Terry McAuliffe, Virginia's Democratic governor, suggested gun control was needed in the aftermath of a shooting that left Republican Rep. Steve Scalise injured. But given all the angry rhetoric and uprisings those on the left have fueled lately, it would seem guns aren't really the problem. Democrats are.

Illustrations on the implications of the religious Left's renewed participation in politics by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The religious left's second coming

The religious left feels left out. According to an article in The New York Times, liberal clergy feel excluded from the political arena and blame the religious right for occupying what they once believed was their exclusive territory. They are, according to the story's headline, "seeking to break right's grip on nation's moral agenda."

Obamacare Death Panel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving money but costing lives

Buried deep within Obamacare is a provision that takes away health care from you and your doctors, by taking away payment for critical health care that may be needed to save your life. It is called The Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB).

On Nov. 11, 1989, East German border guards are seen through a gap in the Berlin Wall after demonstrators pulled down a segment of the wall at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. Associated Press photo

When the Berlin Wall began to crack

Thirty years ago this week Ronald Reagan stood up on a podium in what was then West Berlin, framed by the Brandenburg Gate behind him. Through a thick sheet of bulletproof glass, he gazed at the ugly concrete symbol of the Cold War, the Berlin Wall, and addressed the most famous words of his presidency to Mikhail Gorbachev, the leader of the Soviet empire: "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall."

Illustration on the U.S. ambassador to the Holy See by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An able ambassador to the Holy See

America should welcome the nomination of Callista Gingrich as the 11th U.S. ambassador to the Holy See. Mrs. Gingrich brings the necessary skill sets to navigate the sometimes labyrinthine interface between politics and the Catholic Church.

Matching Government Tenants with Jobs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A path out of poverty

Government should be a means of empowerment, not dependency, as well as a safety net. As President Trump discusses building America's workforce, public housing has a role in that discussion. Those who receive housing assistance must have a path toward jobs, wealth creation and economic improvement. We must remove attitudes, regulations, policies and programs that reinforce dependence.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, FBI Director James Comey listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

How 'showboater' Comey screwed up

What gets James Comey in trouble is that he leaked official memos that were most probably classified. He should have turned them over to the FBI or somewhere else in the Justice Department and then simply kept his mouth shut. And if he didn't trust anybody at the department, he should have sent the memos on to the congressional intelligence committees (and thereby been protected as a whistleblower).

President Donald Trump walks to his vehicle after visiting MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, where House Majority Leader Steve Scalise of La. was taken after being shot in Alexandria, Va., during a Congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The consent of the governed

Last week, when former FBI Director James Comey gave his long-awaited public testimony about his apparently rough-and-tumble relationship with President Trump, he painted a bleak picture. The essence of Mr. Comey's testimony was that the president asked him to drop an investigation of retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn -- Mr. Trump's former national security adviser -- and then asked him to do so in return for keeping his job as FBI director and then fired him for not obeying his order.

President Donald Trump smiles as he walks with his daughter Ivanka Trump across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, before boarding Marine One helicopter for the trip to nearby Andrews Air Force Base. They are traveling to Milwaukee, to meet with people dealing with health care issues. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the liberal hate-fest

Almost six out of 10 American voters are angry and dissatisfied with how the media is covering politics, according to a new Quinnipiac poll. Someone has finally united us, and it's through rejection of the 24/7 media (read liberal) hate-fest of President Trump.

Illustration of James Comey by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

James Comey, the crack-up

I shall not beat around the bush. As readers of this column perhaps suspect, I have admired former FBI Director James Comey for most of his public career, beginning in 2013. That he is a friend of former FBI Director Robert Mueller makes me admire him even more. Mr. Mueller is a man of integrity and discretion. Mr. Mueller would not befriend a man of dubious character.

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