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North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare


Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations


Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes



Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Related Articles

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country's citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is "not compassion but recklessness."

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump's nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start "winning" its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of '21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of '21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland's 'safe' environment

A rough translation of Maryland's state motto is "Strong Deeds, Gentle Words." In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats' blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday's confirmation hearing.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state's voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same "progressives" who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O'Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Illustration on allying with Russia to defeat ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cooling the anti-Russia hysteria

The start of House Intelligence Committee hearings on Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election revealed starkly different partisan agendas. Republicans want to know who criminally leaked classified information for political purposes, culminating in the political assassination of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. It is clear as a matter of established fact that such leaks took place.

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