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Illustration on the risk of EMP attacks on the nation's power grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the electric grid has been compromised


Illustration on the success of Trumponomics in red states by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Where Trumponomics is working


Modest Growth Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax cut reality




Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique








Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

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Securing Taiwan, saving America

Forget Graham Allison's oversold volume on the so-called Thucydides Trap. If you want to read one essential China policy book this year that offers some hope that your children need not be condemned to a century of wars with China, then read "The Chinese Invasion Threat" by Ian Easton, a research fellow with the Project 2049 Institute.

Pull the plug on the NFL

One thing black folks have in common with the NFL is the billions of dollars we represent in sports marketing. We must learn to use our collective influences to affect change where there is racial injustice and disparity in our communities.

President Trump spent much time before his election criticizing former President Barack Obama for spending what he said was too much time away from the White House on golf courses, and using taxpayer moneys to fund such excursions. However, once in office, Mr. Trump has made many similar golf outings. (Associated Press photographs)

Trump plays golf, shoots 73. Haters go crazy.

Kim Jong-il, the late supreme leader of North Korea, was one heckuva golfer. He only played once, in 1994, and he reportedly shot a 38-under-par round on the country's only golf course, including 11 holes-in-one (although some reports say he only had five). That's right: Par was 72; he shot a 34. His worst score all round long was a birdie.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson looks on as President Donald Trump speaks at a luncheon with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump, Tillerson -- WTFreak

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump, reportedly stung when his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, was said to have called him a "moron," struck back -- as the president is wont to do -- and snarked in a just-released Forbes article that of the two, it's his own presidential self who's actually the smarter.

Swap football for patriotic rugby

I want to thank Vice President Pence for walking out on the NFL and their overpaid traitors. I'm also grateful for President Donald Trump and his game-changing leadership of America-first values, processes, improvements and benefits. It was the Soros-Clinton-Democratic-National-Committee operatives who approached the NFL Players' Union in the first place — and ultimately Colin Kaepernick and his copy-cat resistors — are solely responsible for this mess.

Left silent on Chicago gun violence

The Las Vegas massacre was a terrible man-made atrocity, with 58 innocents dead. It led the Democrats to scream about gun control without giving the affected victims and their love ones the opportunity to heal. Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California was among the most vocal, along with the loser of the 2016 presidential election.

Tax Cuts Growing the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stuck on stupendous mistakes

What do you call someone who keeps making the same mistake over and over and fails to learn from others who have made a similar mistake? If one doesn't know history and basic math, and the fact that people adjust their behavior on the basis of incentives, then one should not prove ignorance by commenting on the likely effects of tax changes.

Illustration on Taiwan's national day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An unhappy birthday for Taiwan

Tuesday is Taiwan's national day (known as Double Ten Day), commemorating the Wuchang Uprising, which led to the establishment of the Republic of China (ROC) in 1912. The Republic of China on Taiwan is the true heir to Sun Yat-sen's revolution.

Possible Dreamer Solution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A 'Dreamer' solution based on the rule of law

After faith and family, my country is most important. I am an American by choice, arriving here in 1969, $5,000 in debt. India was my motherland; America became my Karma-land, the provider of opportunity and systems that sustained me through the rigors of higher education, career, raising a family and serving the community. I love them both, but in the end I am an American.

Illustration on the impact of the Bonus Army riots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Justified in his course'

Washington tends to make history in its corridors, not in its streets. One consequential exception is said to be the Bonus Army fiasco of 1932, during which President Herbert Hoover loosed federal troops on unarmed, unemployed war veterans and their families as they demonstrated peacefully in the nation's capital.

In this June 26, 2017, file photo, The Supreme Court is seen in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Clarity for the Clean Water Act

The U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday on proper federal court review of a dramatic overreach of federal environmental permitting.

Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why criticize Harvey Weinstein

Ancient wisdom from a Higher Authority, which is available to anyone who takes the time to consider it, was provided to constrain people like Harvey Weinstein from acts he has been accused of committing.

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964     Associated Press photo

Having fun with diagnosing the Donald

- The Washington Times

Witch doctors are not necessarily more skilled than psychiatrists and psychologists, but they're sometimes harder on the pocketbook. A group of "mental-health professionals" have offered to resolve the Donald Trump "problem" for free. In the learned and precise professional language of their trade, they think he's "nuts."

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah waves to the media as he arrives to head the Cabinet session in Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' former official resident in Gaza City, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Hamdallah has held the first government meeting in the Gaza Strip as part of a major reconciliation effort to end the 10-year rift between Fatah and Hamas. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Less than meets a wary eye

The deal between Mahmoud Abbas' Palestinian Authority on the West Bank and Hamas in the old Gaza Strip is considerably less valuable than it looks. Although Mr. Abbas' West Bank authority will assume civilian responsibilities there, Hamas will remain in control of security, and will neither lay down its weapons nor dismantle its security forces and militias. Hamas has received arms from Iran in the past and now threatens the entire region.

In this Oct. 7, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before leaving the White House in Washington for a brief stop at Andrews Air Force Base in Md., on his way to Greensboro, N.C. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Nixing the Iran nuclear deal

You have to give a little to get a little. That's the art of the deal. But when Barack Obama bargained with Iran's mullahs over their nuclear program, he gave away the store — including the cash drawer — and only got a little time in return before the advent of the Islamic bomb. Buying peril on the lay-away plan does the world no favors. President Trump calls it "the worst deal ever negotiated," and he wants to alter it. To act in the interest of the United States, after all, is his sworn duty as president and commander in chief.

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