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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times




Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism



Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace




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President Donald Trump speaks in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, before having lunch with Republican Senators. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Journalism is dead; whatever these guys are doing isn't journalism

None of the latest stories have anyone on the record making the accusations. Instead, the "news" sites that posted the stories -- Politico, the Daily Mail and the Guardian -- simply make the surprising claims and cite anonymous sources. The subjects of the anonymous slurs have no recourse whatsoever, no right to face their accusers, no way to fight back. The accusation streams out onto the internet, where it lives forever -- whether it's true or not.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions takes off his glasses while testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about his role in the firing of James Comey, his Russian contacts during the campaign and his decision to recuse from an investigation into possible ties between Moscow and associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Jeff Sessions takes the gloves off

- The Washington Times

In Tuesday's testimony, Mr. Sessions excoriated -- in a voice that appeared quavering with anger at times -- those who are knowingly distorting plain and simple events into this vast web of conspiracy.

In this Dec. 7, 2016, file photo Megyn Kelly poses at The Hollywood Reporter's 25th Annual Women in Entertainment Breakfast in Los Angeles. Kelly defended her decision to feature "InfoWars" host Alex Jones on her NBC newsmagazine despite taking heat Monday from families of Sandy Hook shooting victims and others, saying it's her job to "shine a light" on newsmakers. Critics argue that NBC's platform legitimizes the views of a man who, among other conspiracy theories, has suggested that the killing of 26 people at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 was a hoax. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Megyn Kelly under fire as JPMorgan pulls ads

- The Washington Times

Megyn Kelly, the former darling of Fox News who's just now coming to air on NBC, has already stoked some fires with her interviewing skills -- so much so with her chat with Alex Jones of Infowars fame that JPMorgan Chase has temporarily pulled its local and digital ads from the network and her show.

Republicans: Want Trump off Twitter? Fight for him then

- The Washington Times

Once again, prominent members of President Donald Trump's own political party have come out in full force to warn him to quiet down on the tweeting front. But here's a thought: If Republicans are so bent on getting Trump off Twitter, why don't they do some of the fighting for him?

Sacred Cow of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A political stampede over India's sacred cow

India is in chaos again, but this time it's because of cows. And it's all happening during Prime Minister Narendra Modi's world tour that's underway this month.

Illustration on the plight of unionized employees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Employee Rights Act opportunity for Trump

On Wednesday, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce is holding a hearing on the Employee Rights Act (ERA). This proposed legislation, recently reintroduced by Rep. Phil Roe, Tennessee Republican, is the perfect vehicle for President Trump to regain his legislative momentum.

Government Collecting Financial Data Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Destroying financial privacy

Do you want your relatives, friends, business competitors and government bureaucrats to know precisely how much wealth you have, in what form, and how you spend all of your money?

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt attends a Cabinet meeting with President Donald Trump, Monday, June 12, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The bureaucrat behind the curtain

"Pay no attention to that man behind that curtain!" The Wizard of Oz had a good reason for trying to distract Dorothy when his true identity was revealed in the 1939 classic film. The last thing he wanted was for her to figure how things really operated.

Julius Caesar

Crossing the line to flirt with an assassination fantasy

- The Washington Times

The liberals and the left have been flirting with the fantasy of an assassination of Donald Trump since the early hours of last Nov. 9. If all the rants and diatribes, which make up the conversation where snowflakes, "intellectuals" and the morally elite gather to chat and chew, can't accomplish the elimination of the president by peaceable means, then why not by "any means necessary?"

Illustration on challenges to South Korea's economic prosperity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Advice for South Korea's Moon

In the 64 years since the end of the Korean War, South Korea has built itself into a regional economic powerhouse and a global innovator whose citizens enjoy a stable economy and democratic governance. At this moment in its history, however, serious economic, political and national security risks threaten this stunning accomplishment.

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One as he arrives at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J., Friday, June 9, 2017. Trump is spending the weekend at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Lying liars

All politicians lie, because they are human and all humans lie. The question before us is this: If President Trump lied to FBI Director James Comey, should that "lie" lead to impeachment? Did he obstruct justice when he allegedly "hoped" that Mr. Comey would not pursue an investigation of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn? Many Democrats think so. Most Republicans do not.

Tracing the special relationship between American and British navies

In "A Tale of Two Navies," we have a refreshing new look at the special relationship of Britain and America written by an Englishman. Anthony Wells, born in Coventry, a graduate of the Royal Naval College who served in the Royal Navy and then emigrated to America, became a citizen and worked for U.S. intelligence and the U.S. Navy.

Comey courted Trump confidences

Is former FBI Director James Comey so obtuse that he does not realize his own complicity in orchestrating his Jan. 6, 2017, meeting with President Trump in a manner that set the parameters for the two men's interpersonal relationship ("James Comey debunks New York Times story that fueled unproven Trump-Russia collusion," Web, June 8)?

Voting, tallying separate systems

Andrew Napolitano's "Once in a while, a good leak" (Web, June 7) reads, in part: "the NSA discovered that Russian hackers in late October and early November 2016 planted cookies (attractive, uniquely tailored links) into the websites of 122 American city and county clerks responsible for counting ballots in the presidential election. This means that if any employee of those clerks' offices clicked onto any cookie, the hackers had access to — and thus the ability to interfere with — the tabulation of votes." The good judge is wrong.

Ice Cube attends a ceremony honoring him with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday, June 12, 2017, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

An angry cloud of snowflakes

Into each life a little rain must fall, as ancient wisdom teaches, and sometimes, when the season is right, the rain turns to snow. Many of these precious snowflakes fall on campus, but not all, and sometimes the snowflakes (mostly fragile millennials who imagine themselves, like snowflakes, unique) fall on unlikely places. Southern California is the last place to expect a heavy snowfall, but it happens. We can blame President Trump, apparently not global warming.

FILE - In this Friday, June 9, 2017 file photo, Iranians attend the funeral of victims of an Islamic State militant attack, in Tehran, Iran. Its strongholds in Iraq and Syria slipping from its grasp, the Islamic State group threatened to make this years Ramadan a bloody one at home and abroad. With attacks in Egypt, Britain and Iran among others and a land-grab in the Philippines, the group is trying to divert attention from its losses and win over supporters around the world in the twisted competition for jihadi recruits. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File)

Terror turnaround in Tehran

Terrorism is a scourge born in an evil place in the heart, extinguishing hope and breeding cynicism like little else. Now that the Islamic Republic of Iran has felt the lash of wholesale murder, perhaps the hard-hearted mullahs will reconsider their "holy" war against the world. Pigs, not necessarily the favorite animals of the followers of Muhammad, will sooner fly.

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