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Illustration on the risk of EMP attacks on the nation's power grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the electric grid has been compromised


Illustration on the success of Trumponomics in red states by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Where Trumponomics is working


Modest Growth Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax cut reality




Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique








Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Related Articles

'Mockingbird' offensive

As a full-time sixth-grade substitute teacher, I have discovered that the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book "To Kill a Mockingbird" has multiple usages of the N-word.

President Donald Trump gives thumbs up as he boards Air Force One as he departs Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., as he travels to Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Unplugging the Obama power scheme

New ideas sell better than old, and the trendy idea at the moment, the equivalent of that aroma that comes with new cars, is climate change. Or more precisely, global warming. (New labels are prescribed for fads getting soggy around the edges.) Then along came Donald Trump, who was unafraid to ask the simple question that Al Gore and his anvil chorus dreaded someone asking: Is the current view of how climate works actually accurate? The next generation deserves an honest answer.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer and President Timothy Sloan as he testifies before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Where disaster lurks online

The Democrats pretend to be the party that knows all about high tech. But some of them would get lost on a leisurely Sunday-afternoon drive through Silicon Valley. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, whom the Great Mentioner has suggested for consideration as the Democratic nominee for president, circa 2020, has inserted a couple of provisions into the National Defense Authorization Act which, if enacted, would put in jeopardy just about every Pentagon computer system and leave the country less safe, but — and here's why the Warren mischief is so attractive to Democrats — make the bureaucracy much bigger.

Assessing predatory behavior before it happen

Angela Rose, a survivor activist and the founder and executive director of Promoting Awareness/Victim Empowerment (PAVE), goes on to state that this event that happened 20 years ago had profoundly changed her life. She notes that when Steve Kardian heard her story, he told her that she was lucky to be alive. She learned that statistically, the chances of surviving such an ordeal was less than 5 percent.

In this on Aug. 22, 2017, file photo, a sign sponsored by opponents of the new Cook County tax on sweetened beverages is posted in the soda isle of Tischler Finer Foods in Brookfield, Ill. (AP Photo by Sara Burnett File)

Chicago soda tax crumbles -- now, about that gang violence

- The Washington Times

Cook County, Illinois, famous around conservative circles for its Chicago land of outrageous gun control -- a city to point to as an example of how government ought not be run -- may finally have hit one out of the ballpark. Cook County Board of Commissioners voted 15-1 to roll back a soda tax -- a 1-cent-per-ounce soda tax that had just been implemented a couple months ago. If only they could solve their gun crime problems so quickly.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a keynote conversation at the 2017 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Hell on the (Canadian) border

Canada is experiencing a sharp surge of illegal aliens, and they're not just a few angry Hillary voters making good on their bluster about moving north if Donald Trump won the election.

A man is detained by Border Patrol officials after breaching border fencing separating San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in San Diego. The man, who said he was from Chiapas, Mexico, was detained by agents as they prepared for a news conference to announce that contractors have begun building eight prototypes of President Donald Trump's proposed border wall with Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Stalling the wall

There's something that doesn't love a wall, wrote the poet Robert Frost, and that something for the moment is comprised of Democrats. President Trump's long-promised wall along the U.S. border with Mexico is slowly rising from the desert floor and his noisy political opponents are mounting a campaign to bring it down.

Illustration on religious tolerance in Bahrain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dispelling ignorance, the enemy of peace

In the Kingdom of Bahrain, for centuries we have grown up with neighbors of all faiths, all cultures and all ethnicities, so we are happy and comfortable living in a multicultural, multifaith society, and we recognize this diversity as a natural and normal way of life for us in Bahrain.

Illustration on the future of Europe by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

We'll always have Paris

Europeans seem to have an increasingly bizarre and perhaps self-destructive view of the world, and their place in it. Last week's most creative illustration: The Irish postal service issued a stamp to "commemorate" the 50th anniversary of the death of "Argentinian Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara."

Alternate Canadian Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Holocaust denial in Canada

Last week, Canada became the most recent industrialized country to officially commemorate the Holocaust by dedicating its first National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa. However, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's unveiling of the monument also unveiled the glaring omission of any mention of Jews, anti-Semitism or the 6 million Jews who were murdered in the genocide.

President Donald Trump, left, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, right, walk out together to speak to members of the media following their meeting at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Friday, Aug. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Saving public lands for working Americans

This past weekend, a little-known holiday was celebrated. National Public Lands Day, which was created in 1994, serves to "connect people to public lands in their community, inspire environmental stewardship, and encourage use of public lands for education, recreation, and general health." While National Public Lands Day may be an obscure holiday, the issue of the future of public lands is a critical one and one being hotly debated across the country today.

Tax Reaper Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why tax cuts will be a tough sell

President Trump's team has proposed tax relief for ordinary Americans and businesses that would boost growth and create jobs. Unfortunately, the recent stock market surge indicates expectations may exceed the gains tax savings could actually provide.

Illustration emphasizing U.S./ Azerbaijani cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Trump must engage Azerbaijan

As President Trump and his foreign policy team focus on the challenges posed by North Korea's reckless nuclear ambition, Russia's increasing belligerent stance, China's patient but determined quest for hegemony in Asia, and a resurgent Taliban in Afghanistan, we should not ignore one of America's most steadfast and reliable allies: Azerbaijan.

Susan Melton is comforted by James Warren Melton as she takes her seat before her son Sonny Melton's funeral at Big Sandy High School, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017,  in Big Sandy, Tenn. Melton, a registered nurse, died protecting his wife during the Las Vegas shooting massacre.  (Morgan Timms /The Jackson Sun via AP)

Revering life after Las Vegas

In the aftermath of the most deadly massacre in American history a friend asks: "Why would God allow a man to wreak so much carnage?" And the enormous violence clearly weakened my friend's belief in God. It should not have weakened his belief in God. Who else or what other agent is around to take the place of the Uncaused Cause?

The Tarnished Image of Harvey Weinstein Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hollywood's dishonest campus rape panic

For all of its flaws and fabrications, "The Hunting Ground," Harvey Weinstein's activist documentary film about sexual assault on college campuses, finally succeeded in helping to actually identify a real predator -- the filmmaker himself.

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