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Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s dollar



Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times








Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn


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In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Twitter users are poking fun at United's tactics in having a man removed from an overbooked Chicago to Louisville flight on April 9, 2017.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) **FILE**

United Airlines and the golden age of airline deregulation

- The Washington Times

Blame Islamist terrorists and, yes, government airline deregulation for United Airlines' thuggish and bloody assault on a passenger on April 10. (Let the record show that for a decade I editorialized for deregulation and still think, within rational limits - I want a Food and Drug Administration -- the freer the markets the better for consumers and society in general.)

A European Union flag waves in the wind in front of the Chancellery in Berlin on Oct. 12, 2012. **FILE**

'Old Europe' sinks under the weight of secular progressivism

This week the existential problems facing the European Union came into stark relief as Belgium threatened Poland and Hungary with legal action if they did not agree to commit cultural suicide by letting in hundreds of thousands of "refugees" from the Middle East. This comes on the heels of Facebook-livestreamed rapes in Sweden, truck attacks in France and other Western European capitals, and jihadist bombs targeting the buses of famous soccer teams in Germany.

In this April 28, 2014, file photo, the Phoenix VA Health Care Center in Phoenix. The Veterans Affairs Department unveiled a new website Wednesday, April 12, 2107, aimed at providing information on the quality of care at VA medical centers, touting new accountability even as it grappled with fresh questions of patient safety in its beleaguered health system.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Why can't we take care of our sick veterans?

- The Washington Times

A director at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C., was just removed from his post after a government watchdog blasted the facility for unsanitary conditions. But the director wasn't fired -- only demoted. And he wasn't even named in the VA's announcement of his demotion-- as if we're still trying to protect those who can't even protect our nation's most honorable.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to moderator Greta Van Susteren at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, April 12, 2017, during "The President and the Press: The First Amendment in the First 100 Days" forum. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sean Spicer's humble apology a sign of good governance

- The Washington Times

The left is going batty over Sean Spicer's Hitler mishap, mocking and scoffing the White House press secretary for mistakenly stating the former Nazi leader "didn't even sink to using chemical weapons" against citizens or using "gas on his own people" the way Syria's President Bashar Assad did. But Spicer's humble rebound is commendable.

Higher Education Commissioner Joseph Rallo, center, answers questions from House budget committee members while Board of Regents Chairman Richard Lipsey, right, listens, on Wednesday, April 12, 2017, in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

The GOP's best choice for education reform

Republicans in control in Washington have to decide whether to exert themselves on a range of issues to improve the economic and social conditions for millions of Americans or merely tinker at the margins with small-potato approaches.

Perils of the Rules of Engagement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When breaking the rules of engagement is right

Donald Trump and James Mattis came to office vowing to "win" America's wars again. But unless they change our politically correct military culture, it is certain America won't.

Executing the Guily and the Innocent Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Executing the guilty and innocent

Nearly three dozen men sit on death row in Arkansas, where capital punishment has been suspended since 2005. Unless clemency is granted, seven of them -- an eighth man was granted a temporary reprieve -- will be given lethal injections all within a 10-day period, between April 17 and 27.

Illustration on the pregnancy problem in the U.S. Navy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Love Boats sail again

Women can do most things as well as men. Almost nobody any longer disputes that. Women can do some things better than men. Many women thought Donald Trump as president would be a disaster for the final female assault on the glass ceiling. It hasn't turned out quite that way, and women, such as Nikki Haley and Betsy DeVos, have been stars of his new administration.

Ownership of the AR-15 Rifle Included in the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the Second Amendment protects the AR-15

For decades the federal judiciary has been trying to interpret the Second Amendment out of the Constitution. It is, as Sanford Levinson has termed it, an "embarrassment" to an elite class of legal scholars that finds firearms to be unusual and repulsive objects. Now the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that the semi-automatic AR-15 rifle is not covered by the Second Amendment, despite that fact that is the most common rifle sold in the United States. This execrable decision is the latest outrage in a long series of disingenuous judicial contortions.

Maximizing losses

As a macroeconomics student, I agree with Richard Berman ("Minimum wage resistance," Web, March 6). The basic idea behind the minimum-wage hike is good, but there are disadvantages that come with such a law.

The sailors' revolt that influenced an election

A consensus holds that last year's politics were messy; some say the messiest ever, but A. Roger Ekirch tells us otherwise. In 1800 the run-up to the nation's "first full-blown presidential campaign" was messier, and arguably more important in its long-term consequences, though only time can tell.

FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2017, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Promising to "expose the Republican Party for what it is," Sanders predicted April 12, that President Donald Trump would be a one-term president as the liberal icon prepared to launch a nationwide tour to rally Democrats. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Fizzler in Kansas, surviving hopes in Georgia

Congressional Democrats were counting on two special elections this month to provide the smelling salts to revive their dispirited ranks. The first, on Tuesday in Kansas, fizzled. Now all hope is focused on a reliably red district in the suburbs of Atlanta.

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