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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

By now you’ve seen the tasteless, shocking, gruesome and disgraceful image of third-rate comedienne Kathy Griffin holding a prop meant to be the bloody, severed head of President Trump.

Apparently, impeachment is insufficient for some Trump haters; beheading is the only fair punishment.


Soon after this image made its way around the world on social media, news broke that the Secret Service wanted to talk to Ms. Griffin, causing her to hurriedly publish an apology video.


AUDIO: Matt Mackowiak with Karin Elliott House


After nearly 24 hours of public outcry, CNN finally cut ties with Ms. Griffin, who co-hosts their painfully awkward annual New Year’s Eve telecast.

Outrageous language has been escalating for weeks. What began with a sexually explicit and vulgar on-air “joke” by CBS late night host Stephen Colbert led to Ms. Griffin’s provocative outburst. Each unbelievable lashing out aims to outdo its predecessor.

I would hope all sane Americans can agree that Kathy Griffin’s despicable act was indefensible.

Mr. Trump revealed on social media that the image upset his young son Barron, as it must have also bothered the young children of the president’s older children. Ms. Griffin thought she was being funny, which her career has shown is never the case. But more than that, she intended to galvanize the angry Left, which has consistently targeted, delegitimized and attacked this president in ways this country has never seen.

Conservatives were deeply troubled by President Obama’s march toward European-style socialism, with big-government policies, unconstitutional actions and stifling regulations. But I don’t recall images of his severed head being shared by celebrities.

Most Republicans have publicly admired Barack Obama the man, the husband, and the father. I know I certainly have. Policy disagreements need not limit personal admiration.

But in the first 4 1/2 months, liberals and Democrats have become unhinged in their relentless attacks on Mr. Trump. Rarely do those attacks mention policy, resorting instead to personal invective and ad hominem attacks.

I recognize that Mr. Trump’s agenda has strong support among his base and faces strong opposition from Democrats. It was a close election, and voters clearly have strong opinions about this president.

But so far Democrats only have been willing to oppose Mr. Trump, at times with vicious language, rather than propose their own agenda. That approach has its limitations. What do Democrats stand for? How would they grow the economy? How would they “fix” Obamacare?

Special elections in Kansas and Montana resulted in Democratic losses, and the first round in Georgia saw the Democratic candidate fall short of the 50 percent threshold needed to claim the seat outright.

Mr. Trump told us we would get tired of winning. When will Democrats get tired of losing?

The rabid left wing base demands 24/7 opposition to Mr. Trump, with zero tolerance for dissenters.

Trump Derangement Syndrome has infested Democrats like Rep. Maxine Waters, the California Democrat who has called for impeachment but cannot explain what statutes would apply.

Trump Derangement Syndrome infected those New York students who refused to listen to Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and around 100 students at Notre Dame University who walked out of the commencement address given by Vice President Mike Pence.

Trump Derangement Syndrome has struck Rep. Joaquin Castro, Texas Democrat, who several weeks ago said he wouldn’t be surprised if Mr. Trump and his associates “ended up in jail,” even though he is supposedly participating in an “impartial” investigation as a member of the House Intelligence Committee.

Trump Derangement Syndrome has contaminated MSNBC host Joe Scarborough, who on Tuesday claimed that Mr. Trump’s first foreign trip was the worst by a U.S. president since 1961.

Where does it end? When will the Left police its own? When will the Democrats start to put country before party?

When, in short, is enough going to be enough?

Matt Mackowiak is the president of Austin-based Potomac Strategy Group, a Republican consultant, a Bush administration and Bush-Cheney re-election campaign veteran, and former press secretary to two U.S. senators. He is the host of a new national politics podcast, “Mack on Politics,” produced in partnership with The Washington Times. His podcast may be found at washingtontimes.com/mackonpolitics.


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