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Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat









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Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani talks late Friday, July21, 2017 in his first televised speech since the dispute between Qatar and three Gulf countries and Egypt, in Doha, Qatar. Qatar's ruling emir says the embattled Gulf nation remains open to dialogue with four Arab countries that have isolated it, but that and resolution to the crisis must respect his country's sovereignty. (Qatar News Agency via AP)

Restrain Qatar to counter the Shia terror hegemon in Middle East

The Arab Gulf alliance of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, UAE, and Bahrain recently reinstated their 13 demands on Qatar to restore relations and end sanctions. "We reiterate the importance of Qatar's compliance with the 13 demands outlined by the four states," said a joint statement released by the foreign ministers on July 31.

In this combination photo, director Spike Lee, left, appears at the premiere of "Touched With Fire" on Feb. 10, 2016, in New York and San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick appears at a news conference on Jan. 1, 2017, after an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks in Santa Clara, Calif. On Aug. 8, 2017, Lee tweeted an advertisement for an Aug. 23, 2017, rally for Kaepernick outside the NFL's New York City headquarters. (AP Photo/Files)

Colin Kaepernick, so bad he needs a rally

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick is in a bit of a bind. He used to be a quarterback of somewhat high esteem with the 49ers. But that was pre-2016. Now football fans know him as struggling and unsigned -- and non-football fans know him as the guy with the 'fro who despises his country so much he spent a significant portion of 2016 kneeling during the playing of the national anthem.

In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Hillary Clinton, the wanna-be preacher

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton wants to be a spiritual leader. That's right. Post-epic election fail, the woman whose face and name have become synonymous with Political Scandal wants to reinvent with religion. Odd? Well, consider this: There is a lot of money to be made in the selling of God's word.

In this file photo taken Jan. 28, 2017, President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

Trump's 200 days short on GOP support

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's administration, just rounding the corner into 200 days of leadership, has fallen short of realizing a key campaign promise, the repeal of Obamacare. Thanks go to Republicans for that failure.

In this Friday, Aug. 4, 2017, file photo, Venezuela's Constitutional Assembly poses for an official photo after being sworn in, at the National Assembly in Caracas, Venezuela. The Constitutional Assembly is expected to meet again on Tuesday, Aug. 8, and despite growing international criticism, Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro has remained firm in pressing the body forward in executing his priorities. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos, File)

The insurance compulsion

Venezuela is the latest global disaster caused by socialism. Over the last couple of hundred years, virtually every variety of socialism has been tried -- from communism to national socialism (Nazism) and fascism, to various varieties of "democratic socialism" -- with one common characteristic -- they all failed.

Illustration on unreliable alternate power by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The high cost of unreliable power

The climate obsessions of the Obama administration yielded a substantial myopia with respect to the other central goals of energy policy, the cost and reliability of the electric power system in particular.

Illustration on the deteriorating Venezuela situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The coming collapse of Venezuela

- The Washington Times

As U.S. policymakers fret about Syria, Afghanistan, Ukraine and North Korea, far too little attention is being paid to the powder keg to the south of us that may be about to blow. Once-prosperous Venezuela has been coming apart for years, but the roundly condemned Constituent Assembly election engineered by presidential strongman Nicolas Maduro lit the fuse that could ignite a civil war in his country. With a Sunday attack by uniformed insurgents on a military base, the internecine battle may have already begun.

Illustration on PETA's attempts at insinuating itself into the Trump administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dogging the Trumps

This past weekend saw the annual Animal Rights Conference take place just outside our nation's capital. The event is a who's who of activists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the Humane Society of the United States, and like-minded groups that converge to discuss tactics for getting rid of meat, ice cream, circuses, zoos, aquariums, leather belts and silk shirts.

Former Vice President Al Gore. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When life gets tough for just about everybody

- The Washington Times

Life is tough, as the man said, and three out of three people die. It's apparently a lot worse than we thought. The world is coming apart at the seams, just like the naysayers said it would. Times have got so tough that you can't even trust fake news.

Confirmation of Christopher Wray as FBI Director Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A steady hand in an unsteady time

The FBI is the premier investigative agency in the world, with more than 35,000 agents and staff working all around the globe. The men and women of the FBI work diligently to disrupt and prevent terrorist attacks on America and to preserve the liberties of all Americans by upholding and enforcing the rule of law.

A famed novelist and his fatal hubris

You've really got to respect a novelist's biographer who begins his book with a quote like this from its subject: "Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, 'There never was a good biography of a novelist. There couldn't be. He is too many people if he is any good.' "

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.

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