U.S.-Russia Crosstalk - Washington Times

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FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, file photo, the American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. stocks slipped early Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, as investors continued to sell phone company and utility stocks. Materials companies are the exception, as theyre trading higher as the dollar weakens. Investors are also sifting through reports that showed inflation remained weak in July, but home building and factory production improved. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Worries over American ascendancy


Russia's Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, welcomes his New Zealand's counterpart Murray McCully during their meeting in Moscow, Russia, on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Hierarchy of threats to Russia


In this Nov. 4, 2015 photo, Iranian demonstrators chant slogans during an annual rally in front of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran. The annual state-organized rally drew greater attention, as Iranian hardliners are intensifying a campaign to undermine President Hassan Rouhani's outreach to the West following a landmark nuclear deal reached with world powers in July. The Iran nuclear accord is fragile at its one-year anniversary. Upcoming elections in the U.S. and Iran could yield new leaders determined to derail the deal. The Mideast wars pit U.S. and Iranian proxies in conflict, with risks of escalation. Iran's ballistic missiles are threatening American allies in the Arab world and Israel, raising pressure on the United States to respond with force. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)

US RUSSIA CROSSTALK: Middle East stability talks

- The Washington Times

In this Sept. 27, 2012 photo, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shows an illustration as he describes his concerns over Iran's nuclear ambitions during his address to the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. The Iran nuclear accord is fragile at its one-year anniversary. Upcoming elections in the U.S. and Iran could yield new leaders determined to derail the deal. The Mideast wars pit U.S. and Iranian proxies in conflict, with risks of escalation. Iran's ballistic missiles are threatening American allies in the Arab world and Israel, raising pressure on the United States to respond with force.  (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Iran nuclear deal: One year later



Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses a rally marking the 563rd anniversary of the Ottoman conquest of Istanbul -  formerly Constantinople - in Istanbul, Turkey, Sunday, May 29, 2016. Erdogan has criticized the United States, Russia and Iran for their presence in Syria and said their unwillingness to depose Syrian President Bashar Assad was contributing to Syrian peoples' massacre and pain.(AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

Mideast still needs Turkey


Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Chinese President Xi Jinping exchange documents at the signing ceremony in the Kremlin in Moscow, Friday, May 8, 2015. Russian and Chinese leaders have signed a plethora of deals in Moscow, giving Russia billions in infrastructure loans. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Eurasian unity vs. zero sum











Pope Francis is greeted by the faithful during his visit to the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, Sunday, July 12, 2015. Pope Francis began the last day of a weeklong South American tour with a stop to the Asuncion slum that borders the Paraguay river that frequently floods it and makes its dirt roads impassable pools of mud. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia, Pool)

Pope Francis burnishes credentials on South America tour

- Associated Press

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