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Fund service-year programs

America today faces a staggering reality: 5.5 million young adults are currently neither in school nor working. This is a gross underutilization of a vast pool of untapped talent and energy, resources that could be used to build communities across the nation and abroad. Service-year programs such as AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps and YouthBuild provide opportunities for Americans to gain workforce skills and provide creative solutions to address many issues that face communities today. As racial, economic, religious and political division is on the rise, this is not a time to cut funding to programs that help to build and strengthen communities. Instead it is time to support those initiatives so that all participants benefit.

Save Venezuela

The international community must save the Venezuelan people from corrupt Nicolas Maduro's communist dictatorship. The free world and President Trump must help through sanctions and diplomacy to prevent total economic disaster and the massacre of Venezuelans by Cuban military and Venezuelan security forces.

First lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump arrive to greet French President Emmanuel Macron at the U.S. Embassy, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Brussels. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How to strangle a government

The Trump administration is coming together slowly, with many important positions still without bodies after almost six months gone by since the inauguration, and the pace is not likely to quicken soon. The Democrats have no interest in helping, since the bureaucracy is mostly staffed with Democrats. Without strong Republican leadership in place at the top the mice can play and wreak partisan mischief.

A Christian high school in Maryland is defending its decision to ban pregnant 18-year-old Maddi Runkles from her graduation ceremony next month, claiming she behaved immorally. (FOX5)

Give Maddi Runkles her due

This is the season of pride, hope and ambition. Thousands of young men and women will walk across a stage in stadiums, arenas and auditoriums to get a coveted reward for 12 years of pain, strain and hard work. The graduates, with their parents and teachers, can rightly take a bow for genuine accomplishment.

Republican candidate for Montana's only U.S. House seat, Greg Gianforte, sits in a vehicle near a Discovery Drive building Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in Bozeman, Mont. A reporter said Gianforte "body-slammed" him Wednesday, the day before the special election. (Freddy Monares/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP)

Greg Gianforte's teachable moment: Don't body-slam reporters

- The Washington Times

Greg Gianforte, Montana's Republican hopeful for the congressional seat vacated by Ryan Zinke -- who's now President Donald Trump's secretary of Interior -- had a little bit of an altercation with one of the reporters who questioned him at his campaign headquarters in Bozeman. And given the special election is Thursday, one might say the unpleasantries came at a quite inopportune time. Moreover, altercation is probably an understatement.

Journalist Bob Woodward sits at the head table during the White House Correspondents' Dinner in Washington, Saturday, April 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) ** FILE **

Bob Woodward's right -- the media is 'smug'

- The Washington Times

Bob Woodward, one of the legendary Washington Post journalists who broke Watergate said reporters ought to tread carefully, or face the risk of tripping over their own smug attitudes. That's a pretty apt summary of the nastiness and snark that passes as Investigative Reporting, and Hard Journalism these days.

Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway listens as Budget Director Mick Mulvaney speak to the media about President Donald Trump's proposed fiscal 2018 federal budget in the Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

AP fires freelancer for anti-Trump post

- The Washington Times

The Associated Press, in a near-unprecedented move for a mainstream news outlet, fired a freelance journalist it employed after it was discovered she posted anti-Donald Trump remarks on her Facebook page in 2016 -- and then sneaked into a closed Republican event and reported negatively on Kellyanne Conway.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security's Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

Illustration on domestic political threats to the Trump presidency by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Is President Trump in trouble?

The bad news for President Trump keeps coming his way, notwithstanding a generally bravura performance on the foreign stage this past week in Riyadh, Jerusalem and Vatican City. Yet while he is overseas, his colleagues here in the United States have been advising him to hire criminal defense counsel, and he has apparently begun that process. Can the president be charged with obstructing justice when he asks that federal investigations of his friends be shut down?

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