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Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump will gather with friends such as Sarah Palin and foes such as Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska this weekend at the Western Conservative Summit, a rehearsal of sorts for the party's national convention. (Associated Press)

No Trump trade retreat


Related Articles

Bringing the last act of the Civil War to life

How ironic that Lt. Col, Ralph Peters is concluding his epic Civil War series just as the prospects for a new one have never been greater. How tragic that ignorance of our greatest conflict has never been more profound, American history watered down while our campuses mandate self-criticism sessions to bemoan "white privilege."

Britain Rejects the Mandates of Brussels Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Take Back Control' won the historic day

- The Washington Times

Much has been written since the British voted to leave the European Union in part because so many believed that nation's voters would do as their establishment "betters" advised them without realizing that they were in fact ready to revolt against just such advice from people who believe they know best how others should live their lives.

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, left, welcomes the Albanian national soccer squad arriving in Tirana after failing to qualify to the next round at the EURO 2016 European Championship, Thursday, June 23, 2016.(AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)

An albatross in Albania?

In what is increasingly reminiscent of a John Le Carre novel, it seems that with each passing month there is a new chapter in a seemingly unending series of revelations of political intrigue and drama that are overwhelming the Republic of Albania.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Foreign Agent'

Brad Thor always packs into his thrillers more fast-paced action and particularly clever twists and turns of riveting suspense than just about anyone else writing in this genre. He's remarkably adept at keeping the reader on edge, wondering what could possibly come next and where it's all going to lead. You can't seem to turn the pages fast enough as you anxiously anticipate what you might discover at the ending.

Illustration on Donald Trump's "Christian" faith by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Campaign conversion?

Following a meeting between a group of evangelical leaders and Donald Trump last week, James Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family, was interviewed by Pennsylvania pastor Michael Anthony. Mr. Dobson told Mr. Anthony that Mr. Trump had recently come "to accept a relationship with Christ" and is now a "baby Christian."

Illustration on the effects of Hillary Clinton's undeclared war on Libya by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Illegal war and disguised truth

The 800-plus-page report of the House Select Committee on Benghazi was released earlier this week. It slams former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for her willful indifference to her obligation to repel military-style attacks on American interests and personnel at the U.S. consulate and a nearby CIA annex in Benghazi.

Illustration on Trump's "National Populist" campaign theme by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's pudding with a theme

Everyone's looking for what Winston Churchill called a pudding with a theme. How did the likes of Donald Trump make it to the forefront of American politics? How did the British break their strong link with the Europeans just across the channel? The common denominator, so we're told, is "revolution, down with the elites, power to the people."

Illustration on the need to identify radical Islamic's impact on homosexuality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama's duty after Orlando

Americans witnessed evil once again as a radical Islamic gunman -- who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State's caliph -- recently killed or wounded 102 people while they were enjoying "Latin Night" in a popular gay night club in Orlando. It was the deadliest attack on the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (LBGT) community in American history.

Brexit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Brexit's unsettling aftermath

The British independence referendum vote on June 23 was close and, surely we all will respect the will of the British people. The British prime minister, doing the honorable thing, resigned. Yet many British people are deeply ashamed of the result, owing to the barely unspoken rationale behind many votes: immigration (very un-British), and the likely consequences.

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