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Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s dollar



Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times








Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn


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China's Margaret Chan, General Director of the World Health Organization, WHO, makes closing remarks during a panel on Neglected Tropical Diseases for the celebration of the fifth anniversary of the London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), in Geneva, Switzerland, on Tuesday, April 18, 2017. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)

Making sense of disease risk

I need a full arsenal of medical screening tools at my disposal to help my patients. Some of the tools I have are new, and others have been around a long time. They help me assess the risk of getting a disease, or in the case of a colonoscopy or a cardiac stress test, of already having one.

Illustration on Erdogan's impact on Turkey by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The end of Turkey's democratic experiment

On the grounds of the Turkish Embassy facing Massachusetts Ave. in Washington, D.C. is a statue of Mustafa Kamal Ataturk, father of the Republic of Turkey, the nation-state he built from the rubble of the defeated Ottoman Empire and Islamic caliphate.

A political porcupine

Good biography should not just bring the subject individual into clearer focus, it also should inform us about how that life has something to tell us about current events. This meticulously annotated selection from the diaries of our sixth president reads like the banner headlines of today's news reports of political intrigue, raw ambitions and the same existential crisis that divides our nation today.

Give states back their land

In his otherwise excellent article on federal land grabs ("A monumental issue in Maine," B3, April 17), Robert Knight fails to mention why Washington is able to get away with this.

How to sway North Korea

President Trump has pointed out the strong linkage between China and North Korea, and he correctly assumes China can influence North Korea's weapons-development program. We must work with China to resolve this situation, the Chinese encroachment in the South China Sea and the trade-deficit imbalance.

'Snowflake' schools prepare no one

How ironic was The Washington Times' juxtaposition of two articles in yesterday's edition ("The Halls of Ivy," Inside the Beltway; "Trump to Use Executive Order to Push 'Hire American,'"). Maybe when universities like Arizona State start offering, teaching and testing students on courses that actually prepare them for a future in the work world instead of wasting parents' and taxpayers' money on country-club living with a side helping of "snowflake" protection, perhaps then the H-1B visa program will become extinct. If I were the CEO of a company looking to hire people with the skill sets needed to improve my business, these students would be at the bottom of my list.

Supporters of the 'no' vote, chant slogans during a protest against the referendum outcome, on the Aegean Sea city of Izmir, Turkey, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Turkey's main opposition party has filed a formal request seeking Sunday's referendum to be annulled because of voting irregularities. (AP Photo/Emre Tazegul)

Cooking Turkey's goose

Turkey has been bumping along on the ragged margins of democracy for years. With this week's slim approval of a governmental reform referendum, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has proclaimed that the nation can "change gears and continue along our course more quickly."

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May walks out of 10 Downing Street to speak to the media in London, Tuesday April 18, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May announced she will seek early election on June 8 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Theresa May's gamble

Theresa May showed herself Tuesday to be a bit of a gambler, but only a bit. Armed with public-opinion polls revealing an unusual opportunity to trade a sure thing for a better thing, she stunned Britain, surprised Europe and fascinated Washington by calling for new parliamentary elections on June 8.

Bill O'Reilly

Bill O'Reilly -- good riddance to bad rubbish

With Bill O'Reilly, so many shoes have dropped that he's looking like Imelda Marcos. Just two weeks ago, The New York Times reported that Fox paid out $13 million to five women who accused the bombastic bloviator of sexual harassment. Mr. O'Reilly told The Times that he settled only to avoid hurting his family.

Women look at video of Syria Charity presentation inside an exhibition hall at the France Muslim Annual Fair in Le Bourget, north of Paris, in this Saturday, April 15, 2017, file photo. Tens of thousands of Muslims are expected at the three-day event this weekend organized by the ultra-conservative Union of Islamic Organizations of France. It includes merchant stalls, Koran readings, prayers and speeches by leading Muslim figures as Muslims of France want to make sure their voices are heard in France's presidential elections. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

The Islam clash in America

- The Washington Times

The arrest and charge of an Indian woman, Jumana Fakhruddin Nagarwala, for performing female genital mutilation on two young girls in Michigan, brings front and center the question of whether certain religions are compatible with America's Constitution. Certain religions -- ha. Let's be blunt here. We're talking about Islam.

Illustration on the diminishing returns of the $15 minimum wage quest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A story of union waste

Lost in the shuffle of health care debates and Syrian airstrikes, America's most boisterous union recently released its 2016 financials. The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) -- the catalyst of the Fight for $15 and a Union campaign -- reveals exactly how union bosses spent member dues money last year.

Illustration on difficulties with tax cuts by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Trump's taxing problems

Donald Trump won the presidency in significant measure on a promise to deliver more robust growth and better jobs. As things stand, his efforts and GOP prospects for the midterm elections will importantly hinge on accomplishing tax reforms that encourage more investment.

Illustration on the wonders of incentivization by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of the price system

Kinder and gentler governments use market-based price incentives and less coercion. But all too many government officials forget about the superiority of the price system, and resort to the threat of or actual violence to get the people to do what they want. Business people use the price system to attract customers with lower prices and good employees by offering higher wages (the price of work) rather than coercion.

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