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Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times




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Ruth Bader Ginsberg (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump and his flexible mind

- The Washington Times

If chaos is the sign of growth -- and sometimes that's a fair description of progress -- Donald Trump is on course to build an administration that can survive the fits, starts and mistakes of a drawn-out opening night.

Illustration on the work of Fred Kelly Grant by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unsung hero of rural America

While President Trump and Congress tackle federal regulations and the agencies that promulgate them, Fred Kelly Grant is quietly doing the same -- and succeeding -- with the most powerful weapon you've likely never heard of.

Trump's not so great deal with China

President Trump's recent summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping was only modestly successful. The hard reality is that on both security and economic issues, the United States and China are rivals -- not partners -- and much tougher days lie ahead.

President Trump now is convinced that the Export-Import Bank's corporate welfare produces jobs. He said he would nominate people to fill its vacant board seats. (Associated Press)

Doing the policy zigzag

It's not wrong for a president to change his mind as circumstances warrant, but Donald Trump is setting a record for ditching major positions he staked out in his 2016 campaign.

Detail of 'The Statue of Brothers' at The War Memorial of Koea in Seoul. Photo illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Countdown to one Korea

That drumbeat you hear is Korea marching toward unification. No gunshots. No missile launches. No tanks rumbling over the 38th parallel as in June 1950.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Twitter users are poking fun at United's tactics in having a man removed from an overbooked Chicago to Louisville flight on April 9, 2017.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) **FILE**

United Airlines and the golden age of airline deregulation

- The Washington Times

Blame Islamist terrorists and, yes, government airline deregulation for United Airlines' thuggish and bloody assault on a passenger on April 10. (Let the record show that for a decade I editorialized for deregulation and still think, within rational limits - I want a Food and Drug Administration -- the freer the markets the better for consumers and society in general.)

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to moderator Greta Van Susteren at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, April 12, 2017, during "The President and the Press: The First Amendment in the First 100 Days" forum. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sean Spicer's humble apology a sign of good governance

- The Washington Times

The left is going batty over Sean Spicer's Hitler mishap, mocking and scoffing the White House press secretary for mistakenly stating the former Nazi leader "didn't even sink to using chemical weapons" against citizens or using "gas on his own people" the way Syria's President Bashar Assad did. But Spicer's humble rebound is commendable.

Higher Education Commissioner Joseph Rallo, center, answers questions from House budget committee members while Board of Regents Chairman Richard Lipsey, right, listens, on Wednesday, April 12, 2017, in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

The GOP's best choice for education reform

Republicans in control in Washington have to decide whether to exert themselves on a range of issues to improve the economic and social conditions for millions of Americans or merely tinker at the margins with small-potato approaches.

Perils of the Rules of Engagement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When breaking the rules of engagement is right

Donald Trump and James Mattis came to office vowing to "win" America's wars again. But unless they change our politically correct military culture, it is certain America won't.

Executing the Guily and the Innocent Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Executing the guilty and innocent

Nearly three dozen men sit on death row in Arkansas, where capital punishment has been suspended since 2005. Unless clemency is granted, seven of them -- an eighth man was granted a temporary reprieve -- will be given lethal injections all within a 10-day period, between April 17 and 27.

Illustration on the pregnancy problem in the U.S. Navy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Love Boats sail again

Women can do most things as well as men. Almost nobody any longer disputes that. Women can do some things better than men. Many women thought Donald Trump as president would be a disaster for the final female assault on the glass ceiling. It hasn't turned out quite that way, and women, such as Nikki Haley and Betsy DeVos, have been stars of his new administration.

Ownership of the AR-15 Rifle Included in the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the Second Amendment protects the AR-15

For decades the federal judiciary has been trying to interpret the Second Amendment out of the Constitution. It is, as Sanford Levinson has termed it, an "embarrassment" to an elite class of legal scholars that finds firearms to be unusual and repulsive objects. Now the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that the semi-automatic AR-15 rifle is not covered by the Second Amendment, despite that fact that is the most common rifle sold in the United States. This execrable decision is the latest outrage in a long series of disingenuous judicial contortions.

Illustration on tax time by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Tortuous tales of 1040 taxes

If you're about to spend some eight to 22 hours to prepare your federal income tax Form 1040 (that's the range the Internal Revenue Service and experts estimate) before the April 18 deadline, well, good luck. Remember what genius Albert Einstein said: "The hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax." And if you need more solace from the past to sustain you in the task, here's a smorgasbord of famous and not-so-famous insights.

Illustration on stopping anti-Semitism by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stopping anti-Semitic bigotry

Historically, Americans' response to hate speech has been more speech. The focus has been on defeating bigotry in the marketplace of ideas and to leave government out of the struggle. This model has guided the approaches of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and other human and civil rights nongovernmental organizations.

Illustration on President Trump's non-ideological motives for acting in Syria by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

A non-ideological president

It looks like former Obama administration National Security Adviser Susan Rice will get a reprieve. With all the hullabaloo from last week's military action by President Trump in Syria's -- do we call it Syria's civil war or a massacre? -- it now appears Ms. Rice's mishandling of surveillance is going to subside from the headlines temporarily. Well, her mishandling of surveillance on the Trump team can wait. What Mr. Trump did last week in public was historic. He changed his mind.

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