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Illustration on the risk of EMP attacks on the nation's power grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the electric grid has been compromised


Illustration on the success of Trumponomics in red states by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Where Trumponomics is working


Modest Growth Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax cut reality




Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique








Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

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Conservatism betrayed

"How the Right Lost Its Mind" is an important work. Any serious-minded citizen, no matter of what political persuasion, will benefit from reading it and carefully contemplating the powerful message of its thoughtful, solidly conservative author.

Member of the San Francisco 49ers kneel during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

SNYDER: Maybe the country needs a football timeout

Roger Goodell and NFL team owners don't want to hear this, but perhaps the nation would benefit from taking a little football break. The reason doesn't matter, even if it's as irrational as opposition to protests during the national anthem.

Accompanied by Puerto Rican Gov. Ricardo Rossello and first lady Beatriz Rossello, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence greets soldiers at the Muniz National Guard Air Base, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017.  The trip comes days after U.S President Donald Trump visited Puerto Rico and praised relief efforts without mentioning the criticism that the federal response has drawn. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

Mike Pence, mocked for principles the left just can't fathom

- The Washington Times

Mike Pence, post-Colts-49ers walkout, has been mocked mercilessly by a vicious left as little more than a media hog and public relations stuntman for daring to leave the game in protest of players' national anthem kneeling. The left, the suspicious, mega-partisan, ever-political left, just can't believe that someone would actually stand on principle.

In this July 25, 2012, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown waits for the start of a news conference to announce plans to build a giant twin tunnel system to move water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to farmland and cities, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

California crazy: Calling a 'he-she' a 'he' can now get you jailed

- The Washington Times

It's madness in California, as Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, of course, just signed into law a bill that creates special rights for LGBT senior-age adults in long-term nursing care that requires them to be referred to by their gender pronouns of choice. Those who don't? It's off to jail they go. Free speech, anyone?

Vice President Mike Pence takes a photo with a fan before an NFL football game between the Indianapolis Colts and the San Francisco 49ers, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

NFL players union still doesn't get it

- The Washington Times

Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence walked out of the Colts-49ers football game after players fell to their knees in protest of the national anthem. Shortly after, the NFL Players Association released a statement of support for the kneelers. Make that: The tone-deaf NFL Players Association released a statement.

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper watches his two-run homer in the eighth inning in Game 2 of baseball's National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs, at Nationals Park, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

LOVERRO: Nationals make case for old-school baseball

But if you listened closely enough, you heard cheers for the Nationals Saturday from those around the country in the baseball industry who make their living in hotel rooms at Super 8s and Rodeway Inns, in places like Bozeman, Montana, and Clayton, Alabama.

Illustration on sixties precursors to current violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old divisions, renewed violence

Virginia Tech, Newtown, San Bernardino, Orlando, Las Vegas ... a roll call of carnage so familiar that we can almost repeat it in our sleep. We read the number of dead and wounded. But these are really tragedies beyond reckoning, as the tears of loved ones wash upon the shores of illimitable grief.

Kennedy's Unopened Door Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ken Burns, JFK and the unopened door

As a Vietnam veteran, I was reluctant to push the Ken Burns Vietnam documentary film button. Would it be little more than painful propaganda? This apprehension was only half right. It's not propaganda. Every American should see it.

Interfering with Foreign Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Foreign policy and opportunistic lawsuits

Navigating the shoals of foreign policy is hard at the best times, especially in the Middle East. It becomes impossible if the courts grab hold of the steering wheel. Yet that is the prospect in a case shortly being considered by the Supreme Court.

Aaron Scott, left, prays during a service conducted by Rev. Sarah Monroe, right, at Chaplains on the Harbor church in Westport, Wash., Thursday, June 15, 2017. "I don't think our politicians know how high the stakes are here, and after so many years have gone by with our situation still as devastated as it is, I don't know if they care," Monroe says. "I'm not sure how much worse it can get, and at the same time I'm afraid to see how much worse it can get." (AP Photo/David Goldman)

At last, a president who protects our fundamental religious freedoms

The men who gathered to create our country and the Constitution were a varied group. Many of them were Christians, but some did not believe in the God of the Old and New Testaments. Yet, they proposed to establish a sovereign nation where people of all faiths and no faith would be welcome; where the freedom of conscience and religion would not be violated by the government. In a miracle of the ages, they succeeded in creating the first nation where both those who believe in God and those who don't are safe from government coercion.

Richard Cohen of the Southern Poverty Law Center. **FILE**

Making money on hate

These are not happy times for the Southern Poverty Law Center, which doesn't have a lot to do with the South, poverty or the law, and it thrives far from the center of the political spectrum. The center is mostly a cash machine, and it has raised hundreds of millions of dollars, mostly from well-meaning but gullible liberals — "progressives" in the current argot — in the name of fighting injustice and hate. Lately it has been called out as a hate group itself.

Left's gun-law hypocrisy

As expected from the radical left, in the face of the tragic mass killings in Las Vegas the words of comfort to the grieving are rushed through to get to the usual political message about guns and the gun lobby. Forgive me, but I would like to offer another view on the subject of taking away our gun rights in order to stop senseless killing.

From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen, sing together during a National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral, in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A mandate for religious freedom

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

Donald Trump's new guidelines for protecting religious faith restore justice

The Washington Times

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

EMP-burst danger not news

In "Congress seeks IG probe of radio" (Web, Oct. 4) Bill Gertz highlights aspects of a report produced by the Energy Department and the Electric Power Research Institute. The report concludes that more needs to be done to understand and respond to the electronic magnetic pulse (EMP) threat.

How Reagan was heir to the New Deal

It's true that Ronald Reagan began his political career in Hollywood as a Democrat, albeit a Democrat who fought the pervasive Communist influence in the screen unions of the day. And he would also campaign enthusiastically for Harry Truman, who was opposed by Henry Wallace, FDR's former vice president, and his Communist-tainted Progressive Party.

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