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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times


Social warriors, sometimes

- The Washington Times


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Unanswered Questions in the Mideast Conflicts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A slippery slope in Iraq and Syria

The good news is various forces are attacking ISIS (the Islamic State) and its control of territory is weakening. But as it does, historical adversaries are converging on the battlefield and American troops are standing between them in ever-increasing numbers. What began as limited airstrikes has become an American ground presence. Changes begun in the previous administration continue in the current one.

File - This Monday, Dec. 21, 2015 file photograph provided by the Israeli Ministry of Defense shows a launch of David's Sling missile defense system. A senior Israeli air force official says a joint U.S.-Israeli missile interceptor will be operational soon, completing the country's multi-layer defense system. He said Monday that David's Sling, meant to counter medium-range missiles possessed by Iranian-backed Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, will be operational in early April. (Ministry of Defense via AP, File)

The Strategic Defense Initiative at 34

When a politician promises something that "holds the promise of changing the course of human history," we naturally assume it's typical overstatement. But when President Ronald Reagan said that on March 23, 1983, in reference to his Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), he was exactly right.

Innovate and Educate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Funding advanced research should be priority

There is a lot of talk and understandable handwringing about declining state revenues for higher education. The difficulty of finding funds for expansion, let alone maintenance, is often painful for college and university executives, as well as for many state leaders.

Obamacare Stain on the GOP Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Purity and politics

Readers of a certain age may recall ads for Ivory Soap, which claimed to be 99 and forty-four one-hundredths percent pure. If the soap could have reached 100 percent purity, the company would likely have made the claim.

President Donald Trump points as he speaks during a rally at the Kentucky Exposition Center, Monday, March 20, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Immigration Googlespeak

In the face of intense criticism of his initial executive orders restricting travel and immigration to the United States President Trump didn't back down and didn't double down. He and his administration calmly and methodically revised and then reissued them. That's the way things are done in the business world, or at least should be.

Illustration on Federal subsidies for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

Testing for turncoats

Do you think the federal government spends too much? Taxes too much? And should reduce the deficit? Most Americans agree except when it comes to specific spending programs they like. The people "hire" members of Congress to make these difficult choices. Much of what the federal government does is not authorized by the Constitution or justified by proper cost-benefit analysis, so is without merit.

James Comey    Associated Press photo

James Comey's disappointing tap dance

- The Washington Times

James Comey, the director of the FBI, continues to act like a jerk for every season. The man who first tried to save Hillary Clinton's campaign, and then tried to wreck it at the eleventh hour, reprised his familiar tap dance Monday with Congress. It's getting stale.

Illustration on the subsidized nature of the American academy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why colleges lean left

Anti-right turbulence has again raised the question of why America's college campuses lean so left. The better question for those lamenting this lack of intellectual diversity is why its absence continues to surprise. It would be hard to find conditions more conducive to a leftward tilt than our campus Cominterns.

Illustration on PETA's euthanizing of animals by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making a pet project of hypocrisy

Environment maven Al Gore selling his cable network to fossil-fuel-funded al Jazeera. Leonardo DiCaprio traveling thousands of miles on fuel-gobbling yachts and private jets while bemoaning climate change. PETA killing animals.

Illustration on the Trump budget by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Striking budget gold

What hypocrites liberals and the media are. For weeks on end they've been beating up President Trump for not taking the initiative on the $10 trillion debt build-up under Barack Obama or the runaway entitlement programs that could bankrupt our nation.

Illustration on an equitable political solution for Cypress by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey's vision for Cyprus

The Eastern Mediterranean is currently fraught with security challenges. Failed states, mass migration and terrorism afflict the region. Amid this turmoil, however, a golden opportunity exists to resolve one issue that has eluded a lasting settlement for decades. I am referring to the island of Cyprus. My government's vision for its future involves transforming the island into a bastion of peace, stability, cooperation and economic prosperity.

San Francisco Withdraws from the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

San Francisco beyond sanctuary

For one big reason San Francisco stands out among the 500 cities that have declared themselves sanctuaries for illegal aliens. Others content themselves by refusing to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement agencies. About a month ago San Francisco took a big step farther by withdrawing its police from cooperation with the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a vociferous opponent of the House Republican healthcare reform plan, referring to it as "Obamacare light," discusses the bill before a TV interview on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March, 15, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Civil asset forfeiture reform rears again -- thank goodness

- The Washington Times

Sen. Rand Paul and Rep. Tim Walberg, both Republicans, have re-introduced one of the most important pieces of legislation to come forward in decades that will secure the rights of Americans to be safe in their possessions and properties -- a rollback to civil asset forfeiture laws. Speedy passage is needed.

Trump Claims of Eavesdropping of His Campaign Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tweets and trials

Two of the government's highest ranking intelligence officials will go before a House committee next week to testify about President Trump's bombastic claim that his predecessor "tapped" his phones during the 2016 election.

Brazilian transgender model Valentina Sampaio wears a creation from the Amir Slama collection during Sao Paulo Fashion Week in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Transgendered child abuse

- The Washington Times

Last year, NBC News did a two-part series dubbed "transgender kids," that featured "the stories of 5-year-old Jacob Lemay and 8-year-old Malisa Phillips, two children transitioning to live as their authentic selves."

Lying Congress and the lying anti-repealers

- The Washington Times

Congress isn't going to repeal Obamacare. That whole Republican-driven mantra that's been making the media wave since 2010 -- the one that blasted Barack Obama as a socialist for signing government health care into law and that vowed a concerted fight for repeal? Bunk. Bull. Boldface lie.

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