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Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat









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Use social media, but with caution

"Young job hopefuls not hiding their social media past, survey finds" (Web, Aug. 9) claims that young people seeking employment no longer believe their social media will negatively affect job opportunities. As a young person in the job market, I would say this is true, but with hard exceptions.

Statue not an immigrant beacon

In "Not everyone can join the American nation" (Web, Aug. 8) Clifford May argues that CNN's Jim Acosta was wrong to say that Emma Lazarus' poem, "The New Colossus," inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, set a U.S. policy of admitting immigrants considered the "wretched refuse" of foreign lands. Mr. May argues on prudential grounds, but there is a historical argument, too.

Participants carry an American flag during the 4th of July parade in Santa Monica, Calif. on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Decked out in red, white and blue, Californians waved flags and sang patriotic songs at Independence Day parades across the state. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

We are America

- The Washington Times

The hand-wringers were out in full force this past week, moaning and wailing about President Donald Trump's rhetoric regarding North Korea. But why? We are America. We don't bow down; we don't quiver in fear.

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster listens as President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after a security briefing at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

H.R. McMaster foes slammed as 'Islamophobes,' 'white supremacists'

- The Washington Times

H.R. McMaster, President Trump's choice of national security adviser, has what some say is a shady record of defense of Israel -- and what others outright label as subversive to America's interests. Now, the Council on American Islamic Relations jumped to McMaster's defense. But that alone is a red flag. Having CAIR as a friend isn't exactly exonerating.

This Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Leftover opioids are a common dilemma for surgery patients; a study published Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, suggests that after several common operations most don't use all their pills and many store the remainders unsafely at home. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot) ** FILE **

Opioids: In defense of the pain pills

- The Washington Times

If you've never experienced chronic pain, or been around someone with a pain that just won't end, it's easy to dismiss opioids as evil and to make grand calls for their prescription restriction, or even outright bans.

Immigration rights activists chant anti-Trump slogans as they urge Republican lawmakers in Florida to firmly oppose President Donald Trump's proposals to increase funding for immigration enforcement as deadlines for budget decisions near in Congress, Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, in Doral, Fla. Dian Alarcon, second from right, said Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart's office told a smaller group on Tuesday the border wall measure would likely not be approved in the Senate. Diaz-Balart's chief of staff Cesar Gonzalez told members of the media he would not comment. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Dianne Feinstein rips Trump as 'cruel' for deporting illegals

- The Washington Times

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, on the heels of a deportation that led to a separated family, issued a scathing statement against President Donald Trump, suggesting his border controls were beyond what's necessary for national security. She also called him really, really mean, and that she might tell his mother on him if he doesn't cut it out.

BOOK REVIEW: Three Minutes to Doomsday

Conrad, Ramsey and others in this spy ring gave the Soviets American's defensive war plans, nuclear launch codes and other military secrets. It was a devastating breach of security.

FILE - In this July 4, 2017, file photo, a U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, is seen at a golf course in Seongju, South Korea. North Korea claims it is in the final stages of preparing a plan to launch four intermediate-range ballistic missiles over Japan and into waters just off the island of Guam, where about 7,000 U.S. troops are based. The U.S. has pumped billions of dollars into its missile defense systems and sold hundreds of millions of dollars' worth to its allies, including the very controversial deployment of a state-of-the-art system known by its acronym, THAAD, in South Korea. (Kim Jun-beom/Yonhap via AP, File)

The South Pacific's strategic role

With the growing threat of long-range ballistic missile launches from North Korea, a new front has opened up in the Pacific's strategic framework: The South Pacific.

Illustration on Trump and the TPP by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump can learn from Barack Obama's TPP mistakes

During the 2016 campaign, Donald Trump bucked party orthodoxy on the left and the right, promising to withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and re-negotiate America's "horrible trade deals," including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The president's pledge to stand up for American workers and businesses helped cement the election, moving voters in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Ohio and flipping those states red.

Illustration on diffusing conflict with Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bringing Qatar back from open conflict with its brothers

The dispute between Qatar and its Arab neighbors hurts everyone involved. Qatar had agreed to cooperate with the other governments including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Instead, they are involved in a boycott that verges on open warfare.

Getting students safely to and from school is a top priority. The AAA School Safety Patrol Program helps ensure that kids can do that. Ushers lead kids across intersections. (AAA)

School safety patrols: Priority No. 1

- The Washington Times

When it comes to education, it should go without saying that teaching and learning are the top priorities inside schoolhouses. Getting students safely to and fro, then, is Priority No. 1.

Former National Security Adviser Susan E. Rice's checkered history continues to haunt her in the post-Obama era. (Associated Press)

Susan Rice's ridiculous North Korea recommendation to Trump

- The Washington Times

Susan Rice offered up some recommendations to President Trump, on his dealings with North Korea, that went pretty much like this: Do nothing. Her advice, by way of an opinion piece in the New York Times, is titled, "It's Not Too Late on North Korea." A better title, though, is this: "Why America's So Happy Barack Obama's Gone."

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