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Illustration on Obama's undermining Arctic oil exploration and production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tapping into energy obstructionism

U.S.-Iran Policy Paradox Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Mideast paradox

Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Related Articles

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2015, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. Even as Obama tries to make a hard case for sentencing reform, prisoner rehabilitation and confronting racial bias in policing, he has been less clear about the death penalty. Obama has hinted that his support for capital punishment is eroding, but he has refused to discuss what he might call for. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

When danger is deliberate

Barack Obama is blowing past all signs of caution on the left lanes of the road of American politics. That's a dog-bites-man headline that by now is common knowledge. He no longer cares what Americans think of his leadership. His "my way or the highway" handling of the Syrian refugee crisis, which could endanger the homeland, seals it.

Real enemy is in White House

Having had President Obama in office for almost seven years, the American public should no longer be confused about who the real enemy is. During his reign in office — yes, reign is the correct description of his time in the White House — Mr. Obama has abandoned all the principles that have made this a great nation. Denigrating our democratic friends internationally while coddling the perpetrators of terror, he has destroyed the credibility of our nation and our stated mission.

'Political correctness' a misnomer

The concept of 'political correctness' is not legitimate. Somehow the term has stuck, as evidenced by its usage in Gerald Walpin's excellent piece ("The demise of academic freedom," Web, Nov. 19). Unfortunately, it's probably here to stay, though, because of common usage.

Call terrorism what it is -- and fight it

Shakespeare wrote "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." We have all seen for decades the murder, rape, mutilation and torture perpetrated by barbaric terrorists around the world. They call themselves Hamas, Hezbollah, Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, Al Jihad, al-Qaeda and now the Islamic State. All of these are but the poisonous bouquet spawned by what many call a "religion of peace."

FILE - in this Nov. 13, 2012 photo a worker pulls a line of shopping carts toward a Wal-Mart store in North Kingstown, R.I.  Wal-Mart reported improved customer traffic and an uptick in a key sales figure as it topped earnings expectations in the third quarter, even as a stronger dollar pressured its performance overseas. Its shares edged up more than 2 percent in premarket trading Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015 after it detailed results from the quarter that ended Oct. 31. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Jeers for the greedy on Thanksgiving Day

Black Friday is traditionally the first taste of holiday cheer. Thanksgiving is unique in that it has never been commercialized like Christmas, although they're working on it. One national advertiser thinks it should be renamed "Thanksgetting." For union organizers, it means an opportunity to protest for higher wages. If the crowds flocking to the nation's malls are anything like recent years, it means consumers aren't buying the politics of envy.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Dark Corners'

Psychological mysteries are a Ruth Rendell specialty, and her final book is no exception. It is an exploration of an ostensibly average group of people and how they become involved in a murder over failure to pay rent. The decline and fall of Carl Martin might be considered a warning about what a really nasty tenant can do to a landlord.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Main That Got Away: The Life and Songs of Harold Arlen'

Perhaps it is because songs are called by the name their lyricist has given them that their composers sometimes seem to be less-known than the wordsmiths. Unless, of course, when they have been part of an indelible duo that has somehow entered the lexicon of musicals, like Rodgers and Hart, or Kern and Hammerstein, or after Kern and Hart dropped off, that rare successful remarriage Rodgers and Hammerstein.

"Freedom From Want" by Norman Rockwell          Associated Press photo

Finding more than faults on the all-American holiday

Has anybody seen Norman Rockwell? We gather together for the Thanksgiving holiday and a few days of family togetherness. The tables are groaning under time-honored dishes of our Pilgrim forefathers, or so we like to think. We tell innocent stories about them and their Native American guests (or "Indians," as the first settlers called them.)

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