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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times


Social warriors, sometimes

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President Donald Trump speaks at a rally Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

What, now Trump's to be taken seriously? How convenient

- The Washington Times

Here's a question that's floating in the winds of judicial clamp-down on President Donald Trump's latest travel ban: Since when did anybody on the left, to include activist judges, consider Trump and his blunt style of speaking anything but clownish in the first place?

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, confers with the committee's ranking member, Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017, prior to the start of the committee's hearing on the investigation of nude photographs of female Marines and other women that were shared on the Facebook page "Marines United."  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

John McCain's jump the shark moment

- The Washington Times

Sen. John McCain, the Republican from Arizona, apparently facing a brief lull in all the television interviews he's given lately to attack President Donald Trump, took to the Senate floor to deliver a scathing verbal assault on a fellow senator, another Republican, this one, Rand Paul from Kentucky.

Lying Congress and the lying anti-repealers

- The Washington Times

Congress isn't going to repeal Obamacare. That whole Republican-driven mantra that's been making the media wave since 2010 -- the one that blasted Barack Obama as a socialist for signing government health care into law and that vowed a concerted fight for repeal? Bunk. Bull. Boldface lie.

Trump Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seizing a historic opportunity

President Trump presents his first budget to Congress on Thursday. It is, as The Washington Post points out, "historic" because if adopted, it would be the biggest contraction in the federal government since the end of World War II. Predictably, a Post story focuses on the number of federal workers it estimates could lose their jobs, rather than on whether those jobs and the programs associated with them are necessary.

Illustration on an American/Saudi Arabian alliance against Iranian hegemony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The resetting of U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman arrived in Washington this week to meet with President Trump and his team and to reset the U.S.-Saudi relationship, which hit an all-time low during the Obama administration.

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the Capitol in Phoenix Wednesday, March 15, 2017. O'Connor, who served in the Arizona state Senate as a member and majority leader from 1969 until she because a state court judge in 1973, was honored for her work promoting civics education. (AP Photo/Bob Christie)

Madison's principles on trial

James Madison, the author of the Bill of Rights, once said that "[g]overnment is instituted to protect property of every sort. This being the end of government, that alone is a just government which impartially secures to every man whatever is his own."

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The scorning of Moscow

A fog has descended on American political life, and it is rather hard for the average citizen to understand what is going on. The mainstream media are daily clamoring for more heads to roll in the administration and for independent investigations to be launched amid allegations of collusion between Donald Trump's campaign team and the Kremlin, for which the hacking of the Democratic National Convention server is highlighted as one of the presumed "smoking guns."

Illustration on campus culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the violent campus reflects a sordid culture

Middlebury College, a symbol of violent rioting in the name of tolerance, is easy to scorn and disdain. Nice boys and girls, sons and daughters of nice moms and dads, get caught acting out on intolerant impulses, and a "disturbance" sends a professor to the hospital. (At Ole Miss this would be called a "riot.")

Addressing the use of force by innocent civilians

What justifies the use of lethal force in self-defense? On the surface, it seems to be a simple concept, particularly to laymen; but the question is one of the most complex and thorny legal issues that prosecutors and courts of law can deal with.

FILE - This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo, shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access pipeline is taking place with boring equipment routing the pipeline underground and across Lake Oahe to connect with the existing pipeline in Emmons County near Cannon Ball, N.D. Federal Judge James Boasberg on Tuesday, March 14 denied a request by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux to stop oil from flowing while they appeal his earlier decision allowing pipeline construction to finish. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)

Tubes, tunnels, pipelines and progress

The Dakota Access Pipeline that triggered the resistance of the Indians, or Native Americans as some of them want to be called, is nearly complete and ready to take oil to the refineries. The Keystone XL Pipeline project, which endured an on-again, off-again status during the Obama years, is on again. It's a new day for energy in America.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, right, waits for Air Force One with President Donald Trump aboard, to arrive Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. Trump is scheduled to visit the home of President Andrew Jackson and later in the day speak about health care at a rally. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

Health care in the balance

Lost in the partisan bluster and shouting about the future of Obamacare, and the Republican "repeal and replace" reform, is the stark reality that the nation has arrived, finally, at the point where it must decide what kind of health care it wants, and how to pay for it.

Remove state-line limitation

To the majority in Congress: Please explain why you have not already produced a one-page bill to remove the federal limitations on selling health insurance across state lines. It remains a mystery why this is not a part of the current Republican health-care proposal, and even more why it has not already been done as a separate item. With not even an attempt to tell us why we are still waiting for it, the current majority in Congress appears to once again be the gang that can't (or is it won't?) shoot straight. You've got a lot of explaining to do.

Free speech means tolerance

As a professor, I was shocked to read the article detailing how a mob prevented free speech at Middlebury College and injured a professor there ("Middlebury College professors stand up for free speech after Charles Murray debacle," Web, March 8). The essence of democracy is the free exchange and expression of ideas. Democracies require educated citizens to thrive and a significant portion of that education entails being exposed to differing points of view.

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