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Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end




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Illustration on Trump's first 100 days by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

The president's ongoing challenges

The Trump administration is still in the throes of getting its foreign policy act together, expressing conflicting messages on Russia, Syria and other troubles abroad as it nears the 100th day of his presidency.

The Non-biodegradable Plastic Bottle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How an overreaching FTC attacks the environment

The proliferation of plastic on land and in our oceans -- plastic that can take hundreds of years to biodegrade -- is among the most serious environmental issues in the world. As a consumer, wouldn't you want to know about a plastic bottle that biodegraded in significantly less time?

Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

Illustration on a poll-driven view of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misleading polls and fake news

Newscasts continue to be filled with references to polling numbers that suggest President Trump and his policies are deeply unpopular, and that the American people overwhelmingly oppose the actions taken by America's 45th president during his first 100 days in office.

A spy in the right place at the right moment

Alexsi is a creation of and for the world of Joseph Stalin at its most terrifying. A practiced thief at 16 years old, he is captured by the communist NKVD, the law enforcement agency of the Soviet Union, and becomes a secret agent who is also a trained killer.

A woman collecting money for charity stands next to a quote written on an information board at Tower Hill underground train station, written in defiance of the previous day's attack in London, Thursday, in this March 23, 2017, file photo. On Wednesday, a man went on a deadly rampage, first driving a car into pedestrians then stabbing a police officer to death before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Charity keeps America free

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's senior advisers, deep in the weeds of tax reform, are reportedly looking at ways to save the middle class by placing more financial responsibilities on the shoulders of the wealthy -- and part of the plan being discussed is to limit the level of deductions charitable organizations can take. This is the wrong way to go.

Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn

The 20th century gave us a good many new literary genres. Modernism, Futurism, Dadaism. Later on there was Post-modernism, Structuralism, Deconstruction. And now there's a new literary genre: Redneck Porn.

Illustration on progressivism and government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Apocalyptic liberalism

Shortly after the 2008 election, President Obama's soon-to-be chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, infamously declared, "You never let a serious crisis go to waste."

Studio portrait of Bess Truman

First lady Melania's reclusive counterpart

First lady Melania Trump isn't alone in recent history to walk to a different social and activist beat in the nation's capital -- with her young son as her first priority. For a similar reason, Elizabeth Virginia Wallace Truman, better known as first lady Bess Truman, spent most of her White House years at home in Independence, Mo. To be sure, Bess never was content with the capital's attendant social activities, a feeling generated by her husband's first Washington service as a senator beginning in 1935.

Illustration on the March for Science by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Goose stepping for science

Imagine yourself in Moscow in 1950, taking part in a March for Science. Science in the Soviet Union had been suffering for many years under Trofim Lysenko, a third-rate biologist who promoted unsound agricultural policies.

North Korean school girls react upon seeing their photograph being taken as they walk along Mirae Scientists Street on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Tensions have spiked in recent weeks over North Korea's advancing nuclear technology and missile arsenal. But in Pyongyang, where war would mean untold horrors, few people seem to care much at all. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

What next with North Korea?

There was a moment at Press Secretary Sean Spicer's White House briefing Monday that was significant. Asked by a reporter about North Korea's missile launch last weekend, Mr. Spicer said the administration was aware of the launch and that "it failed." End of story. Next question, please.

Illustration on the Syrian conundrum by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

A sober look at the confusion in Assad's Syria

Was "Tomahawking" Syria for an alleged gas attack justifiable retribution, misfeasance, malfeasance or just a mistake? Was it a warning to China and North Korea as some have advanced? (This is the same line of thinking that bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki was really aimed cautioning the Soviet Union.) Why would China, the "celestial kingdom," powerful in her own right, pay attention; why would North Korea, in the hands of a madman, even care?

Fox News host Tucker Carlson interviews Drexel University professor George Ciccariello on March 30, 2017. (Fox News screenshot)

The rot of political correctness

In today's academy, truth is an invention. Expecting people to show up on time is racist. Censorship is good. Silencing opposing viewpoints imperative. Violence to enforce safety is natural.

Preserving employee wellness programs

From the start of the new Congress and new administration, reining in the regulatory state has been a leading priority -- and for good reason.

Fiscally Irresponsible in Puerto Rico Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping Puerto Rico honest

Congress wisely declined to bail out Puerto Rico when its leaders turned to Washington with hat in hand for help with its $70 billion debt. Instead, they created an oversight board to compel the island commonwealth to solve its self-inflicted fiscal mess.

Arming the Terrorists Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redefining the battle against terrorists

One of the hallmarks of the 2016 presidential campaign was Donald Trump's insistence on being honest about the threat of "radical Islamic terrorism." It's a phrase that President Obama refused to speak, preferring the euphemism "violent extremism." Hillary Clinton muttered the taboo expression half-heartedly only after Mr. Trump shamed her into it.

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