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A man casts his vote at a polling place Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Provo, Utah. The winner of a three-way Republican primary, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Utah will become the favorite to win the November special election and fill the congressional seat recently vacated by Jason Chaffetz. Republicans outnumber Democrats five-to-one in Utah's 3rd Congressional District, which stretches from the Salt Lake City suburbs and several ski towns southeast to Provo and Utah coal country. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Resisting election integrity

The Election Integrity Commission will resume its work in September, now that the frivolous lawsuits against it are, one by one, being dismissed. The most recent case is in New Hampshire, where the American Civil Liberties Union has dropped a case over sharing publicly available voter information with the commission. The Granite State compromised and will comply. More states are beginning to come around.

Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat

After massive intelligence failures grossly underestimating North Korea's long-range missile capabilities, number of nuclear weapons, warhead miniaturization, and proximity to manufacturing a hydrogen bomb, the biggest North Korean threat to the United States remains unacknowledged.

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, "Sieg Heil!" What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites?

Benjamin Franklin     Associated Press image

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Juche' or consequences

- The Washington Times

Its ideological commitment to nuclear weapons means North Korea will never disarm peacefully

President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac to board Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is traveling back to Washington to sign an executive order at the White House and then later today travels to New York City. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump on Charlottesville: Danged if he does, danged if he doesn't

- The Washington Times

The immediate aftermath of the widely reported Charlottesville violence wasn't so much a media look at the issues, or the car-plowing suspect and victims, or even the demographics of the protesters -- that many came from out of state to stand strong against a small-town statue of Robert E. Lee -- as it was a cause to criticize President Donald Trump. But why all the angst against the president?

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Juche' or consequences

"Juche" -- the ideology of North Korea -- compels unquestioned obedience to the "supreme leader," who is exalted as the greatest source of political thought. It is enforced by fear and murder even among the elite and accounts for the Kim regime's paranoia and belligerence.

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the "one-drop rule," codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered "black." I wonder what we'd learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the "white nationalists" who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Benjamin Franklin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

- The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

Illustration on the challenge for Trump posed by North Korea by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Making the best of a bad nuclear hand

- The Washington Times

That so many of the nation's leading Democrats believe President Trump poses a greater threat to world peace than the mad dog leader of a nuclearized North Korea says more about them than either the president or Kim Jong-un.

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