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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times




Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism



Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace




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Illustration on moral confusion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The enemy within

The winds of counterrevolution are blowing across America, and they're aimed directly at President Trump and the conservative establishment.

Illustration on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The tragic Bolshevik legacy, 100 years on

This year marks 100 years since the Bolshevik Revolution took place in Russia. That year, the centuries-old czardom of Russia and the brief liberal democracy that replaced it collapsed and was soon replaced by the Soviet Union, the world's first stable communist state.

Illustration on the history of the Department of Justice by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A tortuous start for Justice

If you think the Department of Justice is grabbing the headlines these days, on June 22, 1870, the news was even bigger. Congress seemingly remedied the federal government's legal shortcomings that day when it created the department.

Pelosi needs reality check

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has once again demonstrated an unbridled level of buffoonery. Her recent proclamation that the hateful and violent incidents we see today can be traced back to the 1990s during the Clinton administration and the attacks by conservatives and Republicans on Bill and Hillary is simply ludicrous and unfounded ("Pelosi: 'Outrageous' for Republicans to blame Democrats for heated rhetoric," Web, June 15).

Immigrants infuse U.S. with life

Is America still the last, best hope for mankind? That status could have slipped some on our watch (see Iraq, deficit spending). And we have been a bit stupid (see Citizens United, concealed carry, extended ammo clips). Well, our nation was founded on money and violence (see slavery, native genocide). But remember also the Civil War, women's suffrage, civil rights and gay rights, and remember America's extraordinary labor-saving and

Justice for Otto Warmbier

I can only hope that retribution for the egregious death of Otto Warmbier is swift and sure. This horrible tragedy resulted from no more than a college prank, leading to the death of a vibrant, loving and intelligent young man. I can only imagine the suffering endured by his family, and was brought to tears by their description of the peace that had come over his face, even when he was in a coma, as he realized that at last he was home.

Life of the complex celebrity crime maven

The notion of Americans reinventing themselves has become such a well-worn trope -- even among cliches -- that one is hesitant to use it. I can never forget that self-appointed cultural arbiter, the late Susan Sontag, using it over and over again to explain what her novel chronicling the California life of Polish actress Helena Modjeska "In America" was about.

FILE - In this June 13, 2013 file photo, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trumps closest allies are attacking the integrity of those involved in the widening probe of Russian interference in the U.S. election, accusing special counsel Mueller of driving a biased investigation. And Trump himself took aim at the senior Justice Department official responsible for appointing Mueller, accusing him on Twitter of leading a Witch Hunt.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

No stacking the deck

Robert Mueller III has always got high marks for probity, integrity and honesty, but as a Washington lawyer of considerable talent he should know that sometimes it's the perception that counts most. Mr. Mueller is asking a skeptical capital to take too much on faith.

FILE - In this June 13, 2017 file photo, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. speaks at Republican National Committee Headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Liberal groups resistant to Republican policies say they have no plans to change their tactics or approach after a gunman apparently driven by his hatred of President Donald Trump opened fire at a GOP baseball practice, grievously injuring a top Republican congressman and several others. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Sitting ducks in Congress

Sitting members of Congress should not be sitting ducks. Last week's shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and several Republican staff members at a baseball field in suburban Washington revealed them to be exactly that. They can thank the District of Columbia's excessive and spiteful firearms restrictions. Laws hindering their ability to carry a concealed weapon should be relaxed to enable members of Congress and other law-abiding Washingtonians to protect themselves.

In this image from Senate Television video, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses as he speaks Wednesday, June 14, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington, about the shooting at the Republican congressional baseball practice. In remarks made on June 22, Mr. Sanders told an audience that the U.S. is headed in an authoritarian direction under President Trump. (Senate Television via AP) **FILE**

Bern victims pile up in Democratic Party

- The Washington Times

If the anti-Trump fever the media keeps telling us all about cannot break through in Georgia's 6th District, then it truly is nothing but a phantom that exists nowhere but in the minds of media elites hysterically trying to will President Trump out of existence.

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