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North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare


Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations


Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes



Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

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Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a vociferous opponent of the House Republican healthcare reform plan, referring to it as "Obamacare light," discusses the bill before a TV interview on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March, 15, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Civil asset forfeiture reform rears again -- thank goodness

- The Washington Times

Sen. Rand Paul and Rep. Tim Walberg, both Republicans, have re-introduced one of the most important pieces of legislation to come forward in decades that will secure the rights of Americans to be safe in their possessions and properties -- a rollback to civil asset forfeiture laws. Speedy passage is needed.

Trump Claims of Eavesdropping of His Campaign Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tweets and trials

Two of the government's highest ranking intelligence officials will go before a House committee next week to testify about President Trump's bombastic claim that his predecessor "tapped" his phones during the 2016 election.

Brazilian transgender model Valentina Sampaio wears a creation from the Amir Slama collection during Sao Paulo Fashion Week in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Transgendered child abuse

- The Washington Times

Last year, NBC News did a two-part series dubbed "transgender kids," that featured "the stories of 5-year-old Jacob Lemay and 8-year-old Malisa Phillips, two children transitioning to live as their authentic selves."

Lying Congress and the lying anti-repealers

- The Washington Times

Congress isn't going to repeal Obamacare. That whole Republican-driven mantra that's been making the media wave since 2010 -- the one that blasted Barack Obama as a socialist for signing government health care into law and that vowed a concerted fight for repeal? Bunk. Bull. Boldface lie.

Trump Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seizing a historic opportunity

President Trump presents his first budget to Congress on Thursday. It is, as The Washington Post points out, "historic" because if adopted, it would be the biggest contraction in the federal government since the end of World War II. Predictably, a Post story focuses on the number of federal workers it estimates could lose their jobs, rather than on whether those jobs and the programs associated with them are necessary.

Illustration on an American/Saudi Arabian alliance against Iranian hegemony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The resetting of U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman arrived in Washington this week to meet with President Trump and his team and to reset the U.S.-Saudi relationship, which hit an all-time low during the Obama administration.

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the Capitol in Phoenix Wednesday, March 15, 2017. O'Connor, who served in the Arizona state Senate as a member and majority leader from 1969 until she because a state court judge in 1973, was honored for her work promoting civics education. (AP Photo/Bob Christie)

Madison's principles on trial

James Madison, the author of the Bill of Rights, once said that "[g]overnment is instituted to protect property of every sort. This being the end of government, that alone is a just government which impartially secures to every man whatever is his own."

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The scorning of Moscow

A fog has descended on American political life, and it is rather hard for the average citizen to understand what is going on. The mainstream media are daily clamoring for more heads to roll in the administration and for independent investigations to be launched amid allegations of collusion between Donald Trump's campaign team and the Kremlin, for which the hacking of the Democratic National Convention server is highlighted as one of the presumed "smoking guns."

Illustration on campus culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the violent campus reflects a sordid culture

Middlebury College, a symbol of violent rioting in the name of tolerance, is easy to scorn and disdain. Nice boys and girls, sons and daughters of nice moms and dads, get caught acting out on intolerant impulses, and a "disturbance" sends a professor to the hospital. (At Ole Miss this would be called a "riot.")

White House Press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Send in the bullies

Watching White House press secretary Sean Spicer get verbally attacked at an Apple store by an unhinged activist was bizarre, but not entirely surprising as the left continues its meltdown over being rejected by the American people.

Old Glory Gun Rights Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Second Amendment as an individual right

Since San Bernardino, Sandy Hook, Columbine et al., the "progressives," the media and their acolytes have beaten their chests calling for even stricter gun restrictions, although the most restrictive states and cities that have the highest crime. They insist that the Second Amendment does not apply to individuals, but only to the National Guard, even though the modern Guard did not come into existence until the Dick Act of 1903.

Illustration on dystopian Pakistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What went wrong in Pakistan

Pakistan was meant to be a model, an example for other nations to emulate. It was founded after World War II, as the sun was setting on the British Empire and India was preparing for independence. India's Muslims, though glad to see the end of the Raj, were apprehensive about becoming a minority in a Hindu-majority land.

The Burnie Thompson Show Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A livestreaming unsung hero

When Burnie Thompson sat down with CNN Politics just before the 2012 elections, the cable news channel's host prefaced her first question by saying that she knew she was about to get a "snarky response."

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