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Illustration on Ted Cruz' ploy to be "Reaganesque" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz's risky strategy

- The Washington Times

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz went "all in" Wednesday as he addressed the Republican Convention delegates in Cleveland, laid out his vision and pointedly ignored the opportunity to endorse the candidacy of Donald Trump. It was a risky move and may not work out as well for the ambitious Texan as he hopes.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Outfoxed: An Andy Carpenter Mystery'

"Your dog helped him escape" is a tempting kickoff for a thriller, especially when a fox terrier called Boomer is then accused of involvement in seven stabbings. It is less credible when Boomer turns out to be one of the animals under the protection of a lawyer called Andy Carpenter who cares more about canines than people.

Illustration on the dilemma of reform in a nation's leadership by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cause and effect

In 1926, speaking about the Declaration of Independence on its 150th anniversary, President Calvin Coolidge noted the unique philosophy behind the creation of the United States: "We cannot continue to enjoy the result, if we neglect and abandon the cause."

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Don't give up the ship'

The recent release of the investigative report on the "surrender" of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Illustration on the excess brought out in partisans at election time by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where fools rush in

Presidential campaigns bring out the best and the worst in the American partisan. The nominating conventions evoke exuberance and awe, excessive indulgence and sometimes even quiet dignity. Some speakers express humility and others parade a supercilious arrogance.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Brave New World: India, China and the United States'

On a crisp November morning last year, when Donald Trump's candidacy was little more than a cloud the size of a man's fist -- and the fist of a man with tiny hands, at that -- it occurred to me that if it ever did take off, a lot of its success would be due to his strongly protectionist stance on global trade.

Illustration on the relationship between honor killings an Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Honor killings' and Islamic terrorism

The world is in chaos, as Islamic violence is setting the tone with terrorism. Whether it be Orlando or Nice or the Bavarian train slasher, we're all told it was a "lone wolf" transformed into a monster by "radicalization," one of the left's favorite fabricated explanations.

Illustration on Republican support of Trump at the GOP convention by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republicans hold their course

- The Washington Times

The political disaster that many predicted last week would begin here in Cleveland with a divisive rules fight, and put a fractured and dysfunctional Republican Party on display for all to see, hasn't happened.

Shia, Sunni and Christian Iraqis pray together in Baghdad at the site of the July 6 truck bombing, the worst such attack since 2003. Associated Press photo

Iraqis united by atrocity

The hell of jihadi terrorism is burning in the hearts of Iraqi citizens even weeks after the worst-ever terror bombing in Baghdad on July 3. The death count is now well above 300, including 172 people whose corpses could only be identified by DNA tests.

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