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Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty



Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense




Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?




North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China


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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

If Trump flips Pennsylvania, all bets are off

- The Washington Times

No state is more important to Donald Trump's chances of winning the White House than Pennsylvania, and -- unlike any Republican presidential in the past 20 years -- he actually has a chance to win it.

President Barack Obama speaks during the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia , Wednesday, July 27, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The biggest ego in town

President Obama is not the incarnation of Demosthenes, or even William Jennings Bryan, as he seems to think, but he's not bad on a good day with the right subject matter. His favorite subject matter, which is not necessarily the people's choice, is about him.

Clinton, Trump equally bad for U.S.

During this election cycle, Donald Trump made an issue of Sen. Ted Cruz's "natural-born" status, but few even considered the reason our Founders put those words into the Constitution. Our Founding Fathers feared that an agent of a foreign government could be elected president and not have the interests of the United States as their first and only priority.

Vote Libertarian in 2016

In the last two weeks of July, non-stop cable TV gave us insight into the presidential nominees selected by the Republican and Democratic parties. Afterward we wondered, "Is this the best they have to offer?" Both parties presented candidates who are demonstratively dishonest and temperamentally unfit for the office of president.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Noise of Time'

In his remarkable new novel, Julian Barnes tells the story of the Russian composer, Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich, and how the "noise of time" surrounding his life, be it the adulation, humiliation, prestige and dishonor heaped upon him, or the pressure of "Power" to write music "for the people," affected him.

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby said she has no regrets in bringing charges against the six officers. (Associated Press)

Justice in Baltimore

Marilyn Mosby, no Blackstone she, has made such a mess in Baltimore that the city won't live it down for decades. The Baltimore state's attorney announced this week that she was dropping all charges against the remaining Baltimore police officers she charged with murder in the 2005 death of Freddie Gray.

Delegates cheer during the third day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

An unconventional abridgment of free speech

This summer, we have all witnessed the heavy hand of government intervening in the freedom of speech, as the behavior of the Secret Service at both the Republican convention in Cleveland and the Democratic convention in Philadelphia has been troubling and unconstitutional.

Illustration on the changing weapons used in the war between the sexes by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Changing at the speed of light

Sexual politics continues to change at the speed of light. Some men get it, others don't. Among those who don't is Roger Ailes, who thought he could continue to star in an episode of "Mad Men" long after the sitcom and the era it represented passed its sell-by date.

A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary inside a voting booth on Feb. 9 in Manchester, N.H. (Associated Press)

The other battle at the ballot box

Party conventions, first of the Republicans in Cleveland and this week of the Democrats in Philadelphia, first and foremost are about whose name goes on the top of the ballot. Before any votes are cast on Nov. 8, though, questions must be settled about identification rules determining who gets to cast a ballot. Voter identification laws, popularly called ID laws, have proliferated.

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