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Illustration on the virtues of Kurdish independence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for Kurdish independence

On Sept. 25, Kurdistan will hold a referendum for independence. For a number of reasons, the United States should welcome this development and support the referendum.

Illustration on the history of the Department of Justice by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A tortuous start for Justice

If you think the Department of Justice is grabbing the headlines these days, on June 22, 1870, the news was even bigger. Congress seemingly remedied the federal government's legal shortcomings that day when it created the department.

In this image from Senate Television video, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses as he speaks Wednesday, June 14, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington, about the shooting at the Republican congressional baseball practice. In remarks made on June 22, Mr. Sanders told an audience that the U.S. is headed in an authoritarian direction under President Trump. (Senate Television via AP) **FILE**

Bern victims pile up in Democratic Party

- The Washington Times

If the anti-Trump fever the media keeps telling us all about cannot break through in Georgia's 6th District, then it truly is nothing but a phantom that exists nowhere but in the minds of media elites hysterically trying to will President Trump out of existence.

Illustration on responding to political rage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why so much rage?

That didn't take long. Less than 48 hours after the shooting rampage targeting Republican members of Congress and their staff on a baseball field in Alexandria, Va., followed by the picture of Republicans and Democrats kneeling in prayer at Nationals Park before their annual charity game, things returned to normal or abnormal.

Illustration on the faults of the NIEHS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chemical scaremongering

It's great news the Trump administration is starting to dismantle the junk science life-support system for government overregulation. Budget cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and reforms of science advisory panels at the Department of Interior and EPA, stir hope the agencies' longstanding reigns of terror via "science" may come to an end.

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2014, file photo, protesters participate in a rally on Chicago's south side as labor organizers escalate their campaign raise the minimum wage for employees to $15 an hour. Amid a national push by unions and worker advocates for a $15 minimum wage, Illinois Democrats hope to pass an ambitious hike during the spring legislative session, despite a warning from Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner that he opposes an increase of any kind. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Curtains for union coercion

In 1947 organized labor spent today's equivalent of $11 million opposing the Slave Labor Act. The act is better known today as Taft-Hartley. Despite the union's rant, it was designed to provide protection against abusive and often violent labor unions. Now on the 70th anniversary of that law, Congress is again poised to realign employment relationships free from coercive union pressures.

Illustration on the excessive costs of scientific research by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The high overhead of scientific research

Last year American taxpayers spent more than $42 billion for scientific research and education at universities and nonprofits across the country. Most of this investment contributed to American innovation, economic competitiveness and national security.

Illustration on elements of the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The American Dream, alive and well

Almost any time you see the phrase "the American Dream" these days, it seems to be in a negative context. The speaker is either assuring us that it's dead or that it can be salvaged only by a radical redefinition -- one that often contradicts the basic principles this country was founded on.

Illustration on the death of cash by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Breaking the monopoly on money

If mankind can figure out how to give everyone instant communication and all the world's knowledge via the smartphone, why are we not smart enough to figure out equally convenient, quick, low-cost and secure ways of paying for goods and services to everyone on the planet? Actually, we are.

Illustration on protecting the Baltic nations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NATO's Baltic challenge

President Trump was coy about his commitment to NATO's Article 5, which considers an attack on one member state is an attack on all. Most informed observers saw this as a bargaining ploy to get the attention of those member states who have not met the NATO defense spending target of 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP).

Illustration on the limited vision of politicized jurists on the question of nullification by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sanctuaries, for goose and gander, too

Since the beginning of this century, officials in states and localities controlled by the Democratic Party have increasingly disregarded laws, referenda and court decisions that affront their "progressive" sensibilities. That amounts to nullification, and it's hard for the federal government to impose its will on them. But now the progressives are going to learn that two can play at that game.

Defunding ARPAe Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The little agency that does

Cleaner, more secure, more affordable energy has been a national goal since America's founding. Whalers braved storms for it in the 1800s. Diplomats sought to secure supply lines for it more recently. In the last few years, a little-known federal agency with a long, complicated name has found a better way to get us closer to this elusive goal. The Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy (ARPA-E) does it by more effectively using the nation's most essential resource: ingenuity.

Illustration on vocational education for manufacture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of apprenticeship

- The Washington Times

My father was the president of the Rockford, Illinois Labor Council when I was a kid. He was a machinist at a time when Rockford and Cincinnati were the centers of the nation's machine tool industry. I remember that many of those working as machinists in Rockford back then were Hungarian refugees; skilled machinists who had fled after Soviet tanks had put down their attempt to topple their Communist government in 1956.

Illustration on Trump's potential impact on America's space program in the 21st century by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump, the new JFK in space

Bill Gates first noticed parallels between President John F. Kennedy and President-elect Donald Trump after speaking with the newly electd president: "But in the same way President Kennedy talked about the space mission and got the country behind that, there can be a very upbeat message that [Trump's] administration [is] going to organize things, get rid of regulatory barriers, and have American leadership through innovation."

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 19, 2017

Much fast growth right around the corner

Every day there are legions of new economists who dismiss the Donald Trump economic agenda and his forecast of 3 percent growth as a wild-eyed fantasy. The consensus is that the economy "can't possibly grow at 3 percent" says The Wall Street Journal. "Slow growth is the new norm, so get used to it," writes Rucir Sharma, Morgan Stanley, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley in Foreign Affairs magazine this month.

Roman Bellis, 4, and his dad, Dana Bellis, Millersburg, Pa., wear "Best. Dad. Ever." and "Best. Kid. Ever." shirts at the 67th annual Father's Day Breakfast at Valley View Park in Valley View, Pa., Sunday, June 18, 2017. The breakfast is sponsored by the St. Andrew's United Methodist Church's men's Bible class. (Jacqueline Dormer/Republican-Herald via AP)

A fatherly manner

It's Father's Day, or the day after, depending on when you read this. Statistics about the decline of fatherhood are very sobering, but I'm not here to bring readers down or to make people feel bad if they did not have or don't have a happy family life.

Russia at a turning point

Much as I deplore the trend within the academy towards ever more micro-courses dealing with a subsection of a subject, when it comes to books honing in on such slices of history, I feel entirely differently. After all, is it too much to ask that if a college course does not quite leave students seeing life steadily and whole (in the words of Matthew Arnold), it should at least give them some context and not result in them not knowing, say, who came first, Jackson or Lincoln?

Joy Miller of Boulder, Colo., holds up a placard during a protest against the polices of President Donald Trump Saturday, June 3, 2017, in downtown Denver. More than 300 people were on hand for the anti-Trump rally, which featured speakers calling for resistance to the administration. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

A biblical truth about leftist evil

- The Washington Times

America, in case it's escaped your notice, has been mired in an atmosphere of political animosity and violence -- violence that finally led a crazed anti-President Donald Trumper to take up arms and shoot to kill at a Republican congressional baseball team practice in Alexandria, Virginia. It's the sort of

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