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Illustration on merging health insurance providers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Proving their medicine is a good as their perks

Illustration on National Manufacturing Day by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Celebrating manufacturing

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks as he heads a meeting of the Presidential Council for Civil Society and Human Rights at the Alexadrovsky Hall in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Now Russia turns to Syria

Illustration on China's coverup of it's abuses in Tibet by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgotten Tibet

Related Articles

Looking for a speaker

Given the challenges that come with the job, John Boehner has done some things well as the speaker of the House and the leader of the Republican majority. But what he doesn't do well is communicate with the world beyond the Beltway. Washington often forgets that "beyond the Beltway" is where everybody lives.

Conservatives sick of wheeler dealers

If we had a Senate majority leader who provided real leadership, the Republicans could have used reconciliation in the Senate to defund President Obama's amnesty, health-care and Planned Parenthood endeavors, giving the Democrats a dose of their own bad medicine that has harmed the lives and health of many Americans.

Politics pushed USPS into red

In a commentary piece on the U.S. Postal Service's plans to upgrade its vehicle fleet, Ken Blackwell called the Postal Service "the poster child for government waste" ("How the Postal Service continues to burn money," Web, Aug. 27). He's wrong on the merits and the facts.

The coming coding conundrum

"Gray's Anatomy" illustrated the entire human body with 1,247 engravings when it was published in 1918, but starting today doctors must employ nearly 70,000 codes to document their efforts to heal it.

Russian President President Vladimir Putin listens to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon after the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, New York, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (Mikhail Klimentyev, RIA-Novosti, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

When big talk meets action

President Obama was full of talk this week, declaring that as the world's greatest military power the United States will defeat the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. No argument here. The United States can defeat any enemy it seriously sets out to defeat.

Martland's treatment unsurprising

The U.S. Army discharges decorated and brave Sgt. First Class Charles Martland for having the temerity to stand up for young children in Afghanistan who are regularly raped and sexually abused by perverted old scumbags on an American military base.

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