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Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus




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A man walks past a TV screen showing U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the U.N. General Assembly, in Tokyo Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. Trump's threat before the world to obliterate North Korea left no doubt about his determination to stop the communist country's nuclear weapons buildup. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

When North Korea crosses the line

North Korea is too close to crossing the red line -- deploying nuclear missiles that can destroy a U.S. city -- and President Trump must take military action.

Illustration on changing bad influences on the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Finding use for a 'useless' U.N.

While campaigning for the presidency, Donald Trump more than once referred to the United Nations as a "useless" organization and "not a friend of democracy."

Illustration on President Trump's impending legal troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's tightening legal noose

The Donald Trump I know is a smart guy who often thinks a few steps ahead of those whose will he is trying to bend. But I lately wonder whether he grasps the gravity of the legal peril that is beginning to show up around him.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China's grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Hillary, here is what happened'

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons' 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a "meltdown." That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City's Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself.

Illustration on protectionism from Whirlpool by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the government plays referee in a competitive market

Whether intentional or not, a lot of President Trump's rhetoric on trade, both as a candidate and since, has rekindled in some pundits a teary-eyed nostalgia for protectionism. Odes to America's working class, who are seemingly cast aside in our nation's quest for cheaper, foreign-made products, have proliferated our airwaves and dominated political pages.

Food as a Weapon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to force regime change in North Korea

With the latest provocative firing by North Korea of an ICBM missile on Sept. 14, 2017 over the Japanese island of Hokkaido, it should be clear to any thinking individual that economic sanctions will not work. We have to face facts. North Korea is doing exactly what China and Russia want it to do.

Illustration on Iranian manipulation of the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new Persian empire

Eleven years ago, Henry Kissinger famously said that Iran's rulers must "decide whether they are representing a cause or a nation." If the latter, Iranian and American interests would be "compatible." As for the former: "If Tehran insists on combining the Persian imperial tradition with contemporary Islamic fervor, then a collision with America is unavoidable."

Stem Cell Research at the NIH Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seeking pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health

Dr. Francis Collins has not shown any pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in an interview, Dr. Collins' response to a congressional letter outlining pro-life members' concerns dripped with condescension, implying that the group of 41 congressmen understood neither the science nor the ethics of embryo and stem cell experiments. Dr. Collins owes us an apology. We know the science, use the scientifically accurate terms and know the ethical facts. Dr. Collins' positions at NIH have not been pro-life.

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body's New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on "management, security and development" that the entity was in dire need of reform. It's about time America snipped the U.N.'s wings.

In this June 7, 2013, photo, the placid meadows and hills of Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpburg, Md., are a contrast with the Civil War violence that once raged across this land. So consuming is the serenity at Antietam that it can seduce you into ignoring the story of the mayhem that unfolded here on Sept. 17, 1862. (AP Photo/Cal Woodward)

Salary suspicions

Let's face it. When it comes to historical markers and monuments, especially ones related to the Civil War, we hear more about destruction than dedication these days.

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