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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times




Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism



Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace




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Illustration on responding to political rage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why so much rage?

That didn't take long. Less than 48 hours after the shooting rampage targeting Republican members of Congress and their staff on a baseball field in Alexandria, Va., followed by the picture of Republicans and Democrats kneeling in prayer at Nationals Park before their annual charity game, things returned to normal or abnormal.

Illustration on the faults of the NIEHS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chemical scaremongering

It's great news the Trump administration is starting to dismantle the junk science life-support system for government overregulation. Budget cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and reforms of science advisory panels at the Department of Interior and EPA, stir hope the agencies' longstanding reigns of terror via "science" may come to an end.

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2014, file photo, protesters participate in a rally on Chicago's south side as labor organizers escalate their campaign raise the minimum wage for employees to $15 an hour. Amid a national push by unions and worker advocates for a $15 minimum wage, Illinois Democrats hope to pass an ambitious hike during the spring legislative session, despite a warning from Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner that he opposes an increase of any kind. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Curtains for union coercion

In 1947 organized labor spent today's equivalent of $11 million opposing the Slave Labor Act. The act is better known today as Taft-Hartley. Despite the union's rant, it was designed to provide protection against abusive and often violent labor unions. Now on the 70th anniversary of that law, Congress is again poised to realign employment relationships free from coercive union pressures.

Illustration on the excessive costs of scientific research by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The high overhead of scientific research

Last year American taxpayers spent more than $42 billion for scientific research and education at universities and nonprofits across the country. Most of this investment contributed to American innovation, economic competitiveness and national security.

Illustration on elements of the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The American Dream, alive and well

Almost any time you see the phrase "the American Dream" these days, it seems to be in a negative context. The speaker is either assuring us that it's dead or that it can be salvaged only by a radical redefinition -- one that often contradicts the basic principles this country was founded on.

Illustration on the death of cash by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Breaking the monopoly on money

If mankind can figure out how to give everyone instant communication and all the world's knowledge via the smartphone, why are we not smart enough to figure out equally convenient, quick, low-cost and secure ways of paying for goods and services to everyone on the planet? Actually, we are.

Illustration on protecting the Baltic nations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NATO's Baltic challenge

President Trump was coy about his commitment to NATO's Article 5, which considers an attack on one member state is an attack on all. Most informed observers saw this as a bargaining ploy to get the attention of those member states who have not met the NATO defense spending target of 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP).

How to liberate children from 'perpetual adolescence'

"I believe our entire nation is in the midst of a collective coming of age crisis without parallel in our history," writes Ben Sasse, junior senator from Nebraska and former president of Midland University.

Return to private-sector insurance

Obamacare, Ryancare, McConnellcare, etc., are all disasters for the quality and expense of medical care in America. The solution is returning 80 percent of Americans to private-sector insurance in a nationwide marketplace. As insurance companies compete for customers, we will see the choices multiply. Federal mandates will be eliminated and the states will be encouraged to eliminate mandates as well.

Congress wasting taxpayer money

As sad as it was, last week's deliberate shooting of members of the GOP probably surprised few people. The Republican Party in particular decries the failings of one federal agency and its employees after another. Yet almost every day the GOP and Democrats alike throw at each other the politics of immature obstruction, insults and finger-pointing. Either party passing a bill but not getting it to the president's desk is not success, it is legislative failure.

FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, vials filled with samples of marijuana are arranged at the Blum medical marijuana dispensary, in Reno, Nev. Nevada's marijuana regulators are working furiously to launch recreational sales on July 1, a fast-approaching deadline that could hinge on a court deciding whether the powerful liquor industry should be guaranteed a piece of the pot pie before tourists and residents can light up. Lawyers for the liquor industry, marijuana retailers and the state are facing a judge Monday, June 19, 2017, to argue whether Nevada has the authority to issue marijuana distribution licenses to anyone besides alcohol distributors. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File)

Disappointment in Potlandia

Curing cancer and eliminating heart disease would be nice, but what the government -- federal, state and local -- would like most of all is a new source of revenue, i.e., something new to tax.

Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez Parilla addresses the media during a news conference in Vienna, Austria, Monday, June 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Greater expectations for Cuba

There's more to life than pursuit of the dollar. It's not a message necessarily expected from a billionaire president, but in reversing his predecessor's Cuba policies, President Trump reminded the world that prosperity grows in the sunshine of freedom, and dwindles in the darkness where democracy dies.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos attends a Cabinet meeting with President Donald Trump, Monday, June 12, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

School choice for military families: Educational freedom for those who secure our freedom

Last month at a policy summit for the American Federation for Children, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos heralded the advent of "the most ambitious expansion of education choice in our nation's history." President Trump, she said, was committed to "empowering parents to make the best choices for their kids' education."

Illustration on the limited vision of politicized jurists on the question of nullification by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sanctuaries, for goose and gander, too

Since the beginning of this century, officials in states and localities controlled by the Democratic Party have increasingly disregarded laws, referenda and court decisions that affront their "progressive" sensibilities. That amounts to nullification, and it's hard for the federal government to impose its will on them. But now the progressives are going to learn that two can play at that game.

Defunding ARPAe Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The little agency that does

Cleaner, more secure, more affordable energy has been a national goal since America's founding. Whalers braved storms for it in the 1800s. Diplomats sought to secure supply lines for it more recently. In the last few years, a little-known federal agency with a long, complicated name has found a better way to get us closer to this elusive goal. The Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy (ARPA-E) does it by more effectively using the nation's most essential resource: ingenuity.

Illustration on vocational education for manufacture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of apprenticeship

- The Washington Times

My father was the president of the Rockford, Illinois Labor Council when I was a kid. He was a machinist at a time when Rockford and Cincinnati were the centers of the nation's machine tool industry. I remember that many of those working as machinists in Rockford back then were Hungarian refugees; skilled machinists who had fled after Soviet tanks had put down their attempt to topple their Communist government in 1956.

Illustration on Trump's potential impact on America's space program in the 21st century by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump, the new JFK in space

Bill Gates first noticed parallels between President John F. Kennedy and President-elect Donald Trump after speaking with the newly electd president: "But in the same way President Kennedy talked about the space mission and got the country behind that, there can be a very upbeat message that [Trump's] administration [is] going to organize things, get rid of regulatory barriers, and have American leadership through innovation."

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 19, 2017

Much fast growth right around the corner

Every day there are legions of new economists who dismiss the Donald Trump economic agenda and his forecast of 3 percent growth as a wild-eyed fantasy. The consensus is that the economy "can't possibly grow at 3 percent" says The Wall Street Journal. "Slow growth is the new norm, so get used to it," writes Rucir Sharma, Morgan Stanley, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley in Foreign Affairs magazine this month.

Roman Bellis, 4, and his dad, Dana Bellis, Millersburg, Pa., wear "Best. Dad. Ever." and "Best. Kid. Ever." shirts at the 67th annual Father's Day Breakfast at Valley View Park in Valley View, Pa., Sunday, June 18, 2017. The breakfast is sponsored by the St. Andrew's United Methodist Church's men's Bible class. (Jacqueline Dormer/Republican-Herald via AP)

A fatherly manner

It's Father's Day, or the day after, depending on when you read this. Statistics about the decline of fatherhood are very sobering, but I'm not here to bring readers down or to make people feel bad if they did not have or don't have a happy family life.

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