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North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare


Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations


Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes



Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

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California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California's mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump's presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration's top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump's meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

Illustration on the politically divided society by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Testing tolerance in the new pop culture

Pop culture once offered a needed respite from politics and the expression of personal opinion that becomes public invective. It was easy to escape into music and movies to pursue pleasure beyond the reach of "the real world."

Illustration on fiscal challenges to replacing Obamacare by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Repealing and replacing Obamacare made easy

The big insight on repealing and replacing Obamacare that too many Republicans are missing is that they have the opportunity to enact an Obamacare replacement plan that the overwhelming majority of Americans will find vastly preferable to Obamacare. That is because a strong majority of Americans agree with Republican free-market principles on health policy -- individual choice and market competition -- rather than the socialized medicine principles of so-called progressives -- collective social choice and centralized government regulation.

President Donald Trump looks at Education Secretary Betsy DeVos as he speaks during a meeting with parents and teachers, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A new direction on education

American public school students fall well behind students around the world in math and science proficiency. This is not debatable. According to the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, both cited in The New York Times in 2012, "Fourth- and eighth-grade students in the United States continue to lag behind students in several East Asian countries and some European nations in math and science, although American fourth-graders are closer to the top performers in reading."

CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CIA's affront to Trump

The CIA has denied a security clearance to Trump National Security Council (NSC) official Robin Townley without any allegation, much less evidence of disloyalty to the United States. Quite simply, it is because the CIA disapproves of Mr. Townley's attitude toward the agency, and this is unprecedented.

President Donald Trump waves to supporters on the steps of Air Force One as he arrives in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, Feb. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Will Comcast pick the next president?

As traditional media companies go, few are bigger and more influential than Comcast, the Philadelphia-based company that owns NBC, MSNBC, "Saturday Night Live," Universal Studios, Telemundo and cable television systems serving much of the United States. They're such a big player, in fact, that one might call them the dominant actor in media.

President Donald Trump calls out to the media after escorting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to his car to depart the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Intellectual honesty and political indifference

Over the past weekend, Trump administration officials offered harsh criticisms of the judicial interference with the enforcement of the president's immigration order. The Jan. 27 order suspended the immigration privileges of all refugees from Syria indefinitely and all immigrants from seven designated countries for 90 days.

ISIS Drone Attacks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS drones could target Europe

Killer drones guided by Islamic State terrorists have made their debut in Northern Iraq, prompting concern about a new terror weapon outside of Iraq.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, joined from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., takes questions from reporters about President Donald Trump's ousted national security adviser, Michael Flynn, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

An overlooked Republican empire

Donald Trump's narrow presidential win actually masks Republicans' growing national dominance. By focusing on the unconventional "who" and "how" of November's presidential race, we overlook the "what" and "why" lying beneath it. Below the presidential results rests progressively stronger Republican bases at the state and congressional levels.

Illustration on the Left's protests against Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The angry Loser Party

Proponents of the Women's March and other protests that have broken out in various city centers and airport terminals across the country often compare themselves to the Tea Party movement.

John C. Calhoun      From a photo by Matthew Brady

History's lessons unlearned

The alt-right has apparently lost another battle. The alt-right is the racially preoccupied group that champions the cause of white nationalism. This time it was Yale University that beat them back.

ADVANCE FOR USE SATURDAY, FEB. 18 - In this Feb. 7, 2017 photo, Logan Keck, 23, of Carlisle, holds her daughter, born Feb. 1, in the NICU unit at Holy Spirit-Geisinger in East Pennsboro Township, Pa. Keck was initially addicted to heroin and was in recovery for two years on methadone maintenance treatment when she found out she was pregnant. Keck's baby is now on morphine to help her through withdrawal. (Dan Gleiter/PennLive.com via AP)

The heartbeat of life

Finally. There's a bill that's captured the pulse of America: H.R. 490, the Heartbeat Bill.

Illustration on the EMP threat to the U.S. from North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

North Korea, the real threat

When might North Korean develop missiles capable of striking the United States? Today.

Shattered Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A new approach to U.S. Middle East strategy

The Trump administration has a unique opportunity to implement a new strategic policy to bring some semblance of stability to the current Middle East chaos. Under the pledge of putting "America first," our core national security interest in the region should include the following:

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