- The Washington Times
Friday, September 8, 2017

Researchers at the University of Washington received a $138,000 grant from the federal government to study the ‘internal gender identity’ of children between the ages of four and six.

The National Science Foundation recently awarded funding for a two-year study on the ability of prominent theories of gender development to account for a “wider range of human gender experiences.” The study began July 1 and runs through June 30, 2019.


“The project will involve asking 250, 4- to 6-year olds and their parents to complete a battery of measures assessing early and current gender socialization, children’s internal sense of gender identity, children’s gendered behavior (e.g., preferences for gender-typed toys) and measures of related gender cognition (e.g., memory for gender-consistent vs. inconsistent behaviors),” NSF’s award abstract, first reported by The Washington Free Beacon on Friday, says.

“These measures will allow the researchers to examine the relative contributions of internal gender identity and socialization and ultimately provide a more comprehensive theory accounting for early gender development.”

Two of the researchers spearheading the project include Kristina Olson and Selin Gülgöz. The Free Beacon noted that both women work on the school’s “TransYouth Project,” a longitudinal study of gender development and mental health of transgender children.

“In addition to our primary goal of supporting the first major study of transgender children in the U.S., we are also conducting research about the origins of anti-transgender bias, and have plans for outreach projects in collaboration with some of our partner organizations,” Ms. Gülgöz says on her ResearchGate.net profile page.


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