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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

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Social warriors, sometimes

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MSNBC'S  Joe Scarborough predicted on Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, that President Donald Trump will be "crushed" by the media unless his administration changes its behavior towards journalists. (MSNBC screenshot)

Thank you, MSNBC: First Maddow, now Scarborough, lots of LOLs

- The Washington Times

MSNBC, fresh off a red face from Rachel Maddow TV revelations that were tantamount to reporting, "hey, President Donald Trump paid his taxes," apparently tried a bounce-back of sorts with another host, Joe Scarborough, who attempted to prove his mettle by taking on a Top Trump Dog, attorney Michael Cohen, via Twitter. And in social media lingo? LOL.

In this Thursday, March 2, 2017, file photo, Middlebury College students turn their backs to author Charles Murray during his lecture in Middlebury, Vt. The college says it has initiated an independent investigation into the protest in which the author of a book discussing racial differences in intelligence was shouted down during the guest lecture and a professor was injured. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke, File)

Middlebury College rage may have shocked the liberal consciousness

- The Washington Times

It was an angry, hateful rage, which may have even shocked the liberal consciousness. Earlier this month, a violent mob of students at Middlebury College assaulted liberal professor Allison Stanger and chased her and Charles Murray, a Libertarian scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, off the campus where he was asked to speak.

In this Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, is joined onstage by first lady Michelle Obama, left, President Barack Obama, second from left, Chelsea Clinton, second from right, and former President Bill Clinton, right, after speaking at a rally at Independence Mall in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Please God, not another Clinton

- The Washington Times

Please, God, make it stop. Eight years of Bill Clinton. Two White House tries of Hillary Clinton. Four more years of Hillary at State. And now their child, Chelsea, seems to be positioning herself for some kind of political run, too? No, no, no, no, no.

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, left, and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, right, listen as President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with members of his Cabinet in the Cabinet Room at the White House, Monday, March 13, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

For greens, it's 'get ready to rumble' time

- The Washington Times

The White House announced it's opening a review into fuel efficiency standards set in place by the previous Barack Obama administration -- and you know what that means, don't you? Environmental groups are gearing to fight

White House Press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Send in the bullies

Watching White House press secretary Sean Spicer get verbally attacked at an Apple store by an unhinged activist was bizarre, but not entirely surprising as the left continues its meltdown over being rejected by the American people.

Old Glory Gun Rights Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Second Amendment as an individual right

Since San Bernardino, Sandy Hook, Columbine et al., the "progressives," the media and their acolytes have beaten their chests calling for even stricter gun restrictions, although the most restrictive states and cities that have the highest crime. They insist that the Second Amendment does not apply to individuals, but only to the National Guard, even though the modern Guard did not come into existence until the Dick Act of 1903.

Illustration on dystopian Pakistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What went wrong in Pakistan

Pakistan was meant to be a model, an example for other nations to emulate. It was founded after World War II, as the sun was setting on the British Empire and India was preparing for independence. India's Muslims, though glad to see the end of the Raj, were apprehensive about becoming a minority in a Hindu-majority land.

The Burnie Thompson Show Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A livestreaming unsung hero

When Burnie Thompson sat down with CNN Politics just before the 2012 elections, the cable news channel's host prefaced her first question by saying that she knew she was about to get a "snarky response."

Illustration on the history of the White House fence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the fence over White House security

The recent breach of White House security by an intruder Friday night reinforces once more that the issue of protecting the president of the United States has been put off -- it's on the fence, so to speak. No matter that a series of intrusions has plagued the White House in recent years, federal authorities seem to be following the not-so-grand illusion that the Secret Service can stop violators before significant harm is done.

Upgrading National Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nuclear missile surprises

The United States and its allies, informed largely by opinions of Washington foreign policy and media elites, have for years regarded nuclear weapon and missile programs in North Korea, Iran, and Pakistan as technologically primitive.

Get government out of health care

I don't want Ryancare, I don't want Trumpcare and I definitely do not want Obamacare. The latter has wrecked the economy and therefore many people's livelihoods. House Speaker Paul Ryan says we have to save the system. What system? Ryan says he's been working on it for 20 years. That just makes him even more of a fool.

Obamacare worse than GOP fix

I am no fan of the GOP's Obamacare replacement plan, but as an engineer I always must evaluate the 'do-nothing' option. The Congressional Budget Office has said that under the replacement plan, 24 million people will lose health-care coverage by 2026. But how many people will lose their coverage under Obamacare by 2018?

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks with reporters as Democrats criticize the Republican health care plan, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017. The White House and Republican leaders in Congress are scrambling to shore up support for their health care bill after findings from the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 14 million people would lose insurance coverage in the first year alone under the GOP replacement for Obamacare. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Taking brickbats to the wall

Barack Obama is gone from the White House, but his malign influence hangs over Washington like a blue haze. He failed to "fundamentally transform" America, but Democrats who made his slogan their own refuse to surrender the defeated cause. Despite the fact that Donald Trump has occupied the Oval Office for nearly two months, the opposition party stubbornly acts in concert with the "not my president" crowd. Their tune sounds dangerously close to "not my nation."

'Enforcement matters, deterrence matters'

Perhaps it's a variant of Mitt Romney's notion of "self-deportation," but President Trump's tough talk on illegal immigration is discouraging the waves of illegal immigration even before the first brick or cinder block is laid in what he calls his "big, beautiful" wall on the border.

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