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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

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Social warriors, sometimes

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In this March 9, 2017, file photo, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Speaking about health care, Tuesday, March 14, 2017, Pelosi said the GOP measure is "very, very cruel. It must be stopped." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Pelosi's Twitter feed: It's still the repeal, stupid

- The Washington Times

Be careful what you ask for, as the saying goes. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi learned the hard way not to ask unfiltered, un-vetted constituents for their stories on Obamacare -- because what she heard back was hardly what she wanted.

FILE- In this Thursday, April 21, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama, with Saudi Arabia's King Salman, right, speaks after a Gulf Cooperation Council session at the Diriyah Palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. When President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Arabias Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the White House in the coming days, the new commander-in-chief will be laying the groundwork for his administrations relations with a Middle Eastern powerhouse and the worlds top oil exporter. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Sharia is not compatible in U.S. -- and here's why

- The Washington Times

Gotta love the Sharia. Our good friends in Saudi Arabia, the ones we dare not criticize for human rights issues because of strategic national security reasons, have launched a girls' council to help on the women's rights' public affairs front -- but unfortunately, it's Wahhabi style.

Nicole Perry joins other members of the transgender community who oppose Senate Bill 6 in a protest at the Texas Capitol as the Senate State Affairs Committee holds hearings on the bill, Tuesday, March 7, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The transgender "bathroom bill" would require people to use public bathrooms and restrooms that correspond with the sex on their birth certificate. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

'Toni the Tampon' -- speechless (almost)

- The Washington Times

Forget Dr. Seuss. The new Cat in the Hat on the block is "Toni the Tampon," a character devised by children's author Cass Clemmer to show kiddies 'round the nation that men, not just women, can menstruate.

Folders containing amendments to the GOP's "Obamacare" replacement bill are spread on a conference table on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 9, 2017, as members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee worked through the night. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Republicans gone drunk on health care power

- The Washington Times

Come on, Republicans. Have you gone commie? How else to explain this, from CNN: "While Republicans are pushing to drop the requirement of Obamacare that compels Americans to get insurance, another move in a separate bill could compel employees to participate in workplace wellness programs that collect their and their families' health and genetic data."

In this March 9, 2017, file photo, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wis. uses charts and graphs to make his case for the GOP's long-awaited plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Paul 'never defend Trump' Ryan exposed as two-faced

- The Washington Times

Wow -- this is like a "Girls Gone Wild" tape for the political world. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, the Republican public servant from Wisconsin, was captured on audio during the campaign season saying he'd never defend Donald Trump. Not then. Not ever.

Trump wiretap brouhaha raises Patriot vs. Patriot Act fight

- The Washington Times

The media's been filled with busy bees lately, painting President Donald Trump with the crazy stick and demanding he produce proof of Barack Obama's wiretap of Trump Tower -- but what has happened to America, land of the free, country of the Constitution, that wiretapping one's own citizens has become so believable?

Maintaining Accurate Voter Registration Records Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dirty work behind clean elections

As the White House prepares to set up a commission focused on potential voting irregularities, election officials from across the nation are busy conducting statutorily required voter list maintenance to ensure their rolls are ready ahead of the next vote. It's an important part of protecting the integrity of our nation's elections and saving vital taxpayer dollars.

Ambassador Sergey Kislyak (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Paranoia is what's for dinner in Washington

- The Washington Times

Paranoia is suddenly what's for dinner in Washington. The most fervent patriot can be a spy and never know it until someone posts a video of the high crime and misdemeanor of someone shaking a Russian hand.

The Great Pumpkin Rises Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

America's longest war

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to spend $1.4 billion of New York's resources to solve the persistent problem of poverty in central Brooklyn. If he wins legislative approval, Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, intends to spend the money on affordable housing, job training, anti-violence programs, recreational space, even obesity. Some cynics suggest the proposal is targeted at boosting Mr. Cuomo's presidential prospects in 2020, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and take his proposals seriously.

Illustration on the U.S. dealing with rogue nuclear powers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The risk of rogue nukes

Nuclear Russia and China are America's major geopolitical adversaries and national security risks. Nevertheless, for decades we have steadily improved relations with these countries and the risk of war with them is low. Our top national security risks are unpredictable rogue states that are developing missiles to carry out a nuclear attack on America. Our foreign policy and military strategy should adjust accordingly.

'Disunited we stumble'

President Trump's executive order on immigration has more than its fair share of critics. Among them, apparently, is someone at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The leaked report indicating that the children of immigrants raised in America radicalize at a higher rate than their parents do was plainly meant to undercut the president's order.

Workers man a call center in the southwestern U.S. (AP file photo)

'SEIU' is short for unemployment

I just came back from California, where starter wage mandates are wreaking havoc on the entry-level job market. I took a video of five kiosk ordering screens in a Taco Bell. You order, pay, pick up your food and a self-pour soda cup without ever having to talk to anyone.

Illustration on Hillary's history of actions in favor of Russia   The Washington Times

Gauging who would gain from Russian interference

Are you shocked that the Russians might have had an interest in who won the U.S. presidential election? Nations have always had an interest in who rules the nations they deal with -- both opponents and friends -- and that they often try to influence the outcomes should come as no surprise.

Safe Choice Logo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving EPA's Safer Choice

Anyone who's bought a washing machine knows Energy Star, the government label that denotes energy efficiency. People who buy cleaning products are increasingly aware of Safer Choice, the federal mark for items that are safer for the environment.

An American poet and his demons

Seldom if ever has there been such a neat match between author and subject as in this penetrating study of the American poet Robert Lowell (1917-1977). If other poets have struggled with mental illness, there can be few who have done so more fiercely and painfully than Lowell, nor perhaps any whose challenges in that arena are as bound up with his literary output.

Health care bill on life support

The Republican health-care bill, the American Health Care Act, faces opposition from not only the Democrats, but from the Republicans themselves. The interparty division can be seen on both ends of the spectrum, from the moderates to the ultra-conservative members of the party. The Republican leadership insists it has the support needed to get the bill to the president's desk even without a single vote from the Democrats. That road appears to have been harder than anticipated, as the hearings in the House burned the midnight oil to escape the various committees responsible for vetting the bill. It won't get any easier once the bill hits the Senate floor, either.

Planned Parenthood in it for cash

Many thanks to Kelly Riddell for her excellent Commentary piece, "Why Planned Parenthood must be defunded" (Web, March 9). Ms. Riddell points out that Planned Parenthood is an abortion organization that gets 86 percent of its non-government revenue from abortions. In fact, President Trump offered to continue the group's federal funding if it stopped doing abortions. It refused.

FILE- In this Sept. 17, 2015 file photo, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara speaks during a news conference in New York.  On Wednesday, March 8, 2017, two days before Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave dozens of the country's top federal prosecutors just hours to resign and clean out their desks, Sessions gave those political appointees a pep talk during a conference call. Bharara said on Saturday, March 11, 2017, that he was fired after refusing to resign. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Gamesmanship in Gotham

Preet Bharara is making a career of being one of 46 U.S. attorneys who was routinely asked to resign by President Trump, who, like his predecessors in the White House, wanted to install his own lawyers in these jobs. Mr. Bharara, who was appointed by Barack Obama for U.S. attorney in New York City, thinks life handed him a lemon and he dreams of making lemonade.

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